Chicago

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1994 (The 1995 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? Yes  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 2006 (ranked #191) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Chicago Transit Authority (1969)
Chicago (II) (1970)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? (1969)
25 Or 6 To 4 (1970)
Saturday In The Park (1972)
If You Leave Me Now (1976)

Chicago @ Wikipedia

Chicago Videos

Will Chicago be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

959 comments so far (post your own)

Is there anyone who deserves it more than these guys? Come on... they're not even on the future possible list for any year.

Posted by Will on Wednesday, 11.1.06 @ 04:52am


Chicago is #1 on my poll at:
http://www.rateitall.com/t-2529-deserving-of-the-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame.aspx
It seems to me they should have a higher Induction Chance % here.

Posted by Garrett on Wednesday, 11.1.06 @ 15:09pm


Chicago should already be inducted. This just goes to show the extreme bias, as well a a lack of knowledge of one of the best groups to ever be formed. Terry Kath, Peter Cetera, Robert Lamm and the rest of the group deserve this honor more than most. Pity.

Posted by Guitar Man on Sunday, 11.5.06 @ 17:27pm


Come on! Grandmaster Flash better than Chicago??? Pull your head out! Put Chicago in the Hall!

Posted by Jeff on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 05:42am


Chicago will never be inducted because of Jann Wenner, and his personal vendeta from years ago. This is just one reason of many, why the Hall is such a joke

Posted by Mark on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 06:05am


Jann Wenner will never allow them in. His school yard grudge from years ago will prevent them from getting in.

Even if they are ever nominated, 5 bucks says they decline.

Posted by Kathryn on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 06:08am


2 words will keep Chicago out of The Hall of Shame. Jann Wenner. Jann and his temper tantrum over an interview, will keep one of the most deserving bands of all time out.

Hey Jann, get over it!

Posted by Susan on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 06:10am


The unfathomable exclusion of Chicago from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a damning blight upon the entire system. There is no intelligent reason to not induct them. The HOF is a sham without them.

Posted by Mark L Bakke on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 13:41pm


The HoF is a sham regardless of what it does or does not have.

Posted by William on Tuesday, 01.9.07 @ 13:53pm


Chicago not being in the R&R Hall is a crying shame, there is NO way they will attend any ceremony if they ever due get inducted. They were eligible first back in 1994, to not have them in is RIDICULOUS. In my opinion they are the worst snub for a group, as far as solo artists go you tell me how Neil Diamond isn't in the Hall. If I was running the show at the Hall I would immediately induct those two artists along with Kiss, Alice Cooper, Rush, Def Leppard, Yes and Mellencamp everyone else has no HUGE beef. Those artists DO!

Posted by Pete on Friday, 01.12.07 @ 11:04am


Chicago should be in the Rock and Roll Hall of fame. One of the first bands to use horns extensively, has had a top forty album in at least 5 different decades, ranked #2 behind the beach boys as the top american band of all time.

But Chicago will not get in as long as Jann Wenner is there with the Rock and Roll committee

Posted by Mary on Tuesday, 01.30.07 @ 20:46pm


I agree with you guys that Chicago should be in the Hall. But Flash and the Five finally got their due as pioneers of Rap/Hip-Hop music. I mean come on!!!! They had to put some Rap/Hip-Hop musicians in the Rock Hall sooner or later!!! Don't you guys think so ??? Personally I think the only other Rap group that should go in the Hall is Run-DMC.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 01.31.07 @ 17:39pm


The body of work Chicago did for rock n roll is tremedous, and they damn straight deserve to be in the rock n roll "hall". Deep Purple and The Moody Blues also deserve to be there. What's up with the voting process, who are these people?

Posted by moomootay on Saturday, 02.10.07 @ 05:03am


The "HOF" is a joke. Just look at "most" of people already in it. Why don't you put the Backstreet Boys and N'Sync in. After all, you already have no credibility.

Posted by Thomas on Tuesday, 03.13.07 @ 10:16am


No Moody Blues, no Yes, no Chicago, no ELP, no Rush, no Tull, no Purple, no Alice, no Hall and Oates, no ELO, no Cars, no Feat....

There can be no true Rock and Roll Hall of Fame without these folks.......

Posted by Mac on Tuesday, 03.13.07 @ 17:46pm


Chicago should have been in years ago, on the strength of their catalog from 1967-1982. Reinventing themselves gave them additional hits from the period 1982-1991. Five different lead singers over the years, all with hits. The songs with multi-vocals. The horns, the list goes on. Few horn bands have followed because a seven or eight member band costs a lot of money. This is a personal vendetta to keep them out, when all the B listers are getting in now.

Posted by Mark on Sunday, 03.18.07 @ 17:31pm


When Chicago created their pop-rock style in the early 80's, they found a perfect formual and stuck with it for the rest of the decade. The only knock on them is that their 80's tunes kinda all sound the same. Let them in.

Posted by Creepozoid on Tuesday, 04.10.07 @ 03:07am


Chicago not in the Hall is a joke, plain and simple. Their exclusion devalues the entire HOF experience.

Posted by Dave on Tuesday, 04.10.07 @ 18:32pm


Perhaps the most embarassing thing to the Hall I can think of is that this band is not in the Hall of fame. And it is compounded yearly with the grandmaster flash's- and bogus inductees that follow.
You can erect a building gather a group of writers with media pull and make all the presentations you want but the people cannot be fooled. We know who the forgotten greats are.
The real damage is the youth that may not know.
Go to the Hall look over the list of inductees and never see the name CHICAGO sitting there.

Posted by anthony on Saturday, 04.28.07 @ 16:43pm


how can Chicago NOT go in??? they HAVE to be in the Rock and Roll hall of fame! original, talented. come on!! 30 LP's and counting!

Posted by Steve on Friday, 06.1.07 @ 15:58pm


Each year the list of inductees makes me wonder is this really a HOF. Chicago should have been inducted when they became eligible in '94. Since their first two albums with tracks like "25 or 6 ro 4?" where Terry Kath's guitar work defined him as one of the best around, their cover of "I'm a Man" with the lead vocals being handled by numerous band members, "Dialogue (Part I & II) asking questions which are still relevant today, to "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World" which showcased Terry Kath's richly captivating baritone voice. To Jann Wenner all I have to say as far as advice is that you should take the advice from the title of an Eagles song and just get over it!!

Posted by richard on Tuesday, 06.5.07 @ 02:12am


I'm not a big Chicago fan but I have to say that they are one of the more puzzling exclusions. They have extraordinary longevity, a distinctive sound (in other words, they're not derivative), tons of commerical success, and some critical success in their early years. Seems like an airtight resume to me. Traffic belongs, but not Chicago? Really?

Posted by A-Killa on Tuesday, 06.5.07 @ 15:33pm


Really.

Posted by Dezmond on Wednesday, 06.6.07 @ 08:12am


No love for the 1994 generation:
Chicago
-Stooges
-Alice Cooper
-King Crimson
-Grand Funk railroad
-Yes
-Warren Zevon
-Johnny Winter
-Joe Cocker
All these people could have their place in the hall and all emerged in 1969

Posted by roméo on Wednesday, 06.6.07 @ 09:56am


I FIND IT REPULSIVE AND RIDICULOUS THAT CHICAGO IS NOT IN. THEY HAVE TOURED FOR 40 YEARS AND ARE THE MOST SUCCESSFUL BAND OF ALL TIME. THEIR BODY OF WORK SURPASSES EVERYONE AND ANYONE ELSE IN THE HALL OF FAME.

ON ANOTHER NOTE: WHAT ABOUT THE ROLLING STONES AND THE DO0BIE BROTHERS?

WHO IS IN CHARGE OF THIS CIRCUS?

MJB...SEATTLE

Posted by MJB on Saturday, 06.23.07 @ 14:46pm


MJB

1) Are Chicago REALLY the most successful band of all time?

2) Does touring for forty years automatically warrant induction?

3) The Rolling Stones are already in the Hall Of Fame. First ballot. Who woulda thunk it?

Posted by Casper on Saturday, 06.23.07 @ 21:52pm


hall of fame - too cool for chicago ?? - they should be in

Posted by ms on Wednesday, 08.1.07 @ 06:53am


Perhaps the most embarassing thing to the Hall I can think of is that this band is not in the Hall of fame. And it is compounded yearly with the grandmaster flash's- and bogus inductees that follow.
You can erect a building gather a group of writers with media pull and make all the presentations you want but the people cannot be fooled. We know who the forgotten greats are.
The real damage is the youth that may not know.
Go to the Hall look over the list of inductees and never see the name CHICAGO sitting there.

Posted by anthony on Sunday, 08.12.07 @ 21:03pm


I think the youth would be damaged if they had to hear Chicago songs.

And what is with the anti-Grandmaster Flash bias? Seems to be coming from forty year old whities in the suburbs, I presume.

Posted by Casper on Monday, 08.13.07 @ 12:10pm


they should be in - no question - i wonder why they do not have atleast more consideration.

Posted by MIKE on Monday, 08.13.07 @ 13:43pm


Artists like Chicago are hurt with this particular nominating committee because they consider anybody after 1970 who was more popular on AM radio than FM radio to be uncool. They want an edgier feel (or heroin use as in the case with James Taylor types) otherwise no go. This is what I believe hurts others to varying degrees like Neil Diamond , Linda Ronstadt, John Denver, Three Dog Night, The Carpenters, The Doobie Brothers, Hall & Oates......

Posted by SG on Tuesday, 08.14.07 @ 01:21am


I also wanna say that I agree with Casper that the youth of today would be damaged if they had to hear Chicago songs. This is because the youth of today aren't able to process what's known as M-E-L-O-D-Y. Most of what passes today as "music" is really just 1 note repeated in a synthesized blend of reverberated echo style vocals. Actual acoustical musical instruments are virtually unheard on commercial radio. Most public schools today don't teach much music education and the ones that do are declining in number at a fairly rapid pace. Thus if a young person was played a song like "Color My World" they would start convulsing into a state of sensory overload-not knowing how to process this information.

(I personally am not a big Chicago fan and became more bored with them as they went along though CTA is a good trip)

PS-I'm a white 40 year old guy from Philly who doesn't think Grandmaster no matter how talented is R&R either. HA!

Posted by SG on Tuesday, 08.14.07 @ 02:01am


QUOTE: Most of what passes today as "music" is really just 1 note repeated in a synthesized blend of reverberated echo style vocals.

And that puts your opinion out of the running. There's a thriving underground scene and there has been one for decades now. Those artists need to be ushered in, not what's left of the dinosaurs that sold by the bucket load. More great albums are coming out yearly in this decade than in any prior. To deny that pretty much reeks of an ignorance that considers modern music only whatever they hear when they flip the dial on the way to their neighborhood classic rock station. Whatever. Carry on wayward, son. Carry on.

Posted by Casper on Tuesday, 08.14.07 @ 19:47pm


The problem is how do you usher these underground artists into the mainstream without the fame and the $$ compromising their artistic integrity? Business is to art what Raid is to bugs.
Then you're just replacing 1 bunch of sellouts with another.

Posted by SG on Wednesday, 08.15.07 @ 00:21am


"Then you're just replacing 1 bunch of SELLOUTS with another." - SG

Ah, the cry of Sellout - the scarlet S.
The ridiculous musician's Catch-22 wherein if more than 100,00 people or so actually discover your work and decide they like your stuff enough to purchase it, you have naturally compromised your integrity, abandoned your principles and somehow betrayed a true cause.

Plenty of good art has made money for its creators. What tired bullshit.

Posted by shawn on Wednesday, 08.15.07 @ 09:01am


SG also doesn't realize that there's been plenty of indie to mainstream jumps without anything close to a sacrifice of artistic integrity....Decemberists, Replacements, Modest Mouse, etc...

Posted by Casper on Wednesday, 08.15.07 @ 12:58pm


"Plenty of good art has made money for its creators. What tired... (Profanity deleted)"

Sorry shawn old pal but I stand by what I wrote.

The musical landscape is littered with promising
carreers curtailed or gone down the abyss of $$/fame induced substance abuse/mental breakdowns (see hendrix, joplin, morrison, vicious, spence, barrett, green, erickson, gibb, a few dozen other people I don't have time to mention not just in music but in other art forms like Film -Phoenix, Monroe etc as well as thousands who didn't even make it that far)
And those that do make it find themselves slowly but surely putting out more commercial music by the year bowing to the pressure of record co. execs (see genesis, yes, heart. fleetwood mac, floyd, areosmith, etc, etc, etc, etc) funny, as I'm typing this that old glen campbell standard plays in my head..."ther'll be a load of compromisin on the road to my horizon. But I'm gonna be where the lights are shinin' on me! Like a rhinestone cowboy..."


As for you, Casper I'm not sure I understand your definition of mainstream. I must have been visiting
the concession stand while The Decemberists and The Replacements were marching in the hit parade. With Modest Mouse, "we were dead..." only hit the big time a few months ago so lets give them a liitle time to succumb to the evils of corporate culture. In 2021 when they become eligible for the Hall Of Fame and if their artistic integrity is still intact I will come back here and admit to you I was wrong.

Posted by SG on Thursday, 08.16.07 @ 02:44am


Chicago had 5 #1 albums in row (1972 - 1975)...they were THE leading singles charting group of the entire 70's(in an era of the greatest music)...they had a total of 20 top ten hits...they are the longest running & most successful US pop/rock band ever...enough said!

Imagine the MLB Hall of Fame not including The Babe?, how lame would that hall be?

Do the right thing, put Chicago in!

Posted by Al on Tuesday, 08.28.07 @ 12:14pm


Yo Casper and SG,
Can't we all get along?!?! Howz about a big Chicago-style group HUG!!! Mmmmmm, feels good, huh! Now ROCK ON!!!

Posted by Tom on Tuesday, 08.28.07 @ 12:39pm


You know, although I am an advocate for Chicago being inducted, it seemed to me that Al was grossly overstating Their chart success; until I checked the singles history myself. I was pretty amazed. Chicago did cahrt in the Hot 100 no less than 28 times.... IN THE 70's. Wow.
I have to admit, that is pretty damn impressive.

Posted by shawn on Tuesday, 08.28.07 @ 14:55pm


grand master flash ???? are you kidding - Chicago doesn t even get consideration - hall of fame is trying to be too cool . no pat benatar or Heart ???? either - i don t know ....

Posted by ms on Wednesday, 08.29.07 @ 11:48am


Well, you can't use Grandmaster Flash as a basis of comparison since that's a completely different genre. Flash was a pioneer in hip-hop and deserves to be in. It makes more sense to compare Chicago to other '70s classic rock bands that are in, such as Traffic, Skynyrd, or Bob Seger. It's unclear to me why any of those three are in and Chicago is out. I'm not even a big fan but the numbers don't lie.

Posted by A-Killa on Thursday, 08.30.07 @ 10:40am


"Do you have any actual thoughts on this issue or are you just "following" me?" -anon

The irony cloud is so thick in here I'm getting high off of the second hand smoke, dude.

Posted by shawn on Thursday, 08.30.07 @ 15:09pm


Bob Wills was a national treasure from the pre-rock era, he is in as an early influence, complaining about that is the dumbest thing I've ever seen on any website ever, and I used to post at a board about professional wrestling.

Posted by Kit on Thursday, 08.30.07 @ 15:43pm


Its obvious Chicago belongs in the Hall of Fame, I can't imagine (based on numbers alone) that anyone could/would dispute that.
What this all boils down to is prejudice on the behalf of one Jann Wenner (obviously).
That's the crime here, that if someone in a position of authority doesn't like you, or has a beef with you, then your accomplishments mean nothing.
What if he had a problem with the Beatles, could he leave them out? How about The Stones or The Who? No way, but he did seem to get away with it with Chicago.

Why?

Granted, even though they (Chicago) haven't released any worthwhile material in the last 20 years (and yes, I'm a fan), that shouldn't take away from the previous 20 years of excellent music they did make.

They are basically they're own best tribute band these days and that may have hurt their legendary status.

I just can't believe the members of the band haven't stood up for themselves and called this guy out.

Like I said, do the right thing and put them in!

And thanks Shawn, I too thought the numbers seemed a bit overblown when I started looking them up. But it's all there in black & white.
(hear that Jann?)

Posted by Al on Friday, 08.31.07 @ 11:27am


What year was it when Chicago was nominated?

This page says they were previously considered?

What year was it?

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 10.2.07 @ 16:18pm


These guys shared the spotlight with Led Zeppelin as the greatest rock bands of the 1970s. Sure, they relied heavily on ballads in the latter part of their career, but their early music was revolutionary. Although horns had always been a staple in rock, these guys found a way to integrate them into a rhythim section and vocal section. And, for the most part, they covered just about every musical genre out there. So, the reality is that they have defied categorization despite doing mainly ballads for the last 20 years. The album cuts in some cases are better than some of the hits.

These guys have been victims of changing tastes in the music industry and commercial radio, which seems lately to be only interested in the "flavor of the month" artist, and the music all sounds the same. These guys were a product of the late 60s and early 70s, when the music was far more diverse and imaginative. I blame the record companies and commercial radio for knocking out all diversity and imagination in the music these days. Chicago had to do what they did to survive.

These guys should have been in long ago.

Posted by Larry Launstein Jr. on Thursday, 10.18.07 @ 07:27am


Street Player '79 is a Disco classic.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Friday, 10.19.07 @ 10:44am


Chicago should have been in a long time ago. So, what's the beef Jann has against them?

Posted by tricia on Monday, 10.29.07 @ 08:31am


chicago not being in the rock hall of fame makes the hall look like a joke.even if you are not a fan of the the group or you have a personal vendetta they deserve their due.it looks ridiculous when the hall is inducting the dave clark five and their is no chicago[let alone neil diamond or the moody blues]what incredibly poor choices.

Posted by gdk on Friday, 12.14.07 @ 08:22am


Although, they've been relegated to the "guilty pleasures" part of my music library, I remember just how phenomenal they were at their prime years, and still enjoy their music. Listen to what is going on with the horn arrangements,listen to the incredible chops of Terry Kath on guitar, and listen to the various powerful vocalists. How can their greatness be denied? Granted,later permutations of the original band kind of turned them into a middle of the road pop act, but that hasn't stopped many others from being inducted!

Posted by Kevin on Friday, 12.14.07 @ 10:54am


Here is the truth for those of you wondering.

We the fans know that CHicago deserves this honor more than any other act out there, but as long as Jann and his comittee are in I dont think they will ever allow it. They falt out refuse to even aknowledge their existance.

So lets let Chicagos record speak for itself. After all the comittee can ignore the group but CAN NOT IGNORE the FACTS.

They are the only group to chart top 40 hits in 5 (yes count them) 5 decades.

OVER 120,000,000 albums sold

40 years and still going

Gold and Platinum albums too many to count.

Shall I go on JANN???????

MTV and Rolling Stone have control over who wins the Grammys and the American Music Awards and it is quite obvious that they now have control over the RRHOF and Jann and his comittee.

I bet you that all of the groups the comitte has liked were inducted automatically.

Jann and the comittee are BIASED and the selection process IS fixed....even though they deny it.

Let the FANS decide not some group of closed minded critics who wouldnt know good music if they heard it.

Posted by Ray on Monday, 12.17.07 @ 17:35pm


I am presently on holiday in the US and saw the farce that is the induction to the RnR HOF. I think Pattie Smith was being inducted - I've no problem with her per se but I got angry that a band like Chicago who, notwithstanding their global success were innovators,pioneers and survivors. Why are they constantly are overlooked, airbrushed out of RnR history. This is a sad situation and people like Clive Davis who was present ot see Pattie Smith inducted yet made millions of quid out of Chicago for CBS should be ashamed.

There will be no justice in this as Chicago are seen as MOR music, yet all you contributorsd know what they did to stimulate interet for thousands of people in the music world. it's just not cool to admit it.

Mark

Posted by Mark Slater on Tuesday, 01.1.08 @ 18:54pm


Chicago weren't really that innovative. Al Kooper's Blood Sweat and Tears did the whole brass section thing when Terry Kath was still polishing unloaded guns. Also, no one ever told them that the triple album isn't the default legnth, leading to their first few albums (the only ones close to being good) dragging ooooon and ooooon and oooon. Comparing them to Patti "I don't like e's" Smith is stupid because Patti Smith actually did good things for music. Chicago's Hall Case is DOA, and deriding the artists who actually deserved induction will do nothing to change that.

Posted by Kit on Tuesday, 01.1.08 @ 20:48pm


Skin Tight...your love is alright.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 09:06am


Patti Smith may have been "influential", at least that is what they say, but there is no comparison in the longevity and iconic stature of Chicago compared to the lack of a resume of P.S. I believe I once read that "Horses" was one of the most overrated albums in music history. But, hey does anybody reallly know what good music is, does anybody really care?

Posted by Truth Hurts on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 13:09pm


The arguement regarding Patti Smith and her induction and those artists who have yet to be inducted will rage on for awhile.

Patti Smith's induction has more to do with the "scene" and not so much her musical ability. She wrote words that connected with the times for many. The poet of her generation, so they say. This is the myth that surrounds her. I am of her generation and watched her perform from her early days at CBGB's. And although I am not of the opinion that she did anything "Hall of Fame" worthy, she was the critics darling and many musicians site her as a severe influence on them. And whether deservingly or not, she is in and we need to move on with the next artist/performer/musician.

As for Chicago, I give them more credit than what some wish to. Kit is correct when he mentions Al Kooper and B.S. & T. However, Chicago survived from one generation to the next where many of their peers did not. They did bring a uniqueness to the scene, and even if they weren't the first, they probably were the best at what they did. They did give us one of the best live recordings and Color My World will be a music standard long after we have all left this earth. And that has to be worth something.

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 13:59pm


"and even if they weren't the first, they probably were the best at what they did."

I agree, but this whole notion that you have to be the first is stupid. Virtually everyhting done in music was done before in some form or fashion. I mean look at Zepellin, who definitley deserve induction (it is Zep for Gods sake), but nothing they did was so unique, they were a blues rock band, all of which had been done already by the great blues musicians. In fact, from their first album, they had stolen a number of blues songs and did not even give credit.

Posted by Truth Hurts on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 14:45pm


TH - I agree with you in much of what you say. Since I have never spoken to anyone on the HoF nominating committee, what follows is only speculation on my part.

When you are first, then you are the innovator. And there can be only so many firsts. Once you get past true innovation, then the questions revolve around influence, repopularizing a genre or style, were they one of the dominant bands of their era, body of work which sometimes is attached to longevity, muscianship, commercial success, recording of songs that have or will become musical standards and a few other criteria items. Did they build another layer onto the music which influenced them?

So the question regarding Chicago may be answered in those other criteria items. If we say that BST were the innovators, then does Chicago get in based on those other items? As you stated about Zep; they were not true innovators, but they score 9's and 10's on all other criteria items.

My opinion on Chicago is yes. Not every band is going to be selected into the Hall where it is a clear cut choice. But I think Chicago is at least worthy of serious consideration.

One question does arise from this. Does Blood Sweat and Tears deserve entry into the Hall?
Thanks for bringing them up Kit.

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 15:48pm


"When you are first, then you are the innovator. And there can be only so many firsts."

Not really. No one is ever first to do something. No artist has ever REALLY innovated. The best an artist could hope for is to be able to bring their (numerous) influences together, and create something relatively new from that.

Posted by liam on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 15:55pm


Not really. No one is ever first to do something. No artist has ever REALLY innovated. The best an artist could hope for is to be able to bring their (numerous) influences together, and create something relatively new from that.

I think my point is understood in the context of what I was saying. But just to keep you quiet, I amend my statement to "Relatively New".

Liam - is it your need to disagree just for the sake of it?

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 17:36pm


The big problem that I don't think anyone mentioned (I was too lazy to look through all of the previous posts) is that if the HOF inducts Chicago, they will have to also induct Kansas, Boston, then Nazareth, America, Europe, Asia...

Where will it end?

Yes, I know that was disgusting. I still had fun writing it!

Posted by Joe on Wednesday, 01.2.08 @ 22:44pm


Why would those others have to be inducted if Chicago gets in?

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 04:06am


"Why would those others have to be inducted if Chicago gets in?" -d

C'mon Dameon --- you don't see the theme/joke Joe was constructing there?

Posted by shawn on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 08:13am


I knew there was a joke there, but I am old and my sense of humor has diminshed somewhat.

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 08:40am


"I knew there was a joke there, but I am old and my sense of humor has diminshed somewhat." -Dameon

Ha-ha. Well, it could have also had to do with it not being that good of a joke, too.

He forgot to mention:
- The Ohio Players, Alabama, World Party, L.A. Guns, Miami Sound Machine, Georgia Sattelites and Atlanta Rythm Section....... to beat a lame joke to death!

Posted by shawn on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 13:35pm


Aww man, what about...

Arctic Monkeys, British Sea Power, The Dubliners, Gary U.S. Bonds (yep, I admit to that straw-grasp), Rick SPRINGFIELD and Texas?!?!?

Posted by liam on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 15:16pm


Good ones, Liam.
They'd also have to induct:
- New York Dolls, Manhattan Transfer and Black Oak Arkansas! This is exhausting; think I'll go listen to The Traveling Wilburys now.

Posted by shawn on Thursday, 01.3.08 @ 20:17pm


He forgot to mention:
- The Ohio Players, Alabama, World Party, L.A. Guns, Miami Sound Machine, Georgia Sattelites and Atlanta Rythm Section....... to beat a lame joke to death!

They'd also have to induct:
- New York Dolls, Manhattan Transfer and Black Oak Arkansas! This is exhausting; think I'll go listen to The Traveling Wilburys now.


I actually think that when it is their time, The Miami Sound Machine may very well receive some consideration. I am not a fan, but I just got a feeling that Gloria and her husband are well liked and respected in the business.

And as for LA Guns - they may not have the chops, library or talent to be in the HoF, but they were a band that in the 80's, you could have fun with. And chicks dug them!! I know you all hate that scene with a passion, but there has to be something said for RnR chicks in tight leather mini-skirts, high heeled leather boots and spandex tops. And they looked amazing sitting on the back of my bike. (Ladies - I mean no disrespect to you with these comments) The NY scene was nothing like LA, but some good times were had at L'Amours. The Brooklyn club was better than the Queens club, but man, we had fun, no mater the club. The Scrap Bar which was right across the street from Cafe Wa in the Village was also a great place to be.


BOA did a great version of "Jim Dandy". And I think Tommy Aldridge was their drummer. He went on to play with many acts after the demise of BOA. He is considered an excellent drummer.

And I don't care what you all think, the Dolls were as important to the underground scene as anyone. So stop picking on them. Thank you very much.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 07:33am


To defend myself:

I was only naming groups that had ONLY the names of cities, states, countries, continents, etc. as their names; hence, I didn't forget the Ohio Players, LA Guns, Miami Sound Machine, etc. (I had never heard of the band Texas.)

Yes, it was a lame joke. I still had fun telling it!

Posted by Joe on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 10:44am


"(I had never heard of the band Texas.)"

They DEFINITELY exist

Posted by liam on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 11:09am


"To defend myself:
I was only naming groups that had ONLY the names of cities, states, countries, continents, etc." -Joe

That is indefensible; utterly unacceptable!

We also forgot Hanoi Rocks, Mission of Burma and perhaps even Foreigner on our little Journey in our Cars on our Highway To Hell. Maybe we should have taken the Grand Funk Railroad instead?

Posted by shawn on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 11:19am


Now I get it. I guess my parents told me the truth when they said and I quote, "if I keep listening and playing that Rock and Roll, my brain would just slowly die." Who knew!!

And just for the sake of adding my two cents in - let's not forget our newest sensation HANNAH MONTANA

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 11:31am


No more state jokes now, guys.

I'm serious >:o

Posted by liam on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 11:46am


FYI - Linkin Park is in fact a name of a town in Jersey. The spelling is a little different.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 12:06pm


Ha-ha-ha!! Hannah Montana is a great one, right there under the nose. Did not know that about Linkin (Lincoln?) Park.

John DENVER.

Posted by shawn on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 15:25pm


Correct on the spelling of Lincoln. Great little town about 25 minutes out of NYC. Some amazing spandex came out of that little sleepy town.

Posted by Dameon on Friday, 01.4.08 @ 17:20pm


Chicago & The Billboard Albums Charts (U.S.A)

The Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart

Chicago

01. 1969 - # 17 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 - # 4 Chicago II
03. 1971 - # 2 Chicago III
04. 1972 - # 3 Chicago at Carnegie Hall
05. 1972 - # 1 Chicago V
06. 1973 - # 1 Chicago VI
07. 1974 - # 1 Chicago VII
08. 1975 - # 1 Chicago VIII
09. 1975 - # 1 Chicago IX: Greatest Hits
10. 1976 - # 3 Chicago X
11. 1977 - # 6 Chicago XI
12. 1978 - # 12 Hot Streets
13. 1979 - # 21 Chicago 13
14. 1980 - # 71 Chicago XIV
15. 1981 - # 171 Greatest Hits: Volume II
16. 1982 - # 9 Chicago 16
17. 1984 - # 4 Chicago 17
18. 1987 - # 35 Chicago 18
19. 1988 - # 37 Chicago 19
20. 1989 - # 37 Greatest Hits: 1982-1989
21. 1991 - # 66 Twenty 1
22. 1995 - # 90 Night and Day
23. 1997 - # 55 The Heart of Chicago 1967-1997
24. 1998 - # 154 The Heart of Chicago II 1967-1998
25. 1998 - # 47 Chicago's First Christmas
26. 2002 - # 38 The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning
27. 2003 - # 116 Christmas: What's It Gonna Be Santa?
28. 2005 - # 57 Love Songs
29. 2006 - # 41 Chicago XXX
30. 2007 - # 100 The Best of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition

The Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart

Chicago

01. 1969 - # 17 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 - # 4 Chicago II
03. 1971 - # 2 Chicago III
04. 1972 - # 3 Chicago at Carnegie Hall
05. 1972 - # 1 Chicago V
06. 1973 - # 1 Chicago VI
07. 1974 - # 1 Chicago VII
08. 1975 - # 1 Chicago VIII
09. 1975 - # 1 Chicago IX: Greatest Hits
10. 1976 - # 3 Chicago X
11. 1977 - # 6 Chicago XI
12. 1978 - # 12 Hot Streets
13. 1979 - # 21 Chicago 13
14. 1982 - # 9 Chicago 16
15. 1984 - # 4 Chicago 17
16. 1987 - # 35 Chicago 18
17. 1988 - # 37 Chicago 19
18. 1989 - # 37 Greatest Hits: 1982-1989
19. 2002 - # 38 The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning

Chicago's TOP 10 Albums

01. 1970 - # 4 Chicago II
02. 1971 - # 2 Chicago III
03. 1972 - # 3 Chicago at Carnegie Hall
04. 1972 - # 1 Chicago V
05. 1973 - # 1 Chicago VI
06. 1974 - # 1 Chicago VII
07. 1975 - # 1 Chicago VIII
08. 1975 - # 1 Chicago IX: Greatest Hits
09. 1976 - # 3 Chicago X
10. 1977 - # 6 Chicago XI
11. 1982 - # 9 Chicago 16
12. 1984 - # 4 Chicago 17

Chicago's Number One Albums

01. 1972 - # 1 Chicago V
02. 1973 - # 1 Chicago VI
03. 1974 - # 1 Chicago VII
04. 1975 - # 1 Chicago VIII
05. 1975 - # 1 Chicago IX: Greatest Hits

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 19:23pm


Chicago: Who Wrote What

Written by Keith Howland

01. Back To You

Written by DaWayne Bailey

01. Stone of Sisyphus

Written by Laudir De Oliveira

01. Life Is What It Is

Written by Donnie Dacus

01. Aint It Time
02. Must Have Been Crazy

Written by Walter Parazaider

01. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
02. Travel Suite: Free Country
03. Aire
04. Devil’s Sweet
05. Window Dreamin’
06. Get On This

Written by Lee Loughnane

01. Call On Me
02. Together Again
03. This Time
04. Take A Chance
05. No Tell Lover
06. Wndow Dreamin'
07. Stone of Sisyphus
08. Child's Prayer

Written by Danny Seraphine

01. Motorboat To Mars
02. Lowdown
03. Prelude To Aire
04. Aire
05. Devil’s Sweet
06. Take Me Back To Chicago
07. Prelude (Little One)
08. Little One
09. The Greatest Love On Earth
10. Take A Chance
11. Ain’t It Time
12. No Tell Lover
13. Show Me The Way
14. Street Player
15. Aloha Mama
16. Birthday Boy
17. Thunder and Lightning
18. Sonny Think Twice

Written by Terry Kath

01. Introduction
02. Free Form Guitar
03. The Road
04. In The Country
05. Prelude
06. A.M. Mourning
07. P.M. Mourning
08. Memories of Love
09. 3rd Movement
10. I Don't Want Your Money
11. Travel Suite: Free Country
12. An Hour In The Shower: A Hard Risin' Morning Without Breakfast
13. An Hour In The Shower: Off To Work
14. An Hour In The Shower: Fallin' Out
15. An Hour In The Shower: Dreamin' Home
16. An Hour In The Shower: Morning Blues Again
17. Alma Mater
18. Jenny
19. Beyond All Our Sorrows
20. Song of the Evergreens
21. Byblos
22. 'Til We Meet Again
23. Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
24. Sixth Sense
25. Once Or Twice
26. Hope For Love
27. Your Love's An Attitude
28. Mississippi Delta City Blues
29. Takin' It On Uptown

Written by Peter Cetera

01. Where Do We Go From Here?
02. What Else Can I Say?
03. Lowdown
04. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
05. In Terms Of Two
06. Happy Man
07. Wishing You Were Here
08. Anyway You Want
09. Hideaway
10. Mama Mama
11. If You Leave Me Now
12. Baby, What A Big Surprise
13. Little Miss Lovin’
14. Gone Long Gone
15. No Tell Lover
16. Mama Take
17. Loser With A Broken Heart
18. Upon Arrival
19. Song For You
20. Where Did The Lovin’ Go?
21. Hold On
22. Overnight Café
23. Thunder and Lightning
24. Bad Advice
25. Rescue You
26. Hard To Say I’m Sorry/Get Away
27. Love Me Tomorrow
28. Stay the Night
29. Along Comes a Woman
30. Prima Donna
31. Remember the Feeling
32. You're the Inspiration

Written by James Pankow

01. Prologue, August 29, 1968
02. Someday (August 29, 1968)
03. Liberation
04. Movin' In
05. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Make Me Smile
06. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: So Much To Say; So Much To Give
07. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Anxiety's Moment
08. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: West Virginia Fantasies
09. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Colour My World
10. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: To Be Free
11. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Now More Than Ever
12. Elegy: When All The Laughter Dies In Sorrow
13. Elegy: Canon
14. Elegy: Once Upon A Time...
15. Elegy: Progress?
16. Elegy: The Approaching Storm
17. Elegy: Man Vs. Man: The End
18. Now That You've Gone
19. Just You 'N' Me
20. What's This World Comin' To
21. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
22. Aire
23. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
24. Mongonucleosis
25. Brand New Love Affair
26. Old Days
27. You Are On My Mind
28. Skin Tight
29. 'Till The End of Time
30. Wish I Could Fly
31. Alive Again
32. Run Away
33. The American Dream
34. Live It Up
35. Bad Advice
36. Follow Me
37. What Can I Say
38. Only You
39. Once In A Lifetime
40. 25 Or 6 To 4
41. Free Flight
42. One More Day
43. God Save the Queen
44. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
45. Get On This
46. The Only One
47. Show Me A Sign

Written by Robert Lamm

01. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
02. Beginnings
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. Listen
05. Poem 58
06. Southern California Purples
07. Someday (August 29, 1968)
08. Poem For The People
09. Wake Up Sunshine
10. Fancy Colours
11. 25 Or 6 To 4
12. It Better End Soon: 1st Movement
13. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
14. It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
15. It Better End Soon: 4th Movement
16. Sing A Mean Tune Kid
17. Loneliness Is Just A Word
18. I Don't Want Your Money
19. Travel Suite: Flight 602
20. Travel Suite: Free
21. Travel Suite: Free Country
22. Travel Suite: At The Sunrise
23. Travel Suite: Happy 'Cause I'm Going Home
24. Mother
25. A Hit By Varese
26. All Is Well
27. Dialogue (Part 1)
29. Dialogue (Part 2)
30. While The City Sleeps
31. Saturday In The Park
32. State of the Union
33. Goodbye
34. Critic's Choice
35. Darlin' Dear
36. Something In This City Changes People
37. Hollywood
38. Rediscovery
39. Italian From New York
40. Hanky Panky
41. Life Saver
42. Woman Don't Want To Love Me
43. Skinny Boy
44. Never Been In Love Before
45. Harry Truman
46. Long Time No See
47. Ain't It Blue?
48. Another Rainy Day In New York City
49. Scrapbook
50. Gently I'll Wake You
51. You Get It Up
52. Policeman
53. Vote For Me
54. Hot Streets
55. Love Was New
56. Paradise Alley
57. Reruns
58. A Song For Richard and His Friends
59. Bright Eyes
60. Paris
61. Manipulation
62. Upon Arrival
63. Thunder and Lightning
64. I'd Rather Be Rich
65. Doin' Business
66. Soldier of Fortune
67. Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
68. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
69. Good For Nothing
70. Forever
71. 25 Or 6 To 4
72. Over and Over
73. I Stand Up
74. One From The Heart
75. Only Time Can Heal the Wounded
76. All the Years
77. Plaid
78. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
79. The Pull
80. Sleeping In the Middle of the Bed Again
81. Back To You
82. 90 Degrees and Freezing
83. Come To Me, Do

Written by Bill Champlin

01. Sonny Think Twice
02. Daddy's Favorite Fool
03. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
04. Remember the Feeling
05. Please Hold On
06. It's Alright
07. I Believe
08. Come In From the Night
09. Runaround
10. Somebody, Somewhere
11. Who Do You Love
12. Holdin On
13. Hearts In Trouble
14. Plaid
15. Cry For the Lost
16. The Show Must Go On
17. Bethlehem
18. Why Can't We
19. Where Were You
20. Already Gone
21. Better

Written by Jason Scheff

01. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
02. We Can Last Forever
03. What Kind of Man Would I Be
04. Runaround
05. If It Were You
06. What Does It Take
07. God Save the Queen
08. Man to Woman
09. Bigger Than Elvis
10. Mah Jongg
11. Let's Take A Lifetime
12. The Pull
13. King of Might Have Been
14. Caroline
15. Why Can't We
16. Love Will Come Back
17. Long Lost Friend
18. 90 Degrees and Freezing
19. Where Were You

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 20:02pm


The only reason Chicago is not in the Rock Hall is because of a personal vendetta. Jann Wenner, founder and editor of Rolling Stone Magazine, who is also on the voting committee for the Rock Hall, plus some other Rolling Stone writers wanted Chicago to drop the horn section, but they wouldn't do it. In an interview with Down Beat magazine in 1972, Chicago was asked what they think of Rolling Stone magazine and if they read it. Peter Cetera said he takes it with him to the bathroom and wipes his ass with it! These are the reasons why Chicago is not in the Rock Hall!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 20:16pm


I recently did research on the most deserving bands that are not in the hall and Chicago made #1 on my list. Its funny to see those billboard stats posted because when I saw them the first time I was blown away. Now when I see them posted here its funny because it makes the hall such a mockery, My list is posted at work and when ever people see the list the all repeat over and over in disbelief "These are the people NOT in the hall??" "Are you sure"?


Perhaps the most embarassing thing to the Hall I can think of is that this band is not in the Hall of fame. And it is compounded yearly with the grandmaster flash's- and bogus inductees that follow.
You can erect a building gather a group of writers with media pull and make all the presentations you want but the people cannot be fooled. We know who the forgotten greats are.
The real damage is the youth that may not know.
Go to the Hall look over the list of inductees and never see the name CHICAGO sitting there.

Posted by anthony on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 20:37pm


Why doesn't Chicago get an OVERSIZED BOOK about their career made for them?!

The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, The Who, and now Genesis have one!!!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 20:48pm


Oh, excuse me! You people at the Rock Hall are so elite and of a higher pedigree.

This is an excerpt from Miles Davis' biography at the Rock Hall. Notice the indirect reference to Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago in the last sentenced:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period. But his forward-thinking sensibility, insatiably curious muse and eagerness to move music into uncharted realms made him a contemporary musician, irrespective of genre. The bond he established with rock’s more inquisitive listeners at that time carried through to his death in 1991. Moreover, his career-long example of pushing the boundaries has influenced many of rock’s leading lights, particularly those who eschewed the status quo for musical explorations on rock’s more experimental tip. He possessed one of the most gifted and curious minds in music history, and compromise was not in his blood.

COMPROMISE!!

This is why Chicago is not in the Rock Hall!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.10.08 @ 07:49am


Only those who were in it during the 'Terry Kath years' should be inducted.

Posted by Paul in KY on Monday, 03.10.08 @ 07:48am


Chicago will get in after Blood, Sweat & Tears gets in.

Posted by Gregory Pietsch on Sunday, 03.23.08 @ 16:26pm


I've been a Chicago fan since the very beginning. Until recently I did not know the reason why they had not been inducted into the HOF. If in fact Jann Wenner is still carrying a grudge for a comment made 35 years ago, it is way past time for him to grow up or step aside. Without any doubt, Chicago should be in the HOF. The statistics talked about previously are reason enough. Looking at the inductees in the HOF, it is obvious that Chicago's omission is a travesty when compared to some of the jokes who have been inducted.

Posted by Perry on Sunday, 03.30.08 @ 22:18pm


HOW TO MAKE A 5-STAR CHICAGO ALBUM:

01. 6:35 Introduction
02. 3:22 Listen
03. 8:38 Poem 58
04. 6:11 Southern California Purples
05. 14:38 Liberation
06. 6:34 In The Country
07. 2:54 25 Or 6 To 4
08. 9:18 Sing A Mean Tune Kid
09. 4:58 A Hit By Varese
10. 7:14 Dialogue, Part 1 & 2
11. 10:07 Devil's Sweet

TOTAL TIME: 78:29

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.8.08 @ 16:09pm


Chicago should have been voted in years ago along with a few other groups that apparently in the same political boat.It's a real shame they are being snubbed!

Posted by Roger on Saturday, 04.12.08 @ 19:25pm


Chicago not being in is a traversty....they are obviously deserving! So some stupid writers wanted them to drop the horns? How stupid is that?

The whole HEART issue, isn't Nancy Wilson married to Cameron Crowe?? Gotta be some bad blood there too.

Posted by Beth on Sunday, 05.18.08 @ 01:13am


Chicago and B,S & T have to go in. Rappers, Madonna and groups with little or no musical talent got in and these guys aren't even considered...what a FARCE!! These groups along with the Moody Blues are OVER-Qualified anyway. With the Hall's mentality...it makes you wonder how the Ventures got in.

Posted by James Pankow Fan on Monday, 05.19.08 @ 12:51pm


Last year Jann Wenner gave herself (lol) a lifetime achievement award from the RRHOF... BWHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHA. Don't forget your cute little 'domestic partner' next year.

He's turning this place into a joke. Just because Peter Cetera says he only reads the Rolling Stone when he's 'taking a shit' and the powers that be at the Rolling Stone never really liked the horns, they decided that Chicago wasn't worth it.

Nice work, guys....and Jann :-P

Posted by Will on Tuesday, 05.20.08 @ 05:33am


Chicago's Stone of Sisyphus album comes out on June 17th.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 05.20.08 @ 16:30pm


Chicago: The Original 7
All will be inducted into the Rock Hall!

Terry Kath
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine

OTHER MEMBERS:
Who will and who will not be inducted?

Laudir De Oliveira - MAYBE!
Donnie Dacus - NO!
Chris Pinnick - NO!
Bill Champlin - YES! MAJOR WRITER! 25 YEARS WITH CHICAGO
Jason Scheff - YES! MAJOR WRITER! 25 YEARS ALMOST
DaWayne Bailey - NO!
Tris Imboden - NO!
Keith Howland - NO!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.25.08 @ 21:07pm


Start writing your letters

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation
Joel Peresman, President
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10104
USA

1-212-484-1754
http://www.rockhall.com

Terry Stewart
President of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(East Ninth Street at Lake Erie)

Museum Offices:216.781.ROCK

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.26.08 @ 07:36am


Compared to other bands like Blood, Sweat & Tears, King Crimson and Deep Purple, Chicago didn't really have that many members! They had 15! Only 9 of them played major roles and should be inducted!:

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff

And unlike the above mentioned bands, Chicago is the # 2 selling American band of all time! Only the Beach Boys are ahead of them! If The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac were inducted with all the major members they had, so should Chicago!

Out of all the bands from the 60s and 70s who are not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Chicago's exclusion is the biggest travesty!

BECAUSE THEY ARE CHICAGO!

THEY ARE NOT BOSTON, KANSAS, JOURNEY OR STYX!!

INDUCT CHICAGO NOW!

The # 2 AMERICAN BAND OF ALL TIME!!!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.29.08 @ 13:50pm


I think the GENESIS exclusion is a bigger travesty than the CHICAGO exclusion! CHICAGO comes in 2nd!

Posted by ytgg on Thursday, 05.29.08 @ 18:31pm


If Chicago ever sucked, you can blame it on the producers who would not let them make their albums the way they wanted to!

Chicago (1969-1979) did not suck!
Chicago (1980-2005) did suck!
Chicago (2006-Present)Many great things happening!:

All old albums remastered!

NEW ALBUMS

Chicago XXX
Chicago XXXII : Stone of Sisyphus

A Chicago DUETS album is on the way too!

Names being thrown around include Sting and Paul McCartney

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.30.08 @ 09:43am


INDUCT CHICAGO NOW!!!

Posted by Roy on Friday, 06.6.08 @ 08:24am


Chicago's best songs were never released as singles!!

01. 6:35 Introduction
02. 3:22 Listen
03. 8:38 Poem 58
04. 6:11 Southern California Purples
05. 14:38 Liberation
06. 6:34 In The Country
07. 9:18 Sing A Mean Tune Kid
08. 4:58 A Hit By Varese
09. 10:07 Devil's Sweet

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 06.7.08 @ 09:21am


Other great Chicago songs that were not singles include:

Poem For The People
Happy Cause I'm Going Home
Als is Well
While The City Sleeps
State of The Union
Goodbye
Something In This City Changes People
Happy Man
Song Of The Evergreens
Oh Thank You Grea Spirit

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Sunday, 06.8.08 @ 02:44am


Chicago (1969-1979) The Billboard Top 40 Hits

01. Beginnings
02. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. Make Me Smile
05. Colour My World
06. 25 Or 6 To 4
07. Free
08. Lowdown
09. Dialogue (Part 1 & 2)
10. Saturday In The Park
11. Just You 'n' Me
12. Feelin' Stronger Every Day
13. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
14. Wishing You Were Here
15. Happy Man
16. Call On Me
17. Harry Truman
18. Old Days
19. Another Rainy Day In New York City
20. If You Leave Me Now
21. Baby, What A Big Surprise
22. Alive Again
23. No Tell Lover
24. Street Player

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.8.08 @ 08:41am


It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period.


Totally false and inane comment. If he really believes that, he's ignorant about Miles' music of that period.

I think the writer was trying to imply that BS&T and Chicago didn't get in because being a major proponent of a music style that was "briefly popular" doesn't qualify them for the RRHOF and rationalized Miles getting in by claiming that he didn't play this kind of music anyway.

It's a pretty ridiculous reach, IMO.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.15.08 @ 14:21pm


Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus released today!!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.17.08 @ 12:41pm


Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus released today!!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.17.08 @ 12:41pm


Start writing your letters!

Tell the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to induct Chicago!

Give them the whole history! Nice and long!

Joel Peresman, President
The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10104
USA

1-212-484-1754
http://www.rockhall.com

Terry Stewart, President
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(East Ninth Street at Lake Erie)

Museum Offices:216.781.ROCK

Rollingstone Main Offices
1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10104-0298
Phone - 212-484-1616
Direct-Response Advertising: 212-484-3469

Compared to other bands like Blood, Sweat & Tears, King Crimson and Deep Purple, Chicago didn't really have that many members! They had 15! Only 9 of them played major roles and should be inducted!:

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff

And unlike the above mentioned bands, Chicago is the # 2 selling American band of all time! Only the Beach Boys are ahead of them!

When you write your letters to the hall make sure to be specific as to which members have to be inducted. As if they don't already know! Give a biography for each member.

All original 7 members of Chicago will of course be inducted, when they finally do get inducted.

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine

But out of all the replacement members and additional members, I think that only Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff should be inducted because they have been major writers and performers with Chicago. Bill Champlin has been with Chicago for over 25 years now, and Jason Scheff will hit 25 years in 3 years!

If Sammy Hagar was inducted into the Rock Hall with all the original VAN HALEN members, then Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff should and can be inducted into the Rock Hall with all the original Chicago members.

Chicago's versions of Gary Charron:

Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Chris Pinnick
DaWayne Bailey
Tris Imboden
Keith Howland

I don't think any of the other Chicago members should, can, or will be inducted because they were not with the group long enough and they didn't write much. It's not neccessary.

I'm jumping the gun here...

Who do you think would be the appropriate person to give the induction speech for Chicago? Should it be a predecessor, a contemporary, or a follower?

Al Green? Al Kooper? Brian Wilson? Philip Bailey? Herbie Hancock? Huey Lewis? Rob Thomas?

It would have to be someone who really knows how to talk. Someone who can really delve into the music of his or her generation and give a descriptive, explanatory, analytical speech about Chicago's 1969-1979 era and Jazz-Rock Fusion.

By the time Chicago gets inducted, it might have to be someone who isn't even in the music industry that gives the induction speech for them. An actor maybe! It's happened twice!

Robert Townsend gave the induction speech for The Dells in 2004. Tom Hanks gave the induction speech for The Dave Clark Five in 2008.

The person who I think should give the induction speech for Chicago, is probably also the only person at this rate who can get Terry Stewart, Joel Peresman, Jann Wenner, Jon Landau, Anthony DeCurtis and whomever else nominates and votes, to have Chicago inducted! I am writing a letter about Chicago to this person, and with the letter I am including the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and emails of all the big shots at the Rock Hall and Rollingstone magazine, so this person can contact them.

The person whom I speak of is a saxophone player.
This person whom I speak of also performed on the Arsenio Hall Show.
This person has played Chicago music at certain events he's held
Chicago also performed for this person.

Without further ado, here is my Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Scenario for Chicago:

Induction Speech: BILL CLINTON
Song that plays while Chicago is walking up to the stage: Beginnings
Chicago performance: Beginnings, Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?, Saturday In The Park

If Chicago doesn't perform: Earth, Wind & Fire or The Brian Setzer Orchestra, or The Cherry Poppin' Dadddies.

The majority of the people who attend the Rock Hall ceremonies are liberal. I'm pretty sure they would be happy to see Bill Clinton there.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 06.19.08 @ 10:14am


Now you are bringing Bill Clinton into the act. Maybe he can play his sax onstage. Please stop - we get your point.

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 06.19.08 @ 10:33am


From Rollingstone.com

Not to be confused with Boston or Kansas, Chicago forged a driving, horn-filled, white jazz-rock-soul sound before staggering into their later romantic ballad era, which eventually led to grizzled-geezer casino tours. Their many platinum-selling hits were catchy enough to stay in your head after just a glance at their title ("25 or 6 to 4," "Saturday in the Park," "You're the Inspiration").

Peter Cetera has provided the soundtrack to more sixth-grade slow dances than any other singer-songwriter in history. Odds are if he had a quarter for every time he sung the word "forever," he'd have another million dollars. High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera's tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn't strike you deep in your heart, it'll at least stick deep in your head.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.22.08 @ 16:30pm


Does this guy Roy ever give it a rest? I have always enjoyed Chicago but after reading his constant diatribes, I hope they never see the light of day.

Posted by blah-blah-blah on Sunday, 06.22.08 @ 16:53pm


Send Your Letters!

Joel Peresman, President
The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10104

1-212-484-1754
http://www.rockhall.com

Terry Stewart, President
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(East Ninth Street at Lake Erie)

Museum Offices:1-216-781-7625

Jann Wenner
Rollingstone Main Offices, 2nd Floor
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10104-0298
1-212-484-1616

Jon Landau Management
158 Rowayton Avenue
Rowayton, Connecticut, 06853
1-203-854-0528

Anthony DeCurtis
ADeCurtis@aol.com

I am going to keep sending these people my exact same letters once every year and annoy the hell out of them until they induct Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 06.23.08 @ 09:16am


Chicago (1969-1979) The Billboard Top 100 Hits

01. Beginnings
02. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. I'm A Man
05. Make Me Smile
06. Colour My World
07. 25 Or 6 To 4
08. Free
09. Lowdown
10. Dialogue (Part 1 & 2)
11. Saturday In The Park
12. Just You 'n' Me
13. Feelin' Stronger Every Day
14. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
15. Wishing You Were Here
16. Brand New Love Affair (Part I & II)
17. Happy Man
18. Call On Me
19. Harry Truman
20. Old Days
21. Another Rainy Day In New York City
22. If You Leave Me Now
23. Baby, What A Big Surprise
24. You Are On My Mind
25. Alive Again
26. Little One
27. Take Me Back To Chicago
28. Gone Long Gone
29. Must Have Been Crazy
30. No Tell Lover
31. Street Player

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.29.08 @ 06:56am


ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

HELP INDUCT CHICAGO INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME!

Chicago:

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff


There's a lot to cover. Bare with me.

Yes, Bill Clinton plays the saxophone. Bill Clinton performed on Arsenio Hall in 1992. Bill Clinton is a Chicago fan. Bill Clinton played Chicago's music at numerous events during his 1992 campaign for President. Chicago performed for Bill Clinton at the 1995 Presidential Gala.

I was asking myself who would be the appropriate choice to give the induction speech for Chicago. Should it be a predecessor, a contemporary, or a follower? The Beach Boys?, Earth, Wind & Fire?, Herbie Hancock?, Bruce Springsteen? Or maybe it should be someone who isn't even in the music industry who gives the induction speech for Chicago. It would have to be someone who really knows how to talk. Someone who can really delve into the music of his or her generation and give a descriptive, explanatory, analytical speech about Chicago's 1969-1979 era and jazz-rock fusion itself.

Actor Robert Townsend gave the induction speech for The Dells in 2004. Actor Tom Hanks gave the induction speech for The Dave Clark Five in 2008, which was absolutely amazing.

At this rate, it's going to take someone like President Bill Clinton to grab little Jann Wenner by his ear and tell him to grow up and induct Chicago into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Bill Clinton can sit right next to Jann Wenner at the ceremony and watch Chicago perform, the same way that Tom Hanks was sitting next to Jann Wenner when The Dave Clark Five, another band that Jann Wenner hates, were inducted!

I am writing a letter about Chicago to Bill Clinton, and with the letter I am including the names, addresses, telephone numbers, and emails of all the big shots at the Rock Hall and Rollingstone, so he can contact them and get them to nominate Chicago for The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. I'm pretty sure they would listen to him. In addition, I'm pretty sure all those liberals would love to have Bill Clinton sitting there with them at the ceremony.

In case you didn't know, artists who have already been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame also get to vote on who gets inducted each year. They get ballots in their mail boxes to fill out and return to the rock hall. So, Chicago is pretty much a shoe-in for the rock hall if only the nominating committee would nominate them.

I will also be mentioning Bill Clinton in my letter about Chicago to Jann Wenner, letting him know that he will be contacted by Bill Clinton! :twisted:

My Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Scenario for Chicago:

Induction Speech: Bill Clinton
Song that plays while Chicago is walking up to the stage: Saturday In The Park
Chicago performance: Beginnings and Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
If Chicago doesn't perform: Earth, Wind & Fire, or The Brian Setzer Orchestra, or The Cherry Poppin' Daddies
If Chicago's music is chosen for the All-Star Jam at the end of the ceremony: Free and 25 Or 6 To 4

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.1.08 @ 19:57pm


I am at a point that I don't want to see Chicago inducted just because of Roy. Hey Roy: Do you get paid by the word or by how annoying you are?

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 07.2.08 @ 08:10am


I am writing to inform you that you will be contacted sometime between now and the next four months by former U.S. President William Jefferson Clinton. Bill Clinton is very interested in being the one who gives the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction speech for Chicago—once they finally are inducted. If this is what it will take to get Chicago inducted, so be it! This would sure do wonders for your TV ratings and the ticket sales to the induction ceremony—having both Chicago and Bill Clinton there together.

Yes, Bill Clinton plays the saxophone. Bill Clinton performed on the Arsenio Hall Show in 1992. Bill Clinton is a Chicago fan. Bill Clinton played Chicago's music at numerous events during his 1992 campaign for President. Chicago performed for Bill Clinton at the 1995 Presidential Gala.

Who would be the appropriate choice to give the induction speech for Chicago? Should it be a predecessor, a contemporary, or a follower? The Beach Boys? Earth, Wind & Fire? Herbie Hancock? Bruce Springsteen? On the other hand, maybe it should be someone who isn't even in the music industry who gives the induction speech for Chicago. It would have to be someone who really knows how to talk. Someone who can really delve into the music of his or her generation and give a descriptive, explanatory, analytical speech about Chicago's 1969-1979 era and jazz-rock fusion itself.

At this rate, it's going to take someone like President Bill Clinton to get Chicago inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Bill Clinton can sit right next to you at the ceremony and watch Chicago perform. Chicago’s induction is long overdue. Induct Chicago now! Enough is enough!

Once again, you will be contacted by President Bill Clinton.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 07.7.08 @ 06:28am


Roy... Where do you come up with this stuff?

Posted by blah-blah-blah on Monday, 07.7.08 @ 08:15am


Are they not going to be inducted due to the fact that there are so many bad feelings between Peter Cetera and Chicago, because I understand they split up on very ugly terms and to get them together on the same stage is what they want to avoid?

Posted by jenny on Thursday, 07.17.08 @ 18:45pm


Dameon...while we're on the subject of unsung guitar heroes, I had brought up Terry Kath in a previous post. Now there was a cat who could flat-out PLAY!!! You never hear of him being mentioned with the usual greats, but he very well should be...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 07.20.08 @ 18:08pm


The only reason Chicago is not in the Rock Hall is because of a personal vendetta. Jann Wenner, founder and editor of Rolling Stone Magazine, who is also on the voting committee for the Rock Hall, plus some other Rolling Stone writers wanted Chicago to drop the horn section, but they wouldn't do it. In an interview with Down Beat magazine in 1975, Chicago was asked what they think of Rolling Stone magazine and if they read it. Peter Cetera said he takes it with him to the bathroom and wipes his ass with it! These are the reasons why Chicago is not in the Rock Hall!


Posted by Roy on Sunday, 07.20.08 @ 18:24pm


I have been a life-long fan of the group and consider myself very open to all genres of rock-n-roll. Chicago has released songs that fit into most every genre..jazzy, sincopated rhythms, ballads, driving rock and have adapted to the sounds of each decade they have played.

As far as past conflicts with people, whether it is Jann Wenner, Pete Cetera or James Guercio, the time has come to mend the fences. Geez...after 40 years you would think that there are more important issues in life than to carry bitterness around.

I think the hatchets need to be buried and Guercio, their original manager and producer, should give the induction speech. What better event for the Rock-n-Roll Hall of Fame than to have the reunion of all of these talents on the stage at the same time. Like Dean Martin appearing on the Jerry Lewis Telethon. What a monumental moment!

It is about time everyone grew up and decided life is way too short to carry resentment to the grave.

I will do my part to petition the HOF.

Posted by beancountr on Monday, 07.21.08 @ 15:29pm


Here is my email to the president of the HOF, Terry Stewart, followed by his response.

I hope this finds you all well.
I want to petition the induction committee to consider and accept the group Chicago into the Hall of Fame. It is long overdue. They are the number 2 band of success in America, only behind the Beach Boys (members of HOF). They have produced and sold hits that cross over into many genres of Rock-n-Roll, including jazz, ballads, driving rock, and unique syncopated rhythms. The collective talents of the virtuoso artists collaborated to create music that has affected 2 – 3 generations of listeners. They overcame the challenges of dealing with music producers/ managers that took advantages of their talents for personal gain, as well as the issues in the late 60’s and early 70’s dealing with copyright issues and royalties for original work. The group was so committed to their craft that they were willing to take reduced royalties in order to release double album LPs just so they could share their messages with the world.

It is rumored that there is “bad blood” between Chicago and Jann Wenner that keeps them from being inducted. Other rumors concern the relationship between the original group members and Pete Cetera. Even other rumors deal with grudges between the members of Chicago and Jim Guercio, their original manager / producer. As a fan, I don’t care about the bitterness and resentment individuals have between themselves and others. As adults I would hope that they have all come to the realization that a lifetime is a longtime to carry a grudge and that resentment never hurts the person it is pointed against, but rather the person carrying the resentment. If these people haven’t learned that lesson yet, it is time they did. Besides, the point of the Hall of Fame is to highlight artists that have made significant contributions to rock-n-roll music. How can the history of the music be complete without a mention of Chicago! Consider this. If an Anthology collection were to be put together for Chicago, as it was for the Beatles, the collection would be twice the size of the Beatles. Chicago had so much music inside them that they released more songs than (I guess) 90% of the members in the Hall currently.

Please, end the madness of excluding this group from the history of rock-n-roll, as taught through the Hall of Fame. Make this right!

I hope you have a wonderful day

Steve Cunningham,

A music fan!




Posted by beancountr on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 13:59pm


THE RESPONSE:

Thanks for your comments about Chicago. They are certainly a good choice. Here’s how the process works.

Nomination and induction into the Hall of Fame is not about popularity, records sales, which label the group is on, or anything other than the process below. The love for, the evaluation of, and the impact of any artist are subjective questions to be answered by the nominators and the voters. Unlike baseball, football, basketball or hockey, statistics are not relevant.

The entire nomination and induction process is coordinated by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation in New York City. Artists can be inducted in four categories: Performer, Early Influence, Non-Performer and Side-Men. The latter three categories are evaluated and decided by separate committees.

The selection of Performers is a two-step process. The only formal criteria for the performance category is that an artist has to have had their first record 25 years ago. That said, candidates are reviewed and discussed relative to their impact on this music that we broadly call rock and roll. The innovation and influence of these artists is also critical. Gold records, number one hits, and million sellers are really not appropriate standards for evaluation.

The formal selection of Performers begins with an extensive panel of journalists, historians, previous inductees, noted musicians, industry heads, etc. In turn, those nominated are sent to a committee of more than 500 people around the world (journalists, historians, music industry management, all living inductees, musicians, etc.) who vote. Those receiving the highest number of votes and more than 50% of the votes cast are inducted into the Hall. Usually, this means five to seven new performing members each year. All this said, you can see the road to being inducted is an arduous one and for the most part, removed from the realm of influences or politics.

Finally, as I noted above, everyone personalizes everything about rock and roll, when they are brought into the circle of discussion. As such, the definition of "rock and roll," who is or was important, and who should be inducted is incredibly subjective. Everyone believes themselves to be the “expert”. Unfortunately, there are no longer any absolutes when it comes to candidates. The Chuck Berry, Elvis, Little Richard, Beatles days are gone. Going forward, the controversy will continue. Having said that, I believe that all worthy candidates will be inducted, just not always when they or their fans deem timely. In fact, there's not only precedent in our history, but also with the sports halls of fame where many great stars do not get inducted in the their early years of eligibility, or for many years to come in quite a few instances.

Peace & Soul,
Rock & Roll!

Terry Stewart
President
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

P. S. I nominated Chicago last year. Unfortunately, they did not receive enough votes to make the final ballot. And no, there are no political issues or bad blood…just not enough votes.

Posted by beancountr on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 14:00pm


I propose the creation of a "grass roots" campaign to petition the 500+ members of the voting committee to vote for the induction of Chicago into the HOF.

Begin with finding "living inductess" through group/artists websites. Many musicians maintain web pages and MySpace sites that can be used as a petition platform.

In addition, bombard the local DJs and newspaper entertainment reporters, asking if they participate in the voting process.

Finally, research record company and talent management company websites and locate points of contact. Let's deluge them with emails insisting the induction of Chicago.

Is anyone with me on this?

Posted by beancountr on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 14:30pm


You can contact Chicago, Robert Lamm, Bill Champlin, and Jason Scheff on their MySpace pages. Earth, Wind & Fire is there too. Robert Lamm has his own profile on YouTube as well.

These are the Chicago and Peter Cetera messageboards:

wwwdotchicagothebanddotcomslashforumslash
chicagofansdotorgslashforumslash
ctachicagofansdotproboards21dotcomslashindexdotcgi
boarddotpeterceteradotcomslashindexdotphp

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 18:41pm


Artists who released their first single or album in 1980, have been eligible for induction since 2005. So far, these are the only artists from the 1975-1980 period who are in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame:

Michael Jackson, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, The Talking Heads, The Ramones, The Police, The Clash, AC/DC, Queen, Aerosmith, Elvis Costello & The Attractions, ZZ Top, Prince, Jackson Browne, Bob Seger, The Pretenders, U2, Blondie, The Sex Pistols, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Patti Smith, Van Halen, R.E.M., Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, John Mellencamp and Madonna.

Look for late 70s-Early 80s acts like Donna Summer, Chic, The Beastie Boys, RUN DMC, Afrika Bambaataa, Dire Straits, Sting, Don Henley, Steve Winwood, Stevie Nicks, Lionel Richie, Peter Gabriel, Phil Collins, Joy Division, New Order, The Buzzcocks, The Smiths, The Cure and Stevie Ray Vaughan to be inducted in the next few years. The nominating committee doesn't really like the 1980s music and considers it to be crap. Anyway, most of the important music during the 1980s was by artists from the 60s and 70s who were still making albums.

Artists who released their first album or single in 1990, won't be eligible for induction until 2015. So right now we are still only dealing with the artists from the 50s, 60s, 70s & 80s.

We've got 7 good years to look for a Chicago induction, before the 1990 artists become eligible.

2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015. That's 35 Inductees if they keep inducting only 5 in the performers category each year.

People like Seymour Stein of Sire Records and Little Steven from The E Street Band have said that they will continue to reach back and nominate artists from the 50s and 60s for induction. Look for The Five Satins, The Hollies, Herman's Hermits and Little Anthony and the Imperials to be inducted soon! This annoys many of the younger people at the Rock Hall, but I think having all these older members helps Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 05:38am


Without question, Chicago belongs into the RRHOF, but the hurdles are many and perhaps so high that a former President of The United States may not be able to climb over. The biggest hurdle is one word long...Ego.

I truly think Ego's and corporate culture has become the single reasons that a group that has sold so many songs, and records/cd's isn't in this body. The ego's are ( and im sure some will be upset with me on this) on both sides. But lets take the corporate culture issue first.

In the Music Industry, like any major industry, if one takes a mavrick route across the grain of acceptability or status quo,they are likely to become the least likely promoted/advanced ; this sadly I believe to be true here with Chicago.

Chicago believed strongly in thier creativity roots and stood up for them against the establishment; this may be a result of thier upbringing, thier influnce from the 60's culture on establishment; its likely that James William Guerico's ultra strong grip on the band in thier early years instilled in the group a " Never Again" attitude on being told what to play and what to record.

Its this approach that Record Exec's didn't like and still dont. Magazines like Rollling Stone, depend on partnenships with music recording companies and instrument companies for advertising, its thier lifeblood; if this partnership is damaged or non existant, then the Magazine is also non-existant.

So The Stone follows the corporate music and free thinking artist, and groups are targeted first by contract/label loss and then when nothing affects the artist/ group, then the legacy is attacked as it is here.

Now the ego part... Record Exec's,Managers, Labels, and Artist all have Ego's...The bigger the entity the bigger the Ego; when Ego's clash the results is loud and almost as big as the ego's in question.

Chicago, right or wrong, in letting Guerico go after Terry Kath's death, fired a shot across the establishment bow that they likely didnt believe to be a big deal; but it was. James William Guerico was an established manager/promoter who had many friends in the industry, his dismissal was an affront to the establishment and to someone who was connected(musically). Corporate Ego at work.

James Pankow is a talented musician, singer/songwriter and a nice human being; but James Pankow is passionate about his music, and isnt afraid to speak up and out when his work and the work of his fellow musicians in Chicago is affronted, either real or percieved. Mr Pankow's comments noted in this thread are form the heart, but when read by those who might vote to respect the body of Chicago's work, may work against the band.

I can see where Mr. Pankows heart and mind are, but I can see the view form the other side. Ego's across the lines and the results are saddening to all who love Chicago and thier great music.

Another sad commentary to this issue is the Ego's outside the box; Peter Cetera, the golden voice in back up and lead on so many great songs of Chicago's ( and one who influenced me musically so much) left the band after 18 years of great music. The Corporate Ego that worked against Chicago on the RRHOF has also hit Mr. Cetera as a solo act, in that despite a solid musician, he too has no record company, and that too is sad.

But equally sad is the what if; what if the RRHOF did put Chicago in, based on comments I have read, Mr. Cetera would not join the band to recieve the honor, something that is sad to all the fans who love both him and Chicago, sad for his wonderful and beautiful two daughters to see thier father with the men who shared the majority of his youth, and sad for us fans who would love to see them together again for just a single shining moment.

Ego's again at work...How sad. It's crazy that the Hall doesn't induct in a musical act that influenced so many people in so many ways; sad that some members already in the hall know Chicago is worthy and yet say nothing to mak it so.

Lives are all too short, the musical greats of yeaterday are starting to pass, some already gone, we dont have time for Ego's, and its time to Honor the craft, if not the men.

By honoring that craft, we must insist that Chicago be inducted, if not for anything else, then at least for the craft that Jimi Hendrix called " Gituarist better than I am"...what a statement huh?

Do it for Terry Kath...and lets bring in all who have made Chicago great...Laudir,Tris, Dewayne, Keith and those who helped along the way.

I have one final word for the RRHOF and all the Ego's who have blocked this bands place in History...Its summed up in a Chicago song...."IT BETTER END SOON"

Thanks for listening, and I hope I didnt offend anyone....

Bassplayer_525

Posted by Bassplayer_525 on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 05:43am


For those who don't read the "Press" section of the Chicago board, here is what Jimmy said last week to a newspaper reporter about the Rock-Hall:

Chicago brings horns to Plain Dealer Pavilion Tuesday
Friday, July 04, 2008
John Soeder
Plain Dealer Pop Music Critic

Chicago co-founder and trombone player Jimmy Pankow, 60, filled us in by phone recently from a tour stop in Harrisburg, Pa.

Q: Chicago has been eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for years, although you've never been nominated. What if anything would being inducted mean to you?

A: "If we were invited, I really don't know if we would give a [expletive], to be honest with you.

It's not only Chicago. There are other artists, like Neil Diamond and the Doobie Brothers, who are way overqualified, and they're not in the Hall of Fame.

It would be nice if induction was based on real accomplishments. If that was the case, we would've been in there years ago.

We're certainly qualified, 100 million albums later.

It's gotten to a point where it's almost laughable. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is really not an accurate representation of historically successful artists . . . to Jann Wenner's discredit."

[Wenner, publisher of Rolling Stone, is chairman of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation, which oversees the induction process.]

Since I posted Jimmy's recent comments above, I decided to transcribe Robert's talk about the Rock Hall situation to a disc jockey at WMJC radio in NYC on June 27th.
For the record, here it is....

DJ: I refuse...and I have this up on my website... to acknowledge the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame until they induct Chicago. How are you guys NOT in the Hall of Fame?

Lamm: I honestly don't know. I'm guessing it's... it must be something personal, although I have been told by members of the Board who I'm acquainted with that Chicago's name does come up year to year. We have kind of gone through the whole vetting process but we've just never made it through to number one.

DJ: It doesn't make any sense.

Lamm: Well, I don't get it either. I mean (giving) all due credit and respect to those who have been elected to the Hall of Fame, I don't disagree with any of those choices, but I certainly think Chicago deserves to be alongside all of them.

DJ: Absolutely! I tell you, you don't need all that recognition to do what you're doing, still touring... it's been 40-some odd years... and you're going to go on
'til forever, right?

Lamm: That's the plan right now. The plan is to never stop.Chicago-911

On the above comments by Robert & Jimmy:

It was good to hear Robert confirm that Chicago's name comes up "year to year" for consideration in the early stages of the process.

The real problem IMHO is that the Rock Hall has a glut of noteworthy candidates, but they've only inducted on average 5-7 artists per year lately. The Hall has only existed since 1986, if I recall the date correctly, so they have a lot of catching up to do.

Jann Wenner is so tied to the small number of yearly inductees that, when he replaced the Dave Clark Five with Grandmaster Flash in 2006, he refused to expand that year's winners by even one spot to induct both. (The DC5 did get in the next year.) Hopefully, they'll be more flexible in the future.

Along with fans of other groups, we're not alone in our frustrations with the Hall.

The BAND knows they belong.

And WE know they belong.

And, despite Jimmy's suggestion that the band might not care by the time they'd be inducted,
I certainly hope they'd be honored for the most obvious reason:
THEY BELONG IN THE ROCK HALL!!!

Question is: With all the different decades the Rock Hall has to choose from, when will Chicago work their way up. All I know about the upcoming (2009) class is what I saw in an article,
that The Hollies may have the inside track for inclusion, so one spot is likely filled already.

Hey, Rock Hall: All we want is for the band to be inducted before they need wheelchairs
to attend the ceremony!

Posted by Briangator on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 05:47am


Roy,

Aerosmith, Jackson Browne, Michael Jackson, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Queen, Bonnie Raitt, Bob Seger and ZZ Top were all eligible prior to 2000.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 14:08pm


I have been a fan of Chicago since 1989, when I was first getting into music. I don't think I am alone when I say their music has been a soundtrack to my life. Chicago has, and always will be, a band without peer. Go back and listen to a song like "Introduction" on Chicago Transit Authority or the "Ballet for a Girl In Buchannon" on Chicago II. Each layer of those songs is so rich, so deep, it was like a work of fine art. The work of Terry Kath on guitar and Cetera's bass work is highly underrated. They are never given the credit they deserve. It goes to other bands of that time like Zep or Hendrix. The horns are like another voice. And Lamm, Kath and Cetera each had a unique vocal style. It is such a shame that a band who has sold 120 million and counting albums is not given their just desserts. Many younger people who listen to Led Zep or Pink Floyd or Sabbath just don't know what kind of music Chicago made in the late 60's and early to mid 70's. If they would go back and listen to CTA, they would be shocked. Instead, when they hear Chicago, they think of "Look Away" and "You're the Inspiration", which aren't bad. They just aren't "cool" by today's standards. So Chicago is thrown into the trash folder and overlooked. Thanks a lot, Jann Weiner! And I am being nice just calling him a weiner. I can think of a lot meaner words than that...including two that end with -ck and head!

Posted by JT on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 18:36pm


"Chicago has, and always will be, a band without peer."-JT

If go you back and read a few of the more recent comments, particularly on the Blood, Sweat, and Tears page, you'll see that particular statement is a bit of a stretch.

Posted by Gitarzan on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 19:21pm


Not only did Terry Kath admire Hendrix, Hendrix admired Terry Kath

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 19:55pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis and nearly killed off Jeff Beck.

—Rolling Stone


"Blood, Sweat and Tears is embarrassing to me. They try to be so hip, they're not ... I know what they try to do: they try to get Basie's sound with knowledge."

—Miles Davis

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 19:58pm


Aaron...true statement!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 19:59pm


The Morning Comes: An Analysis of Peter Cetera

After careful examination of a handful of your songs, I have come to two conclusions about you, Mr. Cetera. The first conclusion is that you had been planning your departure from Chicago even before you were asked to join the band. Chicago was a tool that you used to make a name for yourself in order to be able to have a solo career later on in the future. You were never planning on staying with Chicago. During your seventeen years with Chicago, you kept your desire to leave the band all bottled up inside of you. You were not sure how you were going to tell your bandmates that you wanted out. Your only outlet was your music. You had hidden messages in the songs you wrote. When you wrote "If You Leave Me Now" and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" you were not thinking about a woman. What you were really thinking about were your bandmates from Chicago and how they would feel if you left them. Your song "Hard To Say I'm Sorry" was also a cry for help. It was your apology letter to Chicago, three years in advance. When you finally got the guts to tell your bandmates that you were leaving the band, baby, it was a big surprise to everyone.

On your second solo album, your first after leaving Chicago, appropriately and dramatically titled "Solitude/Solitaire" you included a song called "Big Mistake" which you had started writing while you were still with Chicago. Once again, I don't think you were thinking about a woman when you wrote that song either. What you were really thinking about were your bandmates from Chicago. Was it a big mistake to leave the band? You purposely made a pretty obvious reference in the song "Big Mistake" to the song "Baby, What A Big Surprise."

Quote: "Baby you might get a big surprise tonight" from Big Mistake

The second conclusion is that you are a person who does not dwell on the past. You are always looking to the future. It's either that, or you really like the phrase "the morning comes" which you use in three of your songs.

Quote: "Hold me 'til the morning comes" with Paul Anka

Quote: "He'll be gone when the morning comes" from Big Mistake

Quote: "When the morning comes and it's time to go start another day" from Daddy's Girl

Posted by RoughhWolf on Monday, 07.28.08 @ 05:33am


Popstrology: The Art and Science of Reading the Pop Stars:

What's Your Sign? Use the Pop Music Charts to Reveal Your Personality Traits, Guide Your Relationships, and Discover Your True Destiny.

By Ian Van Tuyl and Owen Grover, 2004

Page 123: Chicago - You may not deliver thrills, but you sure deliver value.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock (AOR) format that launched them, the first four released by the band called Chicago comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 LPs in a little less than thirty months, and if you factored that into your Birthstar's already staggering album-sales figures, you might find that in terms of sheer tonnage, Chicago shipped more vinyl than any other American rock band in the 1970s. Not bad for a band that could have walked through O'Hare Airport at the height of their success without attracting so much as a single screaming fan. That's not because their fans didn't love them, but because total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their albums. It would turn out in the end, of course, that the incredibly accomplished and hardworking musicians who had chosen so admirably to prosper as seven anonymous dwarves had been harboring a would-be Snow White in their midst all along. Peter Cetera was his name, and as soon as his name became well known to those who loved his high tennor voice, he was asked to leave a hive that was perfectly happy not to have a queen. "Team player" may sound like faint praise sometimes, but find the right team to play with and you'll realize your true power.

Lasting, Massive, Whitebread, Familiar, Not Sexy

Constellations: Launching Pad, Lite & White

Birthsongs: #1 Hits

If You Leave Me Now - October 17-30, 1976
Hard To Say I'm Sorry - September 5-18, 1982
Look Away - December 4-17, 1988


Page 117: Peter Cetera - You are the glorious butterfly who's reluctant to emerge from the cocoon.

What Michael McDonald and Lionel Richie were to the Doobie Brothers and the Commodores, Peter Cetera was to Chicago: the man who found his true voice while teaching his former group how not to rock. It took your Birthstar 17 albums with Chicago before he worked up the nerve to go solo, but when he finally did, his timing couldn't have been more perfect. The year was 1986, the constellation Reaganrock was in its ascendancy, and Kenny Loggins was simply too busy to record every single movie sound track, which left Karate Kid, Part 2 to Cetera and his Glory of Love. And if your Birthsong's bombastic Whitebread grandeur seems indistinguishable from Chicago's 1982 #1 Hard To Say I'm Sorry, it only goes to show you (a) the degree to which Cetera had transformed his former group by the end of his tenure and (b) the enduring appeal of a full-tilt, over-the-top power ballad in the hands of an uninhibited master. If you sometimes feel like renting the entire film oeuvre of Ralph Macchio and staying up all night to watch it, that's just popstrology at work. Because like your Birthstar himself, you are the type who understands the importance of the word "sometimes" in the edict that less is sometimes more.

Massive, Whitebread, Familiar, Not Sexy, Forgotten

Constellations: Spin-Off, Reaganrock, Theme Singer

Birthsong: #1 Hit

Glory of Love - July 27-August 9, 1986


Page 118: Peter Cetera and Amy Grant - You might actually be a saint, but to someone you're a sinner.

It's extremely difficult to imagine Peter Cetera as a defiler of a pious and virtuous young woman, but that's exactly how many of Amy Grant's biggest fans saw him when he tempted her into a popstrological Power Couple in late 1986. Ms. Grant wasn't a pop singer, you see--she was a singer of gospel and Christian Contemporary with a devout following that bought her records in the millions and viewed her move away from their chosen genre as a true fall from grace. You are too young to remember, but as powerful as the constellation Reaganrock was in the 1980s, its watered-down sound was still demon rock and roll to some, and not just a lunatic fringe. These were the years after all, in which Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority was at the apex of its powers, and devotees of his brand of Christianity viewed Ms. Grant's crossover as a grim portent indeed. And perhaps their fears were well founded, for not three months after you were born, the taint of sin was shockingly revealed even within the holy confines of the Praise the Lord Ministries, whose leader Jim Bakker provided America with what historians may someday call the first great scandal of the modern media age. As a child of Peter Cetera and Amy Grant, you are unlikely to be viewed as an iconoclast, and yet your capacity for toppling dubious icons through seemingly innocent actions is popstrologically unquestionable.

Whitebread, Familiar, Not Sexy, Forgotten, Minor

Constellations: Power Couple, Reaganrock

Birthsong: #1 Hit

The Next Time I Fall - November 30-December 6, 1986

Posted by RoughhWolf on Monday, 07.28.08 @ 05:36am


I'm still looking for the first and second edition of the Rolling Stone Album Guide. I will post the reviews once I find them.

CHICAGO

Rolling Stone Album Guide, 3rd Edition, 1992

Originally known as Chicago Transit Authority, this long-running "horn band" could never lay claim to the jazz pedigree of Blood, Sweat & Tears. Chicago began life as a hard-working show band; musically adept young men with more nightclub gigs than rock festivals under their belts. Lacking the focus of a dynamic frontman, the group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue--and a marketing strategy. Chicago could boast several gifted commercial tunesmiths: guitarist Terry Kath, keyboardist Robert Lamm and bassist Peter Cetera all exhibit the knack at various points. Chicago seemed to be constant presence on the pop charts during the '70s, one Top Ten blending into the next. Gradually, the pumped up hippie pep rallies give way to gentle falsetto romance; occassionally, one of those creamy vocal hooks or pesky horn lines can stick. But how do you actually find "Saturday in the Park" among Chicago's numerous and unimaginatively titled albums?

Group Portrait points the way, while bravely arguing in favor of Chicago's historical importance. Spanning four stuffed-full discs, this 1991 box set communicates the full range of Chicago's ambitions. (Chicago II and Chicago III are double albums on vinyl; the whopping four-record solo fest Live at Carnegie Hall is overkill.) Presenting the failed protest suites and botched disco-era efforts along with oodles of golden oldies is accurate, but unflattering. The music on Group Portrait undercuts the eloquently stated claims of the liner notes; Chicago's boundary-pushing instrumentals conjure up visions (memories?) of a high school marching band wigging out on pot. For the less studious, the first Chicago's Greatest Hits album will suffice. If You Leave Me Now is a tight, beguiling mix of punchy early '70s fare ("25 Or 6 To 4," "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?") and borderline-saccharine late '70s love songs (like the title track). This is the Chicago album to get if you're only buying one, and a budget item at that.

Unfortunately, the '80s Chicago doesn't even have the horns going for it, really. Bland synthesized orchestration and an overreliance on sugary-sweet vocal harmonies completely ruins Chicago's Greatest Hits 1982-89. These surging, gutless power ballads make Peter Cetera and company sound like the Bee Gees with severe head colds. Watch out: the latter-day, Post-Cetera edition of Chicago is on its way to becoming a Beach Boy-style presence on the nostalgia circuit. Ask for "Old Days," from good old Chicago VIII-definitely, a band ahead of its times.

The Rolling Stone Jazz & Blues Album Guide, 1999

Chicago began its career as talented, enthusiastic musicians with jazz aspirations, a solid blues base, an ambitious composer/keyboardist in Robert Lamm and a capable group of soloists whose ensemble work overshadowed their individual virtuosity, a fact that the band’s clever arrangements didn’t make too obvious.

The first album is a gem of its kind, an exciting set that showcased the post-Hendrix lead-guitar work of Terry Kath, who carried the group instrumentally with hard-riffing support from the brass section and the strong rhythm section powered by drummer Danny Seraphine. Kath kept the intensity high on the follow-up, which featured more adventurous charts in service of lengthy suites that began to subject the band to charges of pretentiousness, a tendency that continued on Chicago III, where some good material and proficient playing couldn’t overcome the feeling of stagnation setting in.

Live at Carnegie Hall is a terrible album that exposed the band’s instrumental limitations to disastrous effect, a humiliation the players never overcame. Though Lamm tried to stop the band’s creative implosion with one of his most innovative songs, “A Hit by Varese,” (Chicago V), the presence of “Saturday in the Park” was the real augur of the band’s future direction.

Chicago devolved into a lounge act, the very type of band the group had begun its life parodying. After Kath—the closest thing to a virtuoso in the group—died in a gun accident, the band replaced him with Donnie Dacus, but it still lacked a strong lead instrumental voice. Though the muse didn’t completely desert the group, any attempt to maintain musical credibility outside of the pop world did.

The Rolling Stone Album Guide, 4th Edition, 2004

Doing for Roman numerals what Kiss did for lipstick, Chicago was the quintessential hippie-dad band of the '70s. These furry-headed guys employed a lot of horn players and dabbled in jazz-fusion schlock, but they were never as slimy as Blood, Sweat and Tears. Their forte was harmlessly groovy soft-rock hits like "Make Me Smile," "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," and everyone's favorite, "Saturday in the Park." They saved the indulgent flute-and-bongo solos for their album tracks, and rocked out in "25 or 6 to 4." They didn't have a star frontman: just a logo, goopy ballads, a little R&B grit now and then, smooth '70s lingo ("Can you dig it? Yes, I can!"), whimsi-cal shots like "Harry Truman," and a name that disguised how totally L.A. they were. It was a version of hippiedom for people who had to get up in the morning, although the quadruple-vinyl monstrosity Live at Carnegie Hall proved that Chicago could also sell to the burnout crowd. Robert Lamm sang the best hits, but Peter Cetera sang their best ever, 1977's enigmatic and slightly scary "Baby, What a Big Surprise."

Chicago actually gave its twelfth album a title, Hot Streets, clearly the act of desperate men in the throes of a crisis. "Alive Again" was a perky hit, but the verbal-album-title gambit was soon abandoned, and it was a transitional period for the band after guitarist Terry Kath accidentally killed himself playing with a handgun. By the next big hit, "Hard to Say I'm Sorry" in 1982, Chicago was barely recognizable: horns and Roman numerals gone, synthesizers and Arabic numerals here to stay, Peter Cetera's whine up top. The Chicago of the '80s was an easy-listening franchise that really could have used a stoned clarinet solo or two to liven things up. In the '90s, as the radio hits disappeared, the band continued to have success as a live oldies act. Night and Day was a big-band tribute; 25, a Christmas album. The best '70s hits are on 1975's Chicago IX, with the let's-paint-the-logo-on-the-wall cover. Most of the same songs appear on the Group Portrait box, the 2002 Rhino Best of Chicago (although in some inferior edits), and the 1983 If You Leave Me Now, which confusingly came out between Chicago 16 and Chicago 17. Predictions that Chicago could kick Boston's ass have yet to be tested empirically.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 07.28.08 @ 16:58pm


In Chicago's 16 years of eligibility, many Chicago fans have tried to move the unshakable opinion of Jann Wenner to try to get Chicago nominated. There was even a group of radio DJs that tried a few years back, but Wenner changed the nominating requirements that prevented the nominations from counting thus preventing Chicago's nomination.

The efforts of fans have been far less successful than that of those DJs.

The interview that Bob Sirott did with Walt, Lee, Jimmy, and their manager Peter Schivarelli for their temporary exhibit at the Chicago History Museum. They took some questions from fans and someone asked about Chicago not being in the RRHOF, and Schivarelli answered the question in great detail about the DJs who had tried to get Chicago inducted.

The requirements for who could be nominated weren't changed, but the requirements for who could do the nominating were... There are very few (if any) radio DJs with nominating power any more.

Posted by Perplexio on Monday, 07.28.08 @ 21:54pm


The Chicago Suites Collection

01. 30:36 Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon
02. 12:17 It Better End Soon
03. 21:11 Travel Suite
04. 04:10 An Hour In The Shower
05. 14:36 Elegy

TOTAL RUNNING TIME - 82:10

Yes, Companies are working on making CDs that fit more than 80 minutes. Soon it will be 90.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.29.08 @ 07:18am


CORRECTIONS!!:

The Chicago Suites Collection

01. 12:04 Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon
02. 12:32 It Better End Soon
03. 21:16 Travel Suite
04. 04:10 An Hour In The Shower
05. 13:04 Elegy

TOTAL RUNNING TIME - 63:06

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.29.08 @ 10:29am


INDUCT CHICAGO NOW!

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff
DaWayne Bailey
Tris Imboden
Keith Howland

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 08:02am


Roy...Even though their contributions to rock music can't be overlooked, the present regime down at the hall seems to feel otherwise. Until there are some wholesale changes I don't think they'll ever get in, along with some other most deserving artists.

Gotta make room for the hip-hoppers and bubble gum pop dance queens, ya know!! Better watch out, the Jonas Brothers are on the latest cover of Rolling Stone and Oprah thinks they're right up there with the Beatles...I can't believe she'd make such a absurd comparison!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 08:33am


Don't exaggerate. As long as they'll induct bands like The Dave Clark Five, there's still hope for Chicago. The number of hip-hoppers and dance queens inducted is still limited to two. And as long as they only induct deserving hip-hop and pop acts, there's still plenty of room for other genres to get nominated. They'll have a hard time finding nine influential or innovative rappers and pop singers every year!

Posted by The_Claw on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 10:26am


I don't think it's an exagerration at all. I don't know how old you are, but the DC5 made a lot more noise than people think. I'm not really sure what their beef is with Chicago, but there doesn't seem to be a light at the end of the tunnel. I think that the whole induction process has turned into a conundrum that's going to be difficult to remedy. It's going to be increasingly difficult to keep inducting from the 60's and 70's while they're letting people like Madonna in (who I feel had absolutely NO business being inducted) their first year of eligibility without looking stupid. They're going to get put on the spot on why "it took so long". They set a very bad precedent. It's not supposed to be a popularity contest, but who made the biggest impact with their influence and innovation on ROCK & ROLL MUSIC!! Does that term even ring a bell with anyone anymore??

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 11:28am


It is an exaggeration. Hiphoppers and female pop acts are quite rare in the hall of fame. One of each, to be exact. And so are mor recent acts. Only 25% of all the acts in the hall had their first record released in or after 1969, the year Chicago debuted. They hardly even begun inducting 70s acts! I don't see why the induction of Madonna would end that prematurely. She's not thát powerful.

Or do you mean that now they are inducting pop acts, they will forget the rockers? Well, they never intended to focus solely on rock music, and they never did. If they would, they would have called it the Rock Hall of Fame, not the Rock & ROLL Hall of Fame. But still, after inducting quite a lot of acts from other genres, including pop, soul, blues, funk, hiphop, country, disco, folk, beat, surf, reggae and jazz, they still found room to induct The Stones, The Who, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zep, Queen, AC/DC... Off course you'll never feel comfortable with the Hall of Fame if you only consider one type of rock 'n roll as the true form. Their range is much broader than yours.

The "what took them so long" remark is unavoidable, how hard they'll try. Don't forget they inducted three acts last year that began their career before Chicago. And there are more acts out there that were quite important to the history of rock & roll and began before '69. Just ignoring major, more recent acts so slightly less important, older acts can make it in, won't work. Those acts you ignored to get older acts in, will be the "what took them so long" acts of the future. I rather have them inducting the most important eligible acts than only chosing quite important acts just because some of their members are getting too old.

I admit, I too have my problems with the nominating committee. They rarely nominate the nine most important eligible acts, and some very influential acts have been ignored for too long. But I feel that that has more to do with a bias against some music genres than an effort to induct as many 'popular' acts as they can. If that was the case, Chicago, one of the most succesful groups in the U.S. in terms of record sales, would have been inducted a long, long time ago. If it really was a popularity contest, how on earth could Leonard Cohen have beaten Donna Summer and The Beastie Boys? Kudos to Leonard (what took them so long?), he completely deserves induction, but I doubt he's the more popular one.

Posted by The_Claw on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 19:18pm


To me, rock & roll is simply rock & roll, and I do realize it has a lot of stepchildren (aka subgenres). The direction they seem to be going would be veering more toward calling it the "Popular Music Hall Of Fame", which would go back a lot farther than the 50's. I just don't want to see it become diluted. Being inducted should really mean something. Rock & Roll (which "Rock" is just short for) to me, anyway, just has a different feel to it than anything else. To me, "pop" is it's own genre, along with rap/hip-hop, country, etc...I know you'll probably think that would thin out the selection, but in a way, it should. I also know that with that mindset even someone like SRV getting inducted would be questionable because he was a BLUES player. It's a touchy subject, and I certainly don't have the correct answer for it. I just hate seeing derserving artists who, in my opinion, are the essence of Rock being overlooked.

Claw...I respect and acknowledge your opinions and appreciate your input.

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 08.3.08 @ 21:01pm


"Claw...I respect and acknowledge your opinions and appreciate your input."
The feeling is mutual. You put into words what many people think and feel about the RnRHOF, but you know how to do it in a way that is both well-argumented and respectful. We maybe disagree on a couple of points, but I think we both can agree that the way the induction process works right now isn't a great one. I hope that in 2010, when they'll have an induction ceremony for the 25th time, they'd do something special, like doubling the number of nominees and inductees, so some notable omissions could finally get what they deserve.

Posted by The_Claw on Monday, 08.4.08 @ 07:54am


They'll get in. I noted earlier that the voting committee is plunging into the waters of the decade (the 80's) that made them want to create this thing in the first place. Faced w/ the hideous combo of British synthesizers and American hairspray (as they may or may not see it) the reaction will be one of two things:

1. They'll follow the lead of Stave Van Zandt and take refuge in the 60's. This will expose the fact that all they ever really wanted was a 60's museum in the first place, and everyone from the Strawberry Alarm Clock to the Blues Magoos will start to show up on the ballots.

2. They will be swayed by the younger voting voices and the younger acts they've already put in (if U2 & REM can still be considered young!) and stay within the 70's, at least until Seattle shows up on the radar.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 08.4.08 @ 19:12pm


Cheesecrop (I'll bet there's a story behind your moniker...)...That's definitely one way to look at it that hasn't been broached yet. Was I right in using the word "conundrum"???

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 08.4.08 @ 19:30pm


Okay...here is my effort. I did write Paul Schaffer via the CBSMailbag@aol.com regarding Chicago and the Hall, since he is a voting member.

In addition, below is a form letter I am going to send out to as many voting members or other recording icons that I can contact, including legendary DJs and media reporters.

After the letter, I will list 3 addresses of some big names (you should recognize). What is the forum's input to sending multiple copies of this letter to these three names, all from various Chicago fans? Let me know your thoughts.

I hope this letter finds you well.

I am writing you inform you of a “grass roots” effort that has been formed to contact voting members of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The issue we want to bring to light is the exclusion of the group Chicago from the Hall’s inductees. I understand that record sales and chart numbers don’t drive the inclusion / exclusion decisions, that there are other contributing factors considered. However, looking at the longevity of this group and its impact on introducing different styles of music to a host of listeners (rock jazz, ballads, driving rock, Latin rhythms, and pop) I believe their impact on the history of rock and roll is too great to be overlooked.

When compared to some of the other inductees I have concerns regarding the factors that are considered. I have never viewed Madonna’s music to be Rock and Roll, but rather pop. So, the type of music a musician or group of musicians played must not be a large factor to consider. I don’t wish to take away from the contributions the current inductees have made. I am more curious to know why Chicago has been excluded. What did they fail to accomplish that, if done, would put them into the Hall? I received an email from Terry Stewart, President of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum recently. He assured me that there the exclusion was not related to any political or personal vendettas, but only the lack of sufficient votes.

So, with that said, here we stand, asking a group of distinguished musicians, icons in the industry, to join us in this effort. Please, help us to correct this situation while the members of the group are still around to appreciate the recognition. I implore you to do your part, what ever you can, to add a missing piece to the history of Rock and Roll, by placing Chicago amongst the great musicians of our time.

Sincerely,


TABLE 1

Members of Chicago to induct to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff

the three addresses:

Irving Azoff
3500 W Olive Ave
Burbank, CA 91505-4628

Clive Davis
745 5th Ave
New York, NY 10151-0001

David Foster
3300 Warner Blvd
Burbank, CA 91505-4632

Posted by beancountr on Tuesday, 08.5.08 @ 05:10am


ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

HELP INDUCT CHICAGO INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME!

Chicago:

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff

Send Your Letters to the Following:

Joel Peresman, President
The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame Foundation
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10104
1-212-484-1754

Terry Stewart, President
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(East Ninth Street at Lake Erie)

Jann Wenner
Rollingstone Main Offices, 2nd Floor
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10104-0298
1-212-484-1616

Jon Landau Management
158 Rowayton Avenue
Rowayton, Connecticut, 06853
1-203-854-0528

Irving Azoff
3500 W Olive Ave
Burbank, CA 91505-4628

Clive Davis
745 5th Ave
New York, NY 10151-0001

David Foster
3300 Warner Blvd
Burbank, CA 91505-4632

President Bill Clinton contact info

Mailing address
New York Office:

William J. Clinton Foundation
55 West 125th St.
New York, New York 10027
1-212-348-8882

Boston Office:
383 Dorchester Avenue, Suite 400
Boston, MA 02127

Clinton Presidential Center & Foundation Offices in Little Rock:
1200 President Clinton Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72201


THIS IS THE LETTER THAT I MAILED TO JANN WENNER, JOEL PERESMAN, TERRY STEWART, JON LANDAU, AND ANTHONY DECURTIS:

I am writing to inform you that you will be contacted sometime between now and the next four months by former U.S. President William Jefferson Clinton. Bill Clinton is very interested in being the one who gives the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction speech for Chicago—once they finally are inducted. If this is what it will take to get Chicago inducted, so be it! This would sure do wonders for your TV ratings and the ticket sales to the induction ceremony—having both Chicago and Bill Clinton there together.

Yes, Bill Clinton plays the saxophone. Bill Clinton performed on the Arsenio Hall Show in 1992. Bill Clinton is a Chicago fan. Bill Clinton played Chicago's music at numerous events during his 1992 campaign for President. Chicago performed for Bill Clinton at the 1995 Presidential Gala.

Who would be the appropriate choice to give the induction speech for Chicago? Should it be a predecessor, a contemporary, or a follower? The Beach Boys? Earth, Wind & Fire? Herbie Hancock? Bruce Springsteen? On the other hand, maybe it should be someone who isn't even in the music industry who gives the induction speech for Chicago. It would have to be someone who really knows how to talk. Someone who can really delve into the music of his or her generation and give a descriptive, explanatory, analytical speech about Chicago's 1969-1979 era and jazz-rock fusion itself.

At this rate, it's going to take someone like President Bill Clinton to get Chicago inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Bill Clinton can sit right next to you at the ceremony and watch Chicago perform. Chicago’s induction is long overdue. Induct Chicago now! Enough is enough!

Once again, you will be contacted by President Bill Clinton.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 08.6.08 @ 08:56am


Bands with more than 9 members in the Rock Hall - ALL INDUCTED

Parliament-Funkadelic - 16
The Grateful Dead - 12

Parliament-Funkadelic
Induction Year: 1997
Induction Category: Performer

Inductees: George Clinton (vocals; born July 22, 1940), Jerome “Bigfoot” Brailey (drums; born August 20, 1950), William “Bootsy” Collins (bass, vocals; born October 26, 1951), Raymond Davis (vocals; born March 29, 1940), Tiki Fulwood (drums, vocals; born May 23, 1944), Glenn Lamont Goins (vocals, guitar; born tk, died 1978), Michael Hampton (guitar; born November 15, 1956), Clarence “Fuzzy” Haskins (vocals; born June 8, 1941), Eddie Hazel (guitar, vocals; born April 10, 1950, died 1992), Walter “Junie” Morrison (keyboards, synthesizers; born tk), Cordell “Boogie” Mosson Jr. (bass; born October 16, 1952), William “Billy Bass” Nelson Jr. (bass; born January 28, 1951), Gary Shider (vocals, guitar; born July 24, 1953), Calvin “Thang” Simon (vocals; born May 22, 1942), Grady Thomas (vocals; born January 5, 1941), Bernie Worrell (keyboards, vocals, born April 19, 1944)

The Grateful Dead
Induction Year: 1994
Induction Category: Performer

Inductees: Tom Contanten (keyboards; born March 19, 1944), Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals; born August 1, 1942, died August 9, 1995), Donna Godchaux (vocals; born August 22, 1945), Keith Godchaux (keyboards; born July 14, 1948, died July 21, 1980), Mickey Hart (drums, percussion; born September 11, 1943), Robert Hunter (lyricist; born June 23, 1941), Bill Kreutzmann (drums; born April 7, 1946), Phil Lesh (bass, vocals; born March 15, 1940), Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (keyboards, harmonica, vocals; born September 8, 1945, died March 8, 1973), Brent Mydland (keyboards, vocals; born October 21, 1952, died July 26, 1990), Bob Weir (guitar, vocals; born October 16, 1947), Vince Welnick (keyboards; born February 22, 1951, died June 2, 2006).

Robert Hunter (lyricist; born June 23, 1941)

They inducted the lyricist as a group member!

It's starting to look more and more like all of the members of Chicago will be inducted, maybe even Chicago's first producer, James William Guercio, who also played his instruments on Chicago albums. The Rock Hall might even decide to induct him in the Sidemen category or as a producer in the non-performers category. He can only be inducted into one of the three categories.

Chicago:

Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Chris Pinnick
Jason Scheff
Dawayne Bailey
Tris Imboden
Keith Howland

Send Your Letters to the Following:

Joel Peresman, President
The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame Foundation
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10104
1-212-484-1754

Terry Stewart, President
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum
1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44114
(East Ninth Street at Lake Erie)

Jann Wenner
Rollingstone Main Offices, 2nd Floor
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10104-0298
1-212-484-1616

Jon Landau Management
158 Rowayton Avenue
Rowayton, Connecticut, 06853
1-203-854-0528

Irving Azoff
3500 W Olive Ave
Burbank, CA 91505-4628

Clive Davis
745 5th Ave
New York, NY 10151-0001

David Foster
3300 Warner Blvd
Burbank, CA 91505-4632

President Bill Clinton contact info

Mailing address
New York Office:

William J. Clinton Foundation
55 West 125th St.
New York, New York 10027
1-212-348-8882

Boston Office:
383 Dorchester Avenue, Suite 400
Boston, MA 02127

Clinton Presidential Center & Foundation Offices in Little Rock:
1200 President Clinton Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72201

Posted by Roy on Friday, 08.8.08 @ 05:11am


I would be happy if just Terry kath got in.

Posted by Rob on Sunday, 08.17.08 @ 16:24pm


Chicago deserves Hall-of-Fame status although I'm not sure why any such quality would desire the one in Cleveland, especially with Jann Wenner at the helm.

Why Chicago? Let's start first with Terry Kath playing Hendrix before Hendrix AND BETTER! Hendrix called Kath HIS INFLUENCE! Then, go listen to the band from CTA to about '72. They had a consistent anti-Nam message along with premium musicianship and melody combined with a dazzling horn section written by Jimmy Pankow. That period alone should be enough as other inductees apparently only required a single release. I believe hey were also the first "rock band" to play Carnegie Hall.

But, as has been stated so often on these posts, you're closer to this Hall if you're furiously angry and can swear like a truck driver. Notice that I didn't add a single thing about musicianship.

Posted by Gig on Saturday, 09.6.08 @ 11:16am


According to MSN senior music producer Sam Sutherland, A number of perennial fan favorites long ignored by the Hall--Rush, the Moody Blues, Chicago--shouldn't raise their expectations, Sutherland says. Their disconnect with the critics and executives who dominate the nominating committee is still in strong effect. But he holds out hope for one long-overlooked legend, Neil Diamond.

Chicago is mentioned as a "holdover."

From a recent interview with Chicago:

Robert Lamm said: I have been told by members of the Board who I'm acquainted with that Chicago's name does come up year to year. We have kind of gone through the whole vetting process but we've just never made it through to number one.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.10.08 @ 06:50am


From the President of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum, Terry Stewart:

I nominated Chicago last year. Unfortunately, they did not receive enough votes to make the final ballot. And no, there are no political issues or bad blood…just not enough votes.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.10.08 @ 07:26am


It's September 23,2008 and once again Chicago is not a nominee. How can anyone take this organization seriously when one bitter man can carry such a vendetta and have so much power. It is astonishing that the 13th most successful group in the history of the Billboard charts is not even considered. Another sad day for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by C J on Tuesday, 09.23.08 @ 19:27pm


The HoF is a sham regardless of what it does or does not have.
Posted by William

Agreed,it's fun killing time here though,but yeah it's all bullshit.
RRHOF = A popularity contest = ing one big circle jerk.

Posted by Gary James CA on Monday, 09.29.08 @ 22:04pm


WHO THE HECK IS JANN WERNER? The first 3 albums should have instantly got them in. Yeah they mellowed out,,,but dang Terry Kath tore it up!

Posted by Bryan on Tuesday, 09.30.08 @ 12:47pm


I voted 'no' on Chicago's chances only because I know the Hall's politics and the way the comittee's tastes run.

It seems you have a better chance of getting in the hall if you only know three chords than if you are a band full of highly skilled musicians, some of whom *gasp* actually went to music school like Chicago.

Their first five studio albums were, both musically and creatively, some of the best ever made during the rock era.

However, all still got panned by Rolling Stone. Too bad they can't blacklist Jann Wenner!

Posted by Mike on Wednesday, 10.1.08 @ 13:29pm


It devalues the whole point of The Hall of Fame that Chicago have not already been inducted.

It's a disgrace and a gross injustice.

Posted by P Allen on Thursday, 10.2.08 @ 09:11am



I have always thought that the Chicago logo resembled a guitar. Any chance Chicago will get together with a designer and have electric guitars shaped like the Chicago logo, built. Hey, if Prince has guitars shaped like his symbol, why not Chicago?

Also, Chicago should get in contact with Mastercard. It would be neat to have credit cards with the Chicago logo on them. You'll have the option to pick from different colors and designs. If KISS has credit cards, so should Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 10.4.08 @ 20:56pm


A Chicago Guitar

http://images.yuku.com/image/gif/63325e7f30a58ed47630cf9f6682e0d02533b80.gif

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.5.08 @ 06:22am


A Chicago Guitar

http://photos-c.ak.facebook.com/photos-ak-snc1/v351/250/22/33403582/n33403582_32868042_1459.jpg

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.5.08 @ 06:49am




Roy...I don't think this guitar actually exists. By the appearance, it has a Fender headstock. Fender already has (or had) a Terry Kath signature Telecaster. Also, it only has twelve frets, which would make it very limited. Fender wouldn't make such an electric guitar...it wouldn't even make a good boat paddle! Furthermore, if he were alive, I seriously doubt Kath would endorse such an instrument.

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 10.6.08 @ 17:47pm


Wow, is this ridiculous? To say Chicago is not worthy of the R&R Hall of Fame is like saying Buddy Holly sucked. Will, you are an idiot. Although I am a Chicago 1-11 guy, the band has endured and lived on. I wasn't a ballad era guy. Killer brass, Peter Cetera on vocals and bass (voted top bass player, early 70's Playboy, Danny Serephine, drums, Downbeat Magazine early '70's, picked out by Buddy Rich as one of the best drummers, Terry Kath, one of the best guitar players ever (as they played warm up for Hendrix in '67/'68, it is well documented he said Kath was a better guitar player than him. He was.) I'll put him up against any one. Listen to Poem 58 on the first album. Listen to the rest of the album. Induction. Give me a break. The band changed over the years, but 40 years of constant music speaks loudly. I went to a concert several years ago. (I saw them in the Tery Kath days @ 10 times). Thought I would hate it. Bought two beers. Realized I had two beers sitting at my feet at the end of the show. Enough said. Do the research I speak of.

Posted by CTAMan on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 00:59am


The differences between Chicago and all those other bands that The Rock Hall and Rolling Stone hate is:

All those other bands like Boston, Kansas, Journey, Styx and REO Speedwagon, have always sucked!!

Chicago didn't always suck!

All those other bands are not top selling acts!

Chicago is!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 04:43am


Styx was the first band to have 3 consecutive platinum albums and was the #1 touring band for years in the early 80's. Journey also was a #1 touring band and has consistently been near the top of the charts in the early 80's as well as more recently. That doesn't mean those bands don't "suck," but PLEASE don't say they aren't "top selling acts." You just make yourself look like a Chicago-crazed crackpot.

Posted by prognosticator on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 13:05pm


The differences between Chicago and all those other bands that The Rock Hall and Rolling Stone hate is:

All those other bands like Boston, Kansas, Journey, Styx and REO Speedwagon, have always sucked!!

Chicago didn't always suck!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 04:43am
--------------------------------------------------
That's a rather subjective opinion there. While I'm not partial to some of the acts on the whole, I'll tell you right off that the best work of both Boston & Journey can compare favorably w/Chicago's best. While I probably do like more songs from Chicago, there has never been anything wrong w/"More Than A Feeling", "Wheel In The Sky", or "Any Way You Want It". "Hitch A Ride" is another favorite, and for my money at least, "Stone In Love" is an absolute gem. Chicago's got plenty of great stuff, and I don't want to go deeper into a full-blown recitation of their entire catalogs. I've no doubt there are others who feel the same way about Kansas, Styx, and Speedwagon as well.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 10.20.08 @ 17:54pm


Guess Roy is a big Chicago lover. So am I, but I agree w/ a comment made (somewhere above) by Dameon. After reading about 50,000 words and a lot of repeats, he does get to be annoying.

Yes, Chicago SHOULD be in the RHOF. No doubt. Thank you for pointing out the Wenner vendetta and the other reasons for the snub, which I did not know. Suggest you would do better however to leave politicians out of it. I love Chicago, but I hate Bill Clinton. If he were to give the induction speech I'd shut off my television - too many unpleasant memories of him wagging his boney finger in front of the camera.

Now I see RS, the magazine Peter Cetera "wipes his ass with," has gotten increasingly political. Guess Wenner must figure this new format makes for gravitas? He wants to be credible, yet he childishly harbors resentment toward Chicago, Quincy Jones, Hall & Oates, et al. Denies Neil Diamond also. That said, I do read his magazine anyway (don't use it for tp, its not good for that).

But now Roy really is right. Chicago is one of my favorites and they DO belong in the rock museum.

Posted by Telarock on Thursday, 10.23.08 @ 11:22am


Oops! I wish to retract my statement, "I hate Bill Clinton." Let's not be haters here. But bringing him into the discussion only causes distraction. Let me say rather, I'm not a fan of Bill Clinton, but probably would not turn off my television on account of him.

Posted by Telarock on Thursday, 10.23.08 @ 14:09pm


Most likely it's either going to be members of The Beach Boys or Earth, Wind & Fire who give the induction speech for Chicago. They have a history! Maybe Bruce Springsteen.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 10.23.08 @ 14:54pm


How would ya like to have Mike Love speak? Might prove to be Fun, Fun, Fun, til the Rock Hall took the microphone away! (smile)
http://www.futurerocklegends.com/blog_files/Mike_Loves_Induction_Speech.html

Posted by Telarock on Thursday, 10.23.08 @ 17:57pm


Roy, I'm still feelin bad. Like I messed up yor dream dude. One of these years Chicago will make it in (lets hope), and you should have yor dream induction speaker. But am thinking, if you hold out, maybe we could get a fresh new president - who actually has Chicago connections? That would really "Make Me Smile" baby!

Posted by Telarock on Friday, 10.24.08 @ 17:53pm


Can somebody please tell me what vile deed Chicago has done to the great and powerful Mr. Wenner to deserve their barring from the Hall?

Seriously, Chicago should be in for longevity alone. So what gives?

Posted by Randy on Wednesday, 11.5.08 @ 01:53am


Chicago simply rocked in the early years and lead the Nation in the latter years. They do deserve to be in the Hall. Now!! You listen to a song like "Introduction" and you hear what being a player is all about from the whole band, top to bottom. Come on, we all can't like all the music but with as many top selling LP's and Top Ten Tunes, PUT CHICAGO IN THE HALL OF FAME.

Posted by Lana on Wednesday, 11.5.08 @ 15:19pm


MSNBC's Morning Joe and the Racheal Maddow Show have been playing Chicago music althroughout the 2008 Election campaign and they are still doing it! They play Beginnnings, Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?, Saturday In The Park, 25 Or 6 To 4, and Old Days. Maybe this is a sign.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 11.6.08 @ 05:27am


The use of Chicago's music during the elections is merely because Obama is from Illinois, and the networks don't want to look to uncool or unhip in regards to their audiences.

Never mind that they almost invariably end up doing so.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Thursday, 11.6.08 @ 05:38am


Can somebody please tell me what vile deed Chicago has done to the great and powerful Mr. Wenner to deserve their barring from the Hall?
(Posted by Randy on Wednesday, 11.5.08 @ 01:53am)
------------------------------------------------
Has something to do w/Peter Cetera saying he wipes his ass w/Rolling Stone pages. But that was only after long-standing snub by Wenner's mag. Wenner or one of his toads actually thought Chicago might be better off if they lost their horns? Needless to say folks at RS never did "get" Chicago.
Also I checked Wilson&Alroy's reviews and they have never reviewed any Chicago albums. So they don't appear to be a critic-friendly group? It is perplexing!

The songs from "The Chicago Transit Authority" (a two-set, 1969) and "Chicago II" were so lyrically fresh and jam-packed musically - those 2 albums are out'n'out rock classics. They were great at least up til Terry Kath's death in 1978. Beyond that I don't know.

Vote "Yes" to Chicago. There's way too much talent and musical material there to keep blocking them out.

Posted by Telarock on Thursday, 11.6.08 @ 12:20pm


Chicago was the brainchild of Walter Parazaider, one of Chicago's horn players. It was his idea to start a 7-piece Jazz-Rock Fusion band. He was friends with Terry Kath and Danny Seraphine. Their band was The Missing Links. They played in night clubs. They met and added Robert Lamm, James Pankow, Lee Loughnane and Peter Cetera. They changed the band name to The Big Thing and then started recording as Chicago Transit Authority and then finally Chicago.

Chicago: The Original 7

Terry Kath (1967-1978)
Peter Cetera (1967-1985)
Danny Seraphine (1967-1991)
Robert Lamm (1967-Present)
James Pankow (1967-Present)
Lee Loughnane (1967-Present)
Walter Parazaider (1967-Present)

Other Members

Laudir DeOliveira (1973-1980)
Donnie Dacus (1978-1980)
Chris Pinnick (1980-1984)
Bill Champlin (1981-present)
Jason Scheff (1985-present)
Dawayne Bailey (1986-1994)
Tris Imboden (1990-present)
Keith Howland (1995-present)
Bruce Gaitsch (1995 only)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 11.23.08 @ 19:35pm


Chicago is legend. Can't believe they're not in. If Bach & Beethoven were alive in the 60's & 70's they would have been in Chicago

Posted by Holly on Monday, 11.24.08 @ 21:06pm


Not that all HOF members were hugely acclaimed, but... Chicago hasn't really racked up any major critical acclaim through the years (check out acclaimedmusic.net to see that). And, the 80s period, I think, hurt the group (even though I like some of the hits from that era). And, I don't really see a huge impact- i.e. groups that were influenced by Chicago, followed itslead, all that.

Posted by JR on Monday, 11.24.08 @ 21:12pm


Influence my a##! Who the hell did The Dave Clark Five influence!

This is all that matters: Contrary to popular belief, Chicago started JAZZ-ROCK FUSION, not Blood, Sweat & Tears or Electric Flag!!

As of 2008, Chicago is # 19 on the list of the all-time charting artists on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. This will continue to change as they release more albums. Chicago is # 13 all-time on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. This won't change anytime soon since the singles business is pretty much dead! Chicago will hold that # 13 position for many years to come.

All those other bands that Rolling Stone Magazine likes to lump Chicago in with, (as guilty pleasures) don't even come anywhere close to Chicago on the Billboard Charts:

Boston, Kansas, Journey, Styx, Foreigner, REO Speedwagon, Bon Jovi (NOWHERE CLOSE!!!!) Chicago was better than all of them!!

Chicago belongs with this group:

The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, The Who, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Genesis, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac

Chicago was the number one charting band of the 1970s. Elton John was number one overall.

Chicago is the second all-time charting American Rock band behind The Beach Boys.

Chicago is 5th all-time among bands on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

03. The Beatles
05. The Rolling Stones
10. The Temptations
11. The Beach Boys
19. Chicago

Chicago is 4th all-time among bands on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
10. The Rolling Stones
12. The Bee-Gees
13. Chicago

Chicago has sold 130 MILLION ALBUMS WORLDWIDE!

Chicago belongs in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame!

Who did Chicago influence? Their contemporaries, that's who!! You know, past inductees into the Rock Hall get to vote on who gets inducted each year. They get ballots in their mail boxes. So, Chicago is pretty much a shoe-in for the Rock Hall if only they would make the final ballot. We've got 7 more years before the class of 1990 beomes eligible.

INDUCT CHICAGO NOW!
INDUCTION SPEECH: THE BEACH BOYS or EARTH, WIND, & FIRE - CHICAGO TOURMATES!



Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 06:27am


From Rollingstone.com

Not to be confused with Boston or Kansas, Chicago forged a driving, horn-filled, white jazz-rock-soul sound before staggering into their later romantic ballad era, which eventually led to grizzled-geezer casino tours. Their many platinum-selling hits were catchy enough to stay in your head after just a glance at their title ("25 or 6 to 4," "Saturday in the Park," "You're the Inspiration").

Peter Cetera has provided the soundtrack to more sixth-grade slow dances than any other singer-songwriter in history. Odds are if he had a quarter for every time he sung the word "forever," he'd have another million dollars. High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera's tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn't strike you deep in your heart, it'll at least stick deep in your head.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 06:38am


From Miles Davis' Rock Hall Biography:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period.

The above is a totally false and inane comment. If he really believes that, he's ignorant about Miles' music of that period.

I think the writer was trying to imply that BS&T and Chicago didn't get in because being a major proponent of a music style that was "briefly popular" doesn't qualify them for the RRHOF and rationalized Miles Davis getting in by claiming that he didn't play this kind of music anyway.

It's a pretty ridiculous reach, IMO.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 06:46am


Roy.....Did you get it all out of your system? I think we all know your opinion of the Chicago snub.

Posted by blah-blah-blah on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 06:53am


Roy...you obviously know very little...if anything about the Dave Clark 5 (I'm guessing this because Chicago seems to be the only group you can talk about in depth)or that particular era in music. So with that in mind, please refrain from talking about them.

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 07:27am


Didn't Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass fuse jazz and pop/rock years before Chicago??

Posted by interviewer on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 10:15am


interviewer, to answer your question: No, Herb Alpert and TJB did not fuze jazz and pop/rock. Herb Alpert, had a new sound (at the time) and an incredibly successful career. But his sound had minimal if any elements of rock. It would be more correct to say he fuzed jazz with Latin, particularly Mexican. Beginning with Lonely Bull and many other TJB hits had distinct mariachi influence.

One of these days I will write a post on what IS rock. Because it seems many people really don't know, at least they don't seem to know how the RHOF defines rock. For now, understand this, the core sound in rock is almost always the guitar. The string is the thing! I will elaborate some other time.

As for Chicago, I'm a big fan just like Roy. Chicago did have two prominent guitarists. Terry Kath on lead guitar was probably the defining instrumentalist for the group, and Peter Cetera was a great bass guitarist. They would have been a great rock band without the brass. But the horns actually added another "voice" to their sound, made them even better. They belong in the RHOF, long overdue.

But now, Roy, stop beating up DC5. Are you mad at them cause they are inducted and Chicago is not?

Posted by Telarock on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 11:51am


BTW, I can only to speak for Chicago up to the time of Terry Kath's death in 1978. Past that time, it's a different group for me.

Posted by Telarock on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 12:02pm


Telarock said: 'BTW, I can only to speak for Chicago up to the time of Terry Kath's death in 1978. Past that time, it's a different group for me.'

That's why they should only induct 'the Terry Kath years'. No one who entered the band after his death should be inducted (if Chicago is ever inducted).

Personally, I think they will be inducted some day (maybe after Jann Wenner dies). Maybe after I'm dead & all the band members are dead.

Posted by Paul in KY on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 12:47pm


Street Player

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 14:51pm


I agree with you Paul in KY. I wouldnt support inducting any members of Chicago beyond the group as of 1978. There could be no end of it! So maybe that is part of the "problem"?

Posted by Telarock on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 16:14pm


This thing with Chicago is like beating a dead horse. I think for whatever reason, they're not gonna get inducted...no matter what line-up you offer! Members of the nominating committee seem to have it in for them, and let's not forget that Jann Wenner seems to have some sort of "veto" power...just ask the Dave Clark 5!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 18:04pm


Bands with more than 9 members inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Parliament-Funkadelic - 16
The Grateful Dead - 12

This is copied directly from the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame website:

Parliament-Funkadelic
Induction Year: 1997
Induction Category: Performer

Inductees: George Clinton (vocals; born July 22, 1940), Jerome “Bigfoot” Brailey (drums; born August 20, 1950), William “Bootsy” Collins (bass, vocals; born October 26, 1951), Raymond Davis (vocals; born March 29, 1940), Tiki Fulwood (drums, vocals; born May 23, 1944), Glenn Lamont Goins (vocals, guitar; born tk, died 1978), Michael Hampton (guitar; born November 15, 1956), Clarence “Fuzzy” Haskins (vocals; born June 8, 1941), Eddie Hazel (guitar, vocals; born April 10, 1950, died 1992), Walter “Junie” Morrison (keyboards, synthesizers; born tk), Cordell “Boogie” Mosson Jr. (bass; born October 16, 1952), William “Billy Bass” Nelson Jr. (bass; born January 28, 1951), Gary Shider (vocals, guitar; born July 24, 1953), Calvin “Thang” Simon (vocals; born May 22, 1942), Grady Thomas (vocals; born January 5, 1941), Bernie Worrell (keyboards, vocals, born April 19, 1944)

The Grateful Dead
Induction Year: 1994
Induction Category: Performer

Inductees: Tom Contanten (keyboards; born March 19, 1944), Jerry Garcia (guitar, vocals; born August 1, 1942, died August 9, 1995), Donna Godchaux (vocals; born August 22, 1945), Keith Godchaux (keyboards; born July 14, 1948, died July 21, 1980), Mickey Hart (drums, percussion; born September 11, 1943), Robert Hunter (lyricist; born June 23, 1941), Bill Kreutzmann (drums; born April 7, 1946), Phil Lesh (bass, vocals; born March 15, 1940), Ron “Pigpen” McKernan (keyboards, harmonica, vocals; born September 8, 1945, died March 8, 1973), Brent Mydland (keyboards, vocals; born October 21, 1952, died July 26, 1990), Bob Weir (guitar, vocals; born October 16, 1947), Vince Welnick (keyboards; born February 22, 1951, died June 2, 2006).

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 18:21pm


True, but those bands didn't piss Jann Wenner off. How do you propose to get by that, Roy. He obviously can't be pressured or told what to do, and he has displayed a certain "veto" power.

Everyone who knows anything about popular music over the last 40 years knows perfectly well what Chicago has accomplished, and you can waste your time typing up these lists you come up with and rant and rave about the injustice. But how do you propose getting by someone in charge who is seemingly made of teflon, doesn't care what the fans think, and seems to really have it in for Chicago...among others?

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 18:31pm


Everyone who knows anything about popular music over the last 40 years knows perfectly well what Chicago has accomplished, and you can waste your time typing up these lists you come up with and rant and rave about the injustice. But how do you propose getting by someone in charge who is seemingly made of teflon, doesn't care what the fans think, and seems to really have it in for Chicago...among others?

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 18:31pm
--------------------------------------------------
Tis' the reason why I'm not really here to talk HOF, but rather just rock in general which, if it has to, will wander down the path of the Hall.

Roy -

I may actually have an answer to your Chicago dilemma that may make some sense. I'm not going to try and advocate Wenner too much here, but in all the mentions of jazz & rock, nobody has mentioned the Doors. They have a far greater calling card than Herb Alpert or Miles Davis when it comes to the real fusion of jazz & rock. In addition, they do show up a full two yrs. before Chicago (at least in terms of the charts - 67 to 69). Could it be that Wenner honestly believes he HAS inducted the original jazz-rock act? I DO support Chicago, but you can make something of a case here in this regard.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 19:49pm


Also don't forget The Zombies. Rod Argent definitely combined jazz and rock on She's Not There in 1964-three years before the Doors came along. Also Traffic used jazz elements starting in 1967 as well as Zappa and Beefheart in the mid-late 60s.

So this notion that Chicago was the first to incorporate jazz into rock is simply not born out by the facts.

Posted by classicrocker on Tuesday, 11.25.08 @ 23:08pm


Roy, this is becoming an endless diatribe and hate orgy for Jann Wenner besides. I saw yor post about "bands with more than 9 members" - it doesnt move me. When I think of Chicago, it is the following:
Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Danny Seraphine
Robert Lamm
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Laudir DeOliveira
Beyond the above personnel, you have some 'enterprize' which was formerly the artists known as Chicago. Just a succession of people tailgating on the name Chicago. I'm not having it.

Posted by Telarock on Wednesday, 11.26.08 @ 08:58am


If Chicago had been inducted when they were supposed to be inducted back in 1995, I would have agreed that only the members from 1967-1979 should be inducted, but it's too late for that now! Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff have been with Chicago for over 25 years now! Combined, they have written 40 songs for Chicago and there is more to come and they are lead singers too along with Robert Lamm.

Members of Chicago to be Inducted:

Terry Kath (1967-1978)
Peter Cetera (1967-1985)
Danny Seraphine (1967-1991)
Robert Lamm (1967-Present)
James Pankow (1967-Present)
Lee Loughnane (1967-Present)
Walter Parazaider (1967-Present)
Laudir DeOliveira (1973-1980)
Bill Champlin (1981-present)
Jason Scheff (1985-present)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 11.26.08 @ 10:16am


http://theclassicmetalshow.com/interviews/CMSChicago112708.mp3

Recent radio interview with Robert Lamm

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 11.30.08 @ 06:27am


Chicago should have been inducted YEARS ago! What is wrong with you people?

Posted by Kathy on Saturday, 12.13.08 @ 11:22am


When I saw that Chicago was not inducted in the rock hall of fame, I couldnt believe it. How in the world is one of the most influential and popular bands not already in?? For a long time they were just as popular as the beach boys. It truly confirms the inaccuarcy of the rock hall of fame. Its more like a joke.

Posted by Mr. Journey on Monday, 12.15.08 @ 11:04am



As of 2008, Chicago is # 19 on the list of the all-time charting artists on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. This will continue to change as they release more albums. Chicago is # 13 all-time on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. This won't change anytime soon since the singles business is pretty much dead! Chicago will hold that # 13 position for many years to come.

All those other bands that Rolling Stone Magazine likes to lump Chicago in with, (as guilty pleasures) don't even come anywhere close to Chicago on the Billboard Charts:

Boston, Kansas, Journey, Styx, Foreigner, REO Speedwagon, Air Supply, Bon Jovi (NOWHERE CLOSE!!!!) Chicago was better than all of them!!

Chicago belongs with this group:

The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, The Who, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Genesis, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac

Chicago was the number one charting band of the 1970s. Elton John was number one overall.

01. Elton John
02. Elvis Presley
03. Neil Diamond
04. Barbra Streisand
05. Chicago

Chicago is the second all-time charting American Rock band behind The Beach Boys.

Chicago is 5th all-time among bands on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

03. The Beatles
05. The Rolling Stones
10. The Temptations
11. The Beach Boys
19. Chicago

Chicago is 4th all-time among bands on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
10. The Rolling Stones
12. The Bee-Gees
13. Chicago

Chicago has sold 130 MILLION ALBUMS WORLDWIDE!

Chicago belongs in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame!

Who did Chicago influence? Their contemporaries, that's who!! You know, past inductees into the Rock Hall get to vote on who gets inducted each year. They get ballots in their mail boxes. So, Chicago is pretty much a shoe-in for the Rock Hall if only they would make the final ballot. We've got 7 more years before the class of 1990 beomes eligible.

INDUCT CHICAGO NOW!
INDUCTION SPEECH: THE BEACH BOYS or EARTH, WIND, & FIRE - CHICAGO TOURMATES!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 06:01am


Happy New Year Roy...I was wondering when you would send out your first New Year posting on Chicago. Thanks for reiterating everything that you have told us a 10x before. Maybe 2009 is the year for your boys.

Posted by Blah-blah-blah on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 06:07am


Chicago Studio Albums With All Original Material:

01. 1969 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 Chicago II
03. 1971 Chicago III
05. 1972 Chicago V
06. 1973 Chicago VI
07. 1974 Chicago VII
08. 1975 Chicago VIII
09. 1976 Chicago X
10. 1977 Chicago XI
11. 1978 Hot Streets
12. 1979 Chicago 13
13. 1980 Chicago XIV
14. 1982 Chicago 16
15. 1984 Chicago 17
16. 1987 Chicago 18
17. 1988 Chicago 19
18. 1991 Twenty 1
19. 2006 Chicago XXX
20. 2008 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 06:20am


Roy,

"Chicago Transit Authority" does include one song song that was NOT original. "I'm A Man" was first recorded by the Spencer Davis Group with Steve Winwood on lead vocals.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 09:15am


Chicago Studio Albums With All Original Material:

01. 1969 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 Chicago II
03. 1971 Chicago III
04. 1972 Chicago V
05. 1973 Chicago VI
06. 1974 Chicago VII
07. 1975 Chicago VIII
08. 1976 Chicago X
09. 1977 Chicago XI
10. 1978 Hot Streets
11. 1979 Chicago 13
12. 1980 Chicago XIV
13. 1982 Chicago 16
14. 1984 Chicago 17
15. 1987 Chicago 18
16. 1988 Chicago 19
17. 1991 Twenty 1
18. 2006 Chicago XXX
19. 2008 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 09:25am


Yes, I know. It's only one song. I left out the Greatest Hits albums, the Christmas albums, the live albums and Night and Day.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 09:27am


Roy, we (all who frequent this site) know you love Chicago, but why did you post the albums list twice? One list has 20 and the other has 19? I tried but couldn't find Waldo. (missing #)

As to getting Chicago nominated: Its tricky! Why would their chances improve anytime in the future? If you actually know who makes up the nominating committee these days, you should expect a turn away from classic acts like Chicago and Tull and Neil Diamond. I unfortunately see a move to more pop and hip-hop. And I don't think modern-day Chicago cranking out albums w/ all those super-bowl type numerals is going to do squat for their chances. Sorry Roy, but thats the way it iz.

Posted by Telarock on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 10:51am


Has Chicago even made it as one of the nominees any given year? It[s one thing to be discussed (which is included in "previously considered," but another if the group actually hasn't even made it to the nominee ballot. And even still, Chicago has been eligible for 15 years- I said it before, the switch to te glossy sound of the 80s may have hurt the band's chances.

Posted by JR on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 11:22am


What's wrong with a group trying to change with the times. The 1980's was all about Synthesizers. You know that. At least for the first half of the '80's they were. Horn pop music was dying out.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 11:30am


If you noticed I accidentally put a 5 after the 3 instead of a four in the first list. Nothing's missing, just numbered incorrectly.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.6.09 @ 12:15pm


CTA - I'm A Man written by Steve Winwood
III - When All The Laughter Dies In Sorrow - Kendrew Lasalles

Posted by rhh on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 10:19am


I don't understand why people post chart stats here- that has nothing to do with the HOF. If the committee doesn't feel a band should get in, it won't make it onto the ballot.

Joe, there's nothing wrong with changing with the times. What I meant was that Chicago's music in the 80s wasn't highly favored by critics; it was the kind of sappy, syruppy material that is "frowned upon." And, Peter Cetera definitely continued that tradition when he went solo.

You can get an idea of how acclaimed an act is by visiting acclaimedmusic.net. None of Chicago's singles are in the current top 3,000, and just one album is (Chicago Transit Authority). Not the most beloved band, critically, unfortunately (I like the music myself, though).

Posted by JR on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 11:12am


A critical and commercial success.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 11:18am


JR....I just checked out that site (acclaimed music). I didn't really have time to go through the whole site. How did they arrive at their rankings? I have to say that I am very unimpressed with their listing. But then, I am rarley impressed with listings from magazines, websites or TV shows.

I have never really commented on Chicago so here is my buck 3.80. I like them. I thought their first 5 albums were pretty damn good and somewhat different than what was mostly out there at the time. I think they deserve a spot in the Hall; but I also think there are some bands that need to get in before they do.

Posted by Blah-blah-blah on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 12:38pm


Regarding that site, acclaimed music - Nevermind by Nirvana is ranked as the 3rd greatest album of all-time. With all due respect to Nirvana and the Grunge scene, there is no chance in hell that album should be rated higher than Who's Next, Rubber Soul, Tommy, Exile on Main Street, Let It Bleed, Pepper, London Calling, Rocket to Russia and countless other albums. This site has minimal viability as far as I am concerned after reading this list.

Posted by Blah-blah-blah on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 13:37pm


Don't dismiss the sitejust because you disagree with one ranking. That site is not about how high a record should be rated, but how high it actually ís rated. Don't blame Acclaimed Music for Nevermind's high rating, blame all the journalists and all the other listmakers that the site uses as a source.

Posted by The_Claw on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 15:10pm


Regarding that site, acclaimed music - Nevermind by Nirvana is ranked as the 3rd greatest album of all-time. With all due respect to Nirvana and the Grunge scene, there is no chance in hell that album should be rated higher than Who's Next, Rubber Soul, Tommy, Exile on Main Street, Let It Bleed, Pepper, London Calling, Rocket to Russia and countless other albums.

Posted by Blah-blah-blah on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 13:37pm
--------------------------------------------------
Why not? It's a classic album, isn't it?

Why can't a more modern album be ranked high? (and I use that term modern lightly, seeing as how Nevermind is 18 yrs old) Plenty of classic albums since the start of the 80's -

GNR - Appetite Def Lep - Pyromania
VH - 1984 M. Jackson - Thriller
Prince - Purple Rain Police - Synchronicity
Smiths - Meat is Murder J&MC - Psychocandy
Metallica - Master of Puppets
Pearl Jam - Ten S. Pumpkins - Mellon Collie...
Beck - Odelay MB Valentine - Loveless
Radiohead - O.K. Computer

Is it only because those albums are older? If that's the case, I vote for Ricky Nelson's greatest hits, not for any coherent reason, but simply cause it's... older.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 16:25pm


Each adn every 1 of the 3 previous commentors re acclaimedmusic.net have self-contradicted.
1) JR - doesn't like charts/stats but then proceeds to offer up yet another list of "acclaimed albums" from a Swedish website.
2) Blah-blah-blah - trashes the whole list because of an issue with Nevermind (1 album) but almost all other groups he prefers are in the top 25 of that list.
3) The Claw - says it's NOT about what should be, it's about what IS. Based upon what? And isn't the whole idea to determine what should be???

Just a little jab at ya dudes, in fun. But I did look at the list and read about how it is made. Every list is only as good as the judgement of the people surveyed. What this dude, Henrik Franzon, does is to actually compile lists of lists. He takes multiple lists from different sources and crunches all the data together. What that does is effectively unweight any biases.

In my opinion the top portion of the list of "3000 Albums" is actually not too bad.

Posted by Bubble on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 16:26pm


Cheesecrop you snuck in just before my post. If you want, that website does give different versions of lists. The "All Time" lists probably rightly give weight to albums which have stood the test of time.

Also, excuse me Blah-blah-blah, The Who didn't hit the list until #34, just above "Thriller" which is #35.

Posted by Bubble on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 16:39pm


Cheesecrop you snuck in just before my post. If you want, that website does give different versions of lists. The "All Time" lists probably rightly give weight to albums which have stood the test of time.

Also, excuse me Blah-blah-blah, The Who didn't hit the list until #34, just above "Thriller" which is #35.

Posted by Bubble on Wednesday, 01.7.09 @ 16:39pm
--------------------------------------------------
Will have to check that out when I get a minute.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Thursday, 01.8.09 @ 05:49am


I'm writing my own Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Speech for Chicago. I will post it soon.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.18.09 @ 04:08am


Chicago was the number one charting band of the 1970s. Elton John was number one overall.

01. Elton John
02. Elvis Presley
03. Neil Diamond
04. Barbra Streisand
05. Chicago

Chicago is 5th all-time among groups on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Temptations
04. The Beach Boys
05. Chicago

Chicago is 4th all-time among groups on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Supremes

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 01.21.09 @ 15:11pm


The Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart: The Top 2 Charting Artists of the 1970s:

01. Elton John
02. Chicago

The Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart: The Top 5 Charting Artists of the 1970s:

01. Elton John
02. Elvis Presley
03. Neil Diamond
04. Barbra Streisand
05. Chicago

The Top 5 All-Time Charting Bands on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Temptations
04. The Beach Boys
05. Chicago

The Top 4 All-Time Charting Bands on the Billboard Top 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago

Chicago is the only band on those lists that is not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.25.09 @ 18:30pm


Chicago: Who Wrote What?

Written by Robert Lamm

01. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
02. Beginnings
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. Listen
05. Poem 58
06. Southern California Purples
07. Someday (August 29, 1968)
08. Poem For The People
09. Wake Up Sunshine
10. Fancy Colours
11. 25 Or 6 To 4
12. It Better End Soon: 1st Movement
13. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
14. It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
15. It Better End Soon: 4th Movement
16. Sing A Mean Tune Kid
17. Loneliness Is Just A Word
18. I Don't Want Your Money
19. Travel Suite: Flight 602
20. Travel Suite: Free
21. Travel Suite: Free Country
22. Travel Suite: At The Sunrise
23. Travel Suite: Happy 'Cause I'm Going Home
24. Mother
25. A Hit By Varese
26. All Is Well
27. Dialogue (Part 1)
28. Dialogue (Part 2)
29. While The City Sleeps
30. Saturday In The Park
31. State of the Union
32. Goodbye
33. Critic's Choice
34. Darlin' Dear
35. Something In This City Changes People
36. Hollywood
37. Rediscovery
38. Italian From New York
39. Hanky Panky
40. Life Saver
41. Woman Don't Want To Love Me
42. Skinny Boy
43. Never Been In Love Before
44. Harry Truman
45. Long Time No See
46. Ain't It Blue?
47. Another Rainy Day In New York City
48. Scrapbook
49. Gently I'll Wake You
50. You Get It Up
51. Policeman
52. Vote For Me
53. Hot Streets
54. Love Was New
55. Paradise Alley
56. Reruns
57. A Song For Richard and His Friends
58. Bright Eyes
59. Paris
60. Manipulation
61. Upon Arrival
62. Thunder and Lightning
63. I'd Rather Be Rich
64. Doin' Business
65. Soldier of Fortune
66. Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
67. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
68. Where We Begin
69. Good For Nothing
70. Forever
71. Over and Over
72. I Stand Up
73. One From The Heart
74. Only Time Can Heal the Wounded
75. Love Is Forever
76. All the Years
77. Plaid
78. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
79. The Pull
80. Sleeping In the Middle of the Bed
81. Back To You
82. 90 Degrees and Freezing
83. Come To Me, Do

Written by James Pankow

01. Someday (August 29, 1968)
02. Liberation
03. Movin' In
04. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Make Me Smile
05. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: So Much To Say; So Much To Give
06. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Anxiety's Moment
07. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: West Virginia Fantasies
08. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Colour My World
09. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: To Be Free
10. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Now More Than Ever
11. Elegy: When All The Laughter Dies In Sorrow
12. Elegy: Canon
13. Elegy: Once Upon A Time...
14. Elegy: Progress?
15. Elegy: The Approaching Storm
16. Elegy: Man Vs. Man: The End
17. Now That You've Gone
18. Just You 'N' Me
19. What's This World Comin' To
20. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
21. Aire
22. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
23. Mongonucleosis
24. Brand New Love Affair
25. Old Days
26. You Are On My Mind
27. Skin Tight
28. 'Till The End of Time
29. Wish I Could Fly
30. Alive Again
31. Run Away
32. The American Dream
33. Live It Up
34. Bad Advice
35. Follow Me
36. What Can I Say
37. Only You
38. Once In A Lifetime
39. Free Flight
40. One More Day
41. God Save the Queen
42. Love Is Forever
43. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
44. Get On This
45. The Only One
46. Show Me A Sign

Written by Peter Cetera

01. Where Do We Go From Here?
02. What Else Can I Say?
03. Lowdown
04. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
05. In Terms Of Two
06. Happy Man
07. Wishing You Were Here
08. Anyway You Want
09. Hideaway
10. Mama Mama
11. If You Leave Me Now
12. Baby, What A Big Surprise
13. Little Miss Lovin’
14. Gone Long Gone
15. No Tell Lover
16. Mama Take
17. Loser With A Broken Heart
18. Upon Arrival
19. Song For You
20. Where Did The Lovin’ Go?
21. Hold On
22. Overnight Café
23. Thunder and Lightning
24. Bad Advice
25. Rescue You
26. Hard To Say I’m Sorry/Get Away
27. Love Me Tomorrow
28. Stay the Night
29. Along Comes a Woman
30. Prima Donna
31. Remember the Feeling
32. You're the Inspiration

Written by Terry Kath

01. Introduction
02. Free Form Guitar
03. The Road
04. In The Country
05. Prelude
06. A.M. Mourning
07. P.M. Mourning
08. Memories of Love
09. It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
10. I Don't Want Your Money
11. Travel Suite: Free Country
12. An Hour In The Shower: A Hard Risin' Morning Without Breakfast
13. An Hour In The Shower: Off To Work
14. An Hour In The Shower: Fallin' Out
15. An Hour In The Shower: Dreamin' Home
16. An Hour In The Shower: Morning Blues Again
17. Alma Mater
18. Jenny
19. Beyond All Our Sorrows
20. Song of the Evergreens
21. Byblos
22. 'Til We Meet Again
23. Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
24. Sixth Sense
25. Once Or Twice
26. Hope For Love
27. Your Love's An Attitude
28. Mississippi Delta City Blues
29. Takin' It On Uptown

Written by Danny Seraphine

01. Travel Suite: Motorboat To Mars
02. Lowdown
03. Prelude To Aire
04. Aire
05. Devil’s Sweet
06. Take Me Back To Chicago
07. Prelude (Little One)
08. Little One
09. The Greatest Love On Earth
10. Take A Chance
11. Ain’t It Time
12. No Tell Lover
13. Show Me The Way
14. Street Player
15. Aloha Mama
16. Birthday Boy
17. Thunder and Lightning
18. Sonny Think Twice

Written by Lee Loughnane

01. Call On Me
02. Together Again
03. This Time
04. Take A Chance
05. No Tell Lover
06. Wndow Dreamin'
07. Stone of Sisyphus
08. Child's Prayer

Written by Walter Parazaider

01. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
02. Travel Suite: Free Country
03. Aire
04. Devil’s Sweet
05. Window Dreamin’

Written by Bill Champlin

01. Sonny Think Twice
02. Daddy's Favorite Fool
03. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
04. Remember the Feeling
05. Please Hold On
06. It's Alright
07. I Believe
08. Come In From the Night
09. Runaround
10. Somebody, Somewhere
11. Who Do You Love
12. Holdin On
13. Hearts In Trouble
14. Plaid
15. Cry For the Lost
16. The Show Must Go On
17. Bethlehem
18. Why Can't We
19. Where Were You
20. Already Gone
21. Better

Written by Jason Scheff

01. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
02. We Can Last Forever
03. What Kind of Man Would I Be
04. Runaround
05. If It Were You
06. What Does It Take
07. God Save the Queen
08. Man to Woman
09. Bigger Than Elvis
10. Mah Jongg
11. Let's Take A Lifetime
12. The Pull
13. King of Might Have Been
14. Caroline
15. Why Can't We
16. Love Will Come Back
17. Long Lost Friend
18. 90 Degrees and Freezing
19. Where Were You

Written by Laudir De Oliveira

01. Life Is What It Is

Written by Donnie Dacus

01. Aint It Time
02. Must Have Been Crazy

Written by DaWayne Bailey

01. Stone of Sisyphus
02. Get On This

Written by Keith Howland

01. Back To You

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 02.21.09 @ 14:07pm


Excuse me if someone else has mentioned this, but posting up Chicago's chart success is kinda a moot point(irrelevant). They just don't have the credentials to get in... lack of musical influence/innovation, marginal critical acclaim... but I WAS shocked at the 7% chance of getting in. That's way too low for a band with their success.

Posted by ray on Monday, 03.2.09 @ 02:06am


Chicago's chart success is staggering, with nearly 50 hits to their credit, but their style is undoubtedly what turns off potential voters, as they abandoned their early blues-rock upbringing that had featured Terry Kath's guitar pyrotechnics for a more mellow adult contemporary jazzy ballad persona that made them superstars in the 70's and 80's but resulted in often poor critical response. Whether the Hall embraces the oft-maligned image that pop-rock has remains to be seen, even twenty years in to the proceedings. Worth examining, but will often fall short.

Posted by RAKER on Monday, 03.2.09 @ 02:30am


this band was really big in the 70 's - i mean really big -but seeing all the different guys parading around like they were part of that band is strange.

i bet if they put this band to sleep 20 years ago = they would have been in

Posted by golfer on Tuesday, 03.3.09 @ 11:09am


The historic debut album Chicago Transit Authority was recorded over a period of eleven days, from January 20 to 30, 1969, at CBS Studios in New York City. While the band was in the studio working on this seminal album, artists like Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, The Supremes and B.J. Thomas were topping the Billboard Charts and radio playlists with hits like For Once In My Life, Hooked on a Feeling, and Love Child. Young-Holt Unlimited scored with the instrumental Soulful Strut. All those records featured orchestration and horn sections, prominent in the mix and crucial to the overall sound and ultimate success of the songs. At the same time, rock music was starting to receive more attention in the charts with albums by Steppenwolf, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Cream, and Iron Butterfly riding high into the summer of Woodstock.

When Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. Smooth, lush harmonies, distorted feedback-drenched guitars, Beatles-meet-Motown bass work. Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums, churning Hammond organ, classical piano, and those powerful horns weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. This 'rock 'n' roll band with horns' came into the world kicking and screaming.

Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

But some looked at Chicago Transit Authority as jumping on the brass bus being driven by Blood, Sweat & Tears. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their numerous differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a band fronted first by organist and singer Al Kooper, then by singer David Clayton-Thomas. Chicago was fronted by three lead singers, all of whom played instruments and shared the spotlight. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all their own material.

Chicago was a younger looking and sounding band, rock shaggy and folk rough despite classical training, embraced by the college crowds, as well as fans of music as diverse as Cream and Richie Havens. Blood, Sweat & Tears looked like jazz musicians; Chicago looked like a rock band. Walter Parazaider's rock 'n' roll band with horns was formed February 15, 1967 and spent almost two years rehearsing, playing, writing, and preparing for the release of its first album; Blood, Sweat & Tears was formed in mid-summer 1967 but reached the recording stage sooner because of bandleader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record.

Despite these differences in image and regardless of who came first, one might still be tempted to place the two bands in the same musical genre. They both had horn sections and they both played jazz-rock. Right? Wrong! Blood, Sweat & Tears was indeed a jazz band. But something happens when jazz players play rock and roll--it sounds like jazz! Chicago was a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a rock band who could and did play jazz. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 03.3.09 @ 13:08pm


Street Player....

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 03.4.09 @ 15:28pm


The Top 4 All-Time Charting Rock And Roll Bands on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

The Top 4 All-Time Charting Rock And Roll Bands on the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

The Top 5 All-Time Charting Rock And Roll Bands on the Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

The Top 5 All-Time Charting Groups on the Billboard Top 40 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

Chicago is the only band on those lists that is not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 03.7.09 @ 02:28am


Isn't it strange how the band that defines the critera isn't in the RRHOF? What's wrong with you guys?

Posted by Chuckago on Saturday, 03.7.09 @ 10:58am


After finding this website and reading all the comments, I have 3 things to say. First of all the RRHOF needs a complete makeover and someone needs to go back and induct all those that are so deserving and already past their eligibility dates. 2nd, I thought a HOF was also for the FANS! 3rd, All you naysayers prove exactly the points that Chicago should have been inducted a long time ago. Whether you realize it or not, you all took the time to make a comment instead of just letting it go by and you unconciously compare Chicago to the Beatles. Chicago is not a STATIC band and no two songs sound alike. Chicago has the ability to adapt to the times and have played every type of music known to Rock and Roll.

Posted by mountainfan on Saturday, 03.7.09 @ 11:19am


I'm sorry but, Chicago does not define the criteria. They're great accomplishments are more in the category of making "catchy" melodies that became huge hits. They're music was inspired by other influences. It's very difficult to write great music. But writing good music is one thing. To innovate a whole new sound is another. I'm not an RR Hall of Fame apologist. They're are a ton of great, innovative artists that have been left out(The B-52s, The Stooges, Deep Purple). But Chicago is not one of them... and Chicago will NEVER be compared to the Beatles.

Posted by ray on Saturday, 03.7.09 @ 13:21pm


"2nd, I thought a HOF was also for the FANS!"--mountainfan

You thought wrong. The museum is possibly for fans. But not the intangible HOF itself. This is about peer recognition only. Like the Acadmey Awards.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 03.7.09 @ 16:27pm


To Ray

If you have not listened to every single Chicago song from 1969-1979, please don't comment. You're an idiot if you think The B-52s should in The Rock Hall and not Chicago.

Posted by FAZ on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 04:51am


Chicago was innovative!! So what if no one ever copied their sound or style of a piano, two guitars, drums and three horns. So what if no one in the music industry that came after Chicago sites them as an influence. That does not matter in Chicago's case. Chicago's style is what matters. Other Rock and R&B groups that that came before Chicago who used horns, like James Brown, The Doors and The Zombies didn't actually have members in their groups who played horns. They used outside musicians. Plus the horn parts on their songs were not long and intricate. The horns just honked a long here and there.

CHICAGO STARTED JAZZ-ROCK FUSION!! THEY BELONG IN THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME. THE MEMBERS OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE ARE EITHER TOO OLD, TOO YOUNG OR TOO UNINFORMED TO APPRECIATE CHICAGO AND THIS HAS GOT TO CHANGE.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 05:07am


Chicago was innovative!! So what if no one ever copied their sound or style of a piano, two guitars, drums and three horns. So what if no one in the music industry that came after Chicago sites them as an influence. That does not matter in Chicago's case. Chicago's style is what matters.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 05:07am
--------------------------------------------------
In some way aren't you shooting yourself in your own foot w/this kind of logic? You're repeatedly saying who cares if no one followed Chicago's lead, yet isn't that the point you're trying not to play up?

No Offense meant here; I like Chicago myself and have no issue w/them making the Hall. Just noting that anyone who feels they should not be in now has a stockpile of ammunition to work with here....

Posted by Cheesecrop on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 09:19am


"CHICAGO STARTED JAZZ-ROCK FUSION!!"- Roy

Actually, I think people like John Coltrane, Dave Brubeck, Wes Montgomery, and Miles Davis were experimenting with "Jazz/Rock Fusion" way before Chicago came along. Also, if we're purely talking about that kind of music, outside of the obvious bands that Chicago draws comparison to, during their heyday you also had Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Return to Forever, etc..., who were all very good fusion bands, and none of which list Chicago as an influence. They were contemporaries who leaned more to the jazz aspect, but were more likely influenced by people like Davis and Coltrane & Co. To say Chicago "invented" Jazz/Rock Fusion isn't a very accurate statement, nor is saying they were the best. Looking at just the line-up of those three I mentioned, you have a "who's who" of artists who were/are the best to ever play their instruments. Chicago did, in fact, have more commercial success than the others, which could boil down to "right place/right time".

Please understand Roy, I'm not dissing Chicago in any way. I do, however, think they should be put in proper context. I'm not the one to even venture a guess as to why they haven't been inducted. I think it boils down to a limited group of people who are passing these sorts of judgements and who are in control of the situation, and they simply don't-like-them!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 10:55am


Let me edit my statement...they were/are AMONG the best to ever play their respective instruments...sorry for the oversight.

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 11:30am


Chicago's sound has never been copied!

Posted by asif on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 12:17pm


There's a whole lot of great bands who you could say the same thing about...what's your point?

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 13:19pm


To Faz,

What makes you think I haven't listened to Chicago? And what makes you think that I don't like them? It's not their music or "songs" that's the issue. And check out the B-52s chances of getting in. It's 44% compared to 9% for Chicago. What does that tell you? There's nothing wrong with sticking up for a group that you love. But you gotta be a little more objective about it.

Posted by ray on Sunday, 03.8.09 @ 15:34pm


Their statistics are staggering. They are virtually the only band on earth to have new material hit the charts through FIVE CONSECUTIVE DECADES. They also pioneered a sound that combined elements of jazz and rock with three simultaneous lead vocalists who all had distinct voices on radio. Their influence over musicians is impossible to calculate, from Terry Kath's contributions to rock guitar, to Danny Seraphine's massive inspiration to drummers, to their horn section's revelation to every high school band kid in America that THEY too could be rock stars - even if they never picked up a guitar. Lastly, Peter Cetera has one of the THE most recognizable "hit" voices on radio.

NOBODY on the "why not?" list here on this website deserve to be in the Rock Hall more than Chicago. Like prog-rock innovators Yes, Chicago have been kept out for political reasons. They pissed off the bigshots at Warners when they recorded their 22nd album, Stone Of Sisyphus, an artistic statement that could very well keep them out of the Hall forever. Chicago represents an undeniable injustice that surrounds the Rock Hall selection process and destroys the institution's credibility. It's a very, VERY bad joke.

Posted by Vince on Sunday, 03.15.09 @ 22:03pm


nice to see the originals perform at hof - will miss kath - but would be a good show vs the dud shows lately.

heart and par benatar both still can put on a show -they deserve it AND can perform still.

give us break stop putting people knowbody heard of its boring

Posted by ms on Wednesday, 03.18.09 @ 20:47pm


Chicago may not be in the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame, but I saw them perform summer 1971 in an intimate atmosphere in New Hope PA outdoors in the round with at most an audience of 1500 or so people.

They were absolutely incredible. I was a total rock/head who loved the Pink Floyd, The Who, Deep Purple, Hendrix, etc. One would not put Chicago in that group of music but seeing them live they totally rocked out. Kath's guitar work was scorching, as good as Clapton, Trower, Blackmore, Frampton or any of the other guitar wizards of the day.

Tight, tight instrumentation, great compositions. They performed mostly CTA material from start to finish. I loved Kath's solo's in "I'm A Man" and "Questions 67 & 68". What a great show they put on. I thinked they were peaking then. Tons of feedback and distortion. Unexpected and tenacious.

Posted by Ed on Tuesday, 03.24.09 @ 19:36pm


DAVE MARSH OF CREEM AND ROLLINGSTONE ON CHICAGO:

My opinion is that they were interesting for about an album and a half and after that, not interesting at all. They aren’t in the Hall of Fame because they’ve never been on the ballot

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 04.9.09 @ 06:44am


Roy - if you read my comment on (About the eligibility class of 2010, Dameon wrote), I copy/pasted an e-mail which Dave Marsh sent me regarding certain bands that I am in favor of. I am fine with opinions of all; but he makes it very clear that there is in fact no objectivity in the voting process and that I & I in fact are not the sole basis of induction. Personal taste of the voting board rules!

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 04.9.09 @ 07:08am


I'd say they were interesting from 1969-1973.

After that most classic rock bands had to develop a much more commercial sound. The whole music industry changed. Most of these bands simply became too partied out. They lost the edge that made them great to begin with.

What about the Rolling Stones? Did they ever do a song as good as "Gimme Shelter" after their 1969 "Let It Bleed" release. "Sticky Fingers" had some great stuff but they made a lot of "uninteresting" music throughout most of the 70's, 80's to the present.

Did Pink Floyd ever come close to duplicating "Dark Side Of the Moon", a 1973 release? Not in my book.

Paul McCartney's best solo recording "Band On The Run", came out around 1973. After that McCartney was a poser. He didn't even try to write creative stuff throughout the seventies.

John Lennon made one great album, his first. George Harrison made a fantastic album "All Things Must Pass" in 1970. After that he pretty much disappeared in the music scene. There were even rumors that he retired. I believe John Lennon followed George into retirement.

It is all pretty similar as the times changed these classic bands no longer were relevant in their genres.

Yes I'll agree with Dave Marsh that many artists had their "interesting" periods but I feel the same about all of the other artists above I mentioned and guys like Dave Marsh would never doubt their rock hierarchy.

Posted by ed on Thursday, 04.9.09 @ 20:35pm


CHICAGO'S ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SCENARIO:

Song that plays while Chicago is walking up to the stage to take their trophies and give their speeches: Saturday In The Park

Chicago Performance: Beginnings, Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is, If You Leave Me Now, Baby What A Big Surprise

The All-Star Jam: Feeling Stronger Everyday, Dialogue 1 & 2, Free

Posted by KOOK on Thursday, 04.23.09 @ 09:38am


Chicago should have been inducted by now. They were an inspiration to me back in 1970 and are an inspiration to my children today.
Lets please show some respect to one of the greatest rock bands of all time "CHICAGO".

Posted by Ron on Monday, 05.25.09 @ 20:13pm


I think that CHICAGO should have been
in years ago!!!

I think PETER CETERA should be in the hall of fame also because for years he was the voice of CHICAGO!!

TulsasGinaG

Posted by GINA G on Thursday, 05.28.09 @ 19:45pm


The fact that there even needs to be a discussion is appalling. The RRHOF is just another museum until they start putting in all the people that deserve it. Let the fans vote.

Posted by Chuckago on Friday, 05.29.09 @ 10:53am


THE BLACK HAWKS SUCK

AND SO DOES JANN "MR. I'M TOO COOL FOR SCHOOL" WENNER

Posted by OKTOBERFEST on Tuesday, 06.9.09 @ 19:11pm


The Beatles
The Rolling Stones
The Beach Boys
Chicago


INDUCT CHICAGO NOW BITCH!!! THAT"S AN ORDER!!

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 15:46pm


http://www.songhall.org/vote/entry/495

Robert Lamm and James Pankow were nominated for the 2008 Songwriters Hall of Fame and the lost.

News

Robert Lamm / James Pankow

Keyboardist Robert Lamm and trombonist James Pankow are founding members of Chicago-and remain with the trailblazing rock band, which formed in Chicago in 1967, to this day. The songs that they wrote for the group are among its most enduring and include such signature hits as “Color My World,” “Make Me Smile” and “Saturday In The Park.” Their enormously influential work helped pave the way for jazz-oriented rock. Key songs in the Lamm/Pankow catalog include “25 Or 6 To 4,” “Color My World,” “Saturday In The Park,” “Make Me Smile,” “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?,” “Wake Up Sunshine” and “Old Days.”

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.28.09 @ 05:38am


http://www.songhall.org/index.php/vote/vote2008

Robert Lamm and James Pankow were nominated for the 2008 Songwriters Hall of Fame and they lost!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.29.09 @ 12:04pm


Jazz-Rock Fusion was the first group of jazz styles to attain widespread popularity after the Swing era. Music experts prefer though to label jazz-rock as jazz-funk, which began in the early 1960s. Jazz can be distinguished from rock and funk because rock and funk typically have shorter phrase lengths, less frequent chord changes, less complexity of melody, less complexity of harmony, less improvisation, more repetition of melodic phrases, more repetition of brief chord progressions, more repetitive drumming patterns, and more pronounced repetition of bass figures. Jazz musicians usually place less emphasis on electronic instruments, and high amplification on accoustic instruments. Jazz, rock, and funk music share similar roots in work songs, the blues, and gospel music, but they represent the products of two divergent lines of musical evolution. Jazz employs aspects of formal European concert music and steers away from vocals; it is primarily instrumental music. Rock and funk music on the other hand, emphasize vocals and stick largely to elementary compositional forms. Jazz-rock fusion mixed jazz improvisation with the instrumentation and rhythmic conception of Rhythm and Blues. The horn parts were molded after the James Brown and Motown brass styles rather than jazz. Their singing style was patterned after soul singing. The harmonies they wrote for their horns were more advanced than Motown's and James Brown's. The high-hat in jazz-rock drumming was snapped shut sharply on every beat instead of every other beat.

The greatest popular acclaim went to Blood, Sweat and Tears, an eight-piece band featuring vocals and horn work in a James Brown and Ray Charles style. Next was Chicago, a seven-piece band featuring solo voice singing as well as four and five-part harmony. Its horn parts were often voiced for trumpet, trombone, and saxophone, in the style of late-1960s Motown. These two groups were identified by journalists as "jazz-rock" bands. Journalists gave much attention to the horns and improvisation in Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears. Journalists assumed that such elements lent jazz character to the music, that it was innovative, and that it justified the "jazz" part of the "jazz-rock" label. Rhythm and Blues bands had been using horns and improvisation since the 1950s. Some elements presumed to be significant contributions by Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears reflected existing traditions within popular music. The only element these bands had in common with jazz was the occasional presence of a brief, improvised solo. Yet this was something that R&B had long been known for. Another line of reasoning was used in applying the jazz label to "jazz-rock" groups. This was the knowledge that some members had played jazz or had jazz aspirations. This colored the thinking of journalists who overlooked the traditions with R&B and Motown and instead assumed a connection with jazz. Journalists overlooked the long history of jazz musicians touring and recording with popular non-jazz groups. Jazz musicians had not made those groups into jazz groups anymore than the presence of jazz horn men in Blood, Sweat and Tears made that group into a jazz band. Blood, Sweat and Tears was a highly professional and creative group who performed several different styles of popular music; but they did not really demonstrate a fusion of jazz with rock.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.29.09 @ 14:45pm


Wow, Roy, you should be called Dr. Roy after that music history dissertation. (smile) Okay, I'll give you my Yes vote for Chicago already! I've been watching a lot of James Brown videos recently and the Godfather of Soul certainly did have impressive horn arrangements behind him.

Posted by Telarock on Wednesday, 07.29.09 @ 15:39pm


Chicago's roots were basically rock, but they could and did play jazz. The band consisted of seven members: Robert Lamm on vocals and piano, Terry Kath on vocals and guitar, Peter Cetera on vocals and bass, Danny Seraphine on drums, Lee Loughnane on trumpet, James Pankow on trombone, and Walter Parazaider on saxophone, clarinet, and flute. Their first producer was James William Guercio, the same person who produced Blood, Sweat and Tears. Chicago Transit Authority is considered one of the greatest albums ever produced. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. Terry Kath's voice was compared to the voices of Ray Charles and Jimi Hendrix, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than Jimi Hendrix's guitar playing. Chicago though, never became the darlings or rock or jazz critics. They were often vilified as "The Mantovanis of Rock" and "the purveyors of pap." Chicago was never able to match the jazz pedigree of Blood, Sweat and Tears.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.29.09 @ 16:38pm


Fusion became the first jazz style since the swing era to gain popular acceptance anywhere near the level accorded swing, and it lasted at least as long as the swing era. By incorporating elements of R&B and rock into their music, several established jazz figures achieved popular success that rivaled all the peaks of recognition accorded to jazz players since the end of the swing era's wide appreciation of jazz-oriented band music. This new success for jazz musicians did not depend so much on jazz character as on jazz-rock character. As with swing era big band recordings, those pieces presenting the least improvisation tended to enjoy the most popular acclaim. As with the hits of the swing era, jazz-rock hits were identifiable by simple, repeating riffs syncopated in a catchy way. Much of what went by the jazz-rock label consisted of little more than funky rhythm vamps, elementary chord progressions, and an improvised solo riding on top. This music was so popular that, in addition to the "jazz-rock" and "jazz-fusion" labels, it also acquired the label of "crossover" music because sales of the records crossed over from the jazz market into the popular market. There are several possible explanations for the new popularity of jazz and jazz-rock in particular. Perhaps when jazz adopted the electric instruments and the accompaniment rhythms associated with rock, and rock was so familiar already, the instruments and rhythms provided a bridge of similarity for listeners that eased them into a music that had otherwise been strange and difficult to listen to. A second possibility is that the increased prominence of drums was more inviting to dancers. Third is the relative simplicity of chord progressions found in jazz-rock fusion. The new music was more involved than rock had been, but it was harmonically less complex than other jazz styles. A fourth explanation involves the extensive use of repetition for a single accompaniment pattern. Technically, it is known as ostinato, which means that a particular rhythm or brief melodic figure is repeated continuously. It was fundamental to most of the jazz-rock hits of the 1970s, and its use might explain the enormous popularity of the boogie-woogie style of jazz piano playing during the 1940s. Many of the largest-selling recordings in any category of music are distinguished by their simplicity, rhythmic vitality, and extensive use of repetition. This combination of features could also account for much of jazz-rock's commercial success.

Basically, Jazz and Rock represent seperate streams in African American music that have occasionally overlapped. Jazz differs from rock in its similar amount of repetition, larger amount of improvisation, greater complexity, and higher musicianship. Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears, ought not to be called jazz-rock because they used little improvisation and had more roots in soul music than in rock and roll. They represent amalgamations of existing trends, such as the band styles of James Brown and Ray Charles, rather than a fresh style. The most original fusions of funk and jazz occurred in the band of Miles Davis, and the bands launched by his sidemen. The post-1968 music of Miles Davis displayed a blend of the jazz tradition, funk music, and the music of India and South America. The most prominent jazz-rock guitarists had tone color and rhythmic conception that departed from jazz guitar tradition and drew more from urban blues and rock practices. They were known for playing with phenomenal speed and precision.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 15:13pm


Hey Roy, care to cite your source there? Plagiarism is still a crime.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 17:19pm


Hey Roy, care to cite your source there? Plagiarism is still a crime.

Posted by Gitarzan on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 17:25pm


Git, that took me a minute to get, but ROFL!

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 17:40pm


Said it before and I still believe it- the slick shift in sound come the 80s hurt Chicago's chances. Granted, the band's pre-80s music as a whole hasn't received all that much in the way of acclaim, but I think the pre-80s work definitely stood out more than what came in the 80s and beyond.

Now, I enjoy "Hard Habit to Break" and "You're the Inspiration" fine enough, but that kind of materail is not HOF-worthy.

Posted by JR on Tuesday, 08.18.09 @ 21:13pm


Though they formed in Chicago, the band moved fairly swiftly out to L.A. to work with producer/manager James William Guercio and it was Hollywood rather than the Windy City that set the tone for their jazz-rock fusion. Their first outings had been relatively earthy under the name Chicago Transit Authority, but after their name had been shortened and their logo created, it was showbiz (and a string of hits) all the way, including 1976's smoochadelic 'If You Leave Me Now'. Much derided for naming their albums like Rocky movies - their line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven albums only by the death of guitarist Terry Kath. Fellow jazz rockers like Blood, Sweat & Tears and Electric Flag had long since foundered and cynical onlookers considered Chicago by far the smartest outfit for wising up to the limitations of the genre and opting for commercial success.

Posted by QAZ on Sunday, 08.30.09 @ 19:42pm


How in the world is CHICAGO not in the hall yet. What an crime!!! Rock On Guys, and I personally will never go to the rock hall until they are inducted!!!!

Posted by Pete Selvaggio on Wednesday, 09.9.09 @ 16:35pm


Put CHICAGO in the Hall!

It's the best band ever!
They really deserve that!

Long live CHICAGO!

Posted by Jen on Saturday, 09.12.09 @ 06:20am


WE ARE ALL HERE FOR ONE REASON, FIGHTING TO GET CHICAGO THE BAND, INTO THE HALL OF FAME. SO WHAT IS THE ACTUAL PROBLEM, WHY AREN'T THEY IN THE HALL OF FAME?

WHAT CRITERIA DOES THE HALL OF FAME BOARD GO BY TO BE INDUCTED IN? I DO THINK IT'S POOR TASTE, BAD JUDGEMENT TO TAKE SUCH TALENTED MEN THAT WRITTEN, PRODUCED SO MANY WONDERFUL SONGS OVER THE MANY OF YEARS, HOW DOES THIS GET PASSED BY. I HAVE ALWAYS SAID CHICAGO MUSIC IS ALL THE COLORS OF THE RAINBOW FROZEN IN TIME, AND IT REALLY IS.

BOARD MEMBERS GETS YOUR ACTS TOGETHER AND STOP THE NONSENCE, LESSER GROUPS WHO DON'T MAKE THE CUT HAVE GOTTEN IN. I AM SORRY BUT YOU ARE MAKING A BIG MISTAKE. RECONSIDER AND GET THEM IN THE HALL OF FAME WHERE THEY BELONG, HOME SWEET MUSIC HOME................^j^ TAMMY MICHAEL

Posted by TAMMY MICHAEL on Saturday, 09.12.09 @ 06:50am


Was it Jann Wenner, publisher of Rolling Stone and rainmaker for the RRHOF? He never "got" CHI.....

I'll repeat my argument against Wenner, who has asserted that the band became a ballad band and forfeited its place as an avant-garde rock band: then how do you allow the disco-king Bee Gee's in?!?!

I agree that the Bee-Gee's deserve to be in based upon their earlier work....and ditto CHI....


The Bee Gees have some things going for them - even when compared to Chicago. They started making hits even earlier. Nothing Chicago ever did came close to defining an era like Saturday Night Fever (love it or hate it) did. The Bee Gees have written many hits for other artists (Chicago has not), the Bee Gees have been highly successful producers and the Bee Gees songs have been covered thousands of times. And yes, they've sold a pile of records and had a very long career.

While Chicago deserves to be in, there is no question in my mind that the Bee Gees deserve their induction completely.

Posted by jammin@50 & DrackIsBack on Saturday, 09.12.09 @ 14:02pm


Chicago was the number one charting band of the 1970s.
Elton John was the number one charting artist of the 1970s overall.

The Top 2 Charting Artists On The Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart Of The 1970s:

01. Elton John
02. Chicago

The Top 5 Charting Artists On The Billboard 200 Albums Chart Of The 1970s:

01. Elton John
02. Elvis Presley
03. Neil Diamond
04. Barbra Streisand
05. Chicago

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 200 Albums Chart And The Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Grateful Dead

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 100 Singles Chart And The Billboard Top 40 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

Chicago is the only band on those lists who is not in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 20:15pm


To Roy,

Here's the criteria: Basically influence and innovation. Roy, maybe you should start making a case for an artists' induction by addressing what they have to offer in these categories. Not that I'm saying Chicago don't belong, but Roy you usually just state Billboard Chart history or make lists rather than the criteria at hand.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 20:30pm


I'm still working on my induction speech for Chicago. I will post it once I've finished writing it.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 21:00pm


Alright, then good luck with that.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 21:09pm


No Chicago? Hello??? Their influence on getting horns off of AM radio and onto FM cannot be missed.

Posted by QAZ on Tuesday, 09.29.09 @ 10:16am


The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Grateful Dead

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

Chicago is the only band on those lists who is not in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 10.2.09 @ 12:06pm


Street Player

Posted by Joe-Skee on Friday, 10.2.09 @ 13:27pm


2009 UPDATE!

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Bee-Gees

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

Chicago is the only band on those lists who is not in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 10.3.09 @ 05:19am


The first time I heard Hold On from Chicago XIV, I was amazed by the guitar and drum work in the following portions of the song. I also laughed hysterically at the way Peter Cetera sang in these portions:

From 1:38 to 2:30 and then again from 3:03 to 3:54

You know when the feeling gets you
It's gonna get you
And I know where it's gonna get you
Right there in the back of your mind

And I know when the feeling gets you
I won't forget you
Yes, you know that I won't forget you
Got too much on my mind

And I know when the feeling hits you
It's gonna hit you
Yes I know where it's gonna hit you
Right there in the back of your mind

And I know when the feeling hits you
I'll never quit you
Yes, you know that I'll never quit you
Got too much on the line
La la la la la la la

I love this song, especially the portions I posted above. You can bang your head to it. This song should have been played on Beavis and Butt-Head. I'm still trying to figure out the inspiration for this song. Sounds like something Iggy Pop or Devo could have handled pretty well, or maybe even Weird Al Yankovic...Dare to be stupid! Dare to be stupid! Chris Pinnick on guitar and Danny Seraphine on drums. This song would be great for a romantic comedy or a TV commercial.

Those two portions of the song Hold On that I mentioned above would also make a great way to annoy someone who is not a Chicago fan. I'm working on it right now on my computer.

I'm going to fuse those two portions of the song together and burn them back to back to back on an 80 minute CD and listen to it. I love it!

Hold On

From 1:38 to 2:30 and then again from 3:03 to 3:54

You know when the feeling gets you
It's gonna get you
And I know where it's gonna get you
Right there in the back of your mind

And I know when the feeling gets you
I won't forget you
Yes, you know that I won't forget you
Got too much on my mind

And I know when the feeling hits you
It's gonna hit you
Yes I know where it's gonna hit you
Right there in the back of your mind

And I know when the feeling hits you
I'll never quit you
Yes, you know that I'll never quit you
Got too much on the line
La la la la la la la

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 10.7.09 @ 20:58pm


"Those two portions of the song Hold On that I mentioned above would also make a great way to annoy someone who is not a Chicago fan." - Roy
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Roy, arent you an advocate for Chicago? And why did you keyput all the same lyrics twice (2x)??? Excess verbiage!

Posted by Telarock on Thursday, 10.8.09 @ 08:32am


The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 200 Albums Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Bee-Gees

The Top 5 Charting Rock And Roll Bands Of All-Time On The Billboard 100 Singles Chart:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Bee-Gees
04. Chicago
05. The Beach Boys

Chicago is the only band on those lists who is not in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Induct Chicago now!

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.14.09 @ 06:46am


Chicago songs that are over 10 minutes long:

The Chicago Suites Collection

01. 14:40 - Liberation
02. 12:04 - Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon
03. 12:32 - It Better End Soon
04. 21:16 - Travel Suite
05. 13:04 - Elegy
06. 10:09 - Devil's Sweet

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.14.09 @ 07:32am


This is exactly what makes this HOF a big joke.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1801712/posts

In this the complete corporate & political age
we are saturated with garbage & told that it is great.
It doesn't work on people who actually think.
However for this & future generations weened on the media machine it's words are the reality.

It is proven over & over & over that this band should have been on this list years ago.
On just the strength of their 70's work alone.

However with the bias, politicking & general bull,
we see that they are not.
I only pray more that when the quality acts are nominated in the future, they will tell this committee to stick it where the sun does not shine.

Posted by Kenny on Sunday, 11.15.09 @ 11:57am


Chicago: Who Wrote What?

Written by Robert Lamm

01. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
02. Beginnings
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. Listen
05. Poem 58
06. South California Purples
07. Someday (August 29, 1968)
08. Poem For The People
09. Wake Up Sunshine
10. Fancy Colours
11. 25 Or 6 To 4
12. It Better End Soon: 1st Movement
13. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
14. It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
15. It Better End Soon: 4th Movement
16. Sing A Mean Tune Kid
17. Loneliness Is Just A Word
18. I Don't Want Your Money
19. Travel Suite: Flight 602
20. Travel Suite: Free
21. Travel Suite: Free Country
22. Travel Suite: At The Sunrise
23. Travel Suite: Happy 'Cause I'm Going Home
24. Mother
25. A Hit By Varese
26. All Is Well
27. Dialogue (Part 1)
28. Dialogue (Part 2)
29. While The City Sleeps
30. Saturday In The Park
31. State of the Union
32. Goodbye
33. Critic's Choice
34. Darlin' Dear
35. Something In This City Changes People
36. Hollywood
37. Rediscovery
38. Italian From New York
39. Hanky Panky
40. Life Saver
41. Woman Don't Want To Love Me
42. Skinny Boy
43. Never Been In Love Before
44. Harry Truman
45. Long Time No See
46. Ain't It Blue?
47. Another Rainy Day In New York City
48. Scrapbook
49. Gently I'll Wake You
50. You Get It Up
51. Policeman
52. Vote For Me
53. Hot Streets
54. Love Was New
55. Paradise Alley
56. Reruns
57. A Song For Richard and His Friends
58. Bright Eyes
59. Paris
60. Manipulation
61. Upon Arrival
62. Thunder and Lightning
63. I'd Rather Be Rich
64. Doin' Business
65. Soldier of Fortune
66. Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
67. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
68. Where We Begin
69. Good For Nothing
70. Forever
71. Over and Over
72. I Stand Up
73. One From The Heart
74. Only Time Can Heal the Wounded
75. Love Is Forever
76. All the Years
77. Plaid
78. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
79. The Pull
80. Sleeping In the Middle of the Bed
81. Back To You
82. 90 Degrees and Freezing
83. Come To Me, Do

Written by James Pankow

01. Someday (August 29, 1968)
02. Liberation
03. Movin' In
04. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Make Me Smile
05. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: So Much To Say; So Much To Give
06. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Anxiety's Moment
07. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: West Virginia Fantasies
08. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Colour My World
09. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: To Be Free
10. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon: Now More Than Ever
11. Elegy: When All The Laughter Dies In Sorrow
12. Elegy: Canon
13. Elegy: Once Upon A Time...
14. Elegy: Progress?
15. Elegy: The Approaching Storm
16. Elegy: Man Vs. Man: The End
17. Now That You've Gone
18. Just You 'N' Me
19. What's This World Comin' To
20. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
21. Aire
22. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
23. Mongonucleosis
24. Brand New Love Affair
25. Old Days
26. You Are On My Mind
27. Skin Tight
28. 'Till The End of Time
29. Wish I Could Fly
30. Alive Again
31. Run Away
32. The American Dream
33. Live It Up
34. Bad Advice
35. Follow Me
36. What Can I Say
37. Only You
38. Once In A Lifetime
39. Free Flight
40. One More Day
41. God Save the Queen
42. Love Is Forever
43. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
44. Get On This
45. The Only One
46. Show Me A Sign

Written by Peter Cetera

01. Where Do We Go From Here?
02. What Else Can I Say?
03. Lowdown
04. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
05. In Terms Of Two
06. Happy Man
07. Wishing You Were Here
08. Anyway You Want
09. Hideaway
10. Mama Mama
11. If You Leave Me Now
12. Baby, What A Big Surprise
13. Little Miss Lovin’
14. Gone Long Gone
15. No Tell Lover
16. Mama Take
17. Loser With A Broken Heart
18. Upon Arrival
19. Song For You
20. Where Did The Lovin’ Go?
21. Hold On
22. Overnight Café
23. Thunder and Lightning
24. Bad Advice
25. Rescue You
26. Hard To Say I’m Sorry/Get Away
27. Love Me Tomorrow
28. Stay the Night
29. Along Comes a Woman
30. Prima Donna
31. Remember the Feeling
32. You're the Inspiration

Written by Terry Kath

01. Introduction
02. Free Form Guitar
03. The Road
04. In The Country
05. Prelude
06. A.M. Mourning
07. P.M. Mourning
08. Memories of Love
09. It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
10. I Don't Want Your Money
11. Travel Suite: Free Country
12. An Hour In The Shower: A Hard Risin' Morning Without Breakfast
13. An Hour In The Shower: Off To Work
14. An Hour In The Shower: Fallin' Out
15. An Hour In The Shower: Dreamin' Home
16. An Hour In The Shower: Morning Blues Again
17. Alma Mater
18. Jenny
19. Beyond All Our Sorrows
20. Song of the Evergreens
21. Byblos
22. 'Til We Meet Again
23. Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
24. Sixth Sense
25. Once Or Twice
26. Hope For Love
27. Your Love's An Attitude
28. Mississippi Delta City Blues
29. Takin' It On Uptown

Written by Danny Seraphine

01. Travel Suite: Motorboat To Mars
02. Lowdown
03. Prelude To Aire
04. Aire
05. Devil’s Sweet
06. Take Me Back To Chicago
07. Prelude (Little One)
08. Little One
09. The Greatest Love On Earth
10. Take A Chance
11. Ain’t It Time
12. No Tell Lover
13. Show Me The Way
14. Street Player
15. Aloha Mama
16. Birthday Boy
17. Thunder and Lightning
18. Sonny Think Twice

Written by Lee Loughnane

01. Call On Me
02. Together Again
03. This Time
04. Take A Chance
05. No Tell Lover
06. Wndow Dreamin'
07. Stone of Sisyphus
08. Child's Prayer

Written by Walter Parazaider

01. It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
02. Travel Suite: Free Country
03. Aire
04. Devil’s Sweet
05. Window Dreamin’

Written by Bill Champlin

01. Sonny Think Twice
02. Daddy's Favorite Fool
03. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
04. Remember the Feeling
05. Please Hold On
06. It's Alright
07. I Believe
08. Come In From the Night
09. Runaround
10. Somebody, Somewhere
11. Who Do You Love
12. Holdin On
13. Hearts In Trouble
14. Plaid
15. Cry For the Lost
16. The Show Must Go On
17. Bethlehem
18. Why Can't We
19. Where Were You
20. Already Gone
21. Better

Written by Jason Scheff

01. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
02. We Can Last Forever
03. What Kind of Man Would I Be
04. Runaround
05. If It Were You
06. What Does It Take
07. God Save the Queen
08. Man to Woman
09. Bigger Than Elvis
10. Mah Jongg
11. Let's Take A Lifetime
12. The Pull
13. King of Might Have Been
14. Caroline
15. Why Can't We
16. Love Will Come Back
17. Long Lost Friend
18. 90 Degrees and Freezing
19. Where Were You

Written by Laudir De Oliveira

01. Life Is What It Is

Written by Donnie Dacus

01. Aint It Time
02. Must Have Been Crazy
03. Closer To You

Written by DaWayne Bailey

01. Stone of Sisyphus
02. Get On This

Written by Keith Howland

01. Back To You

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.24.09 @ 07:01am


Chicago Studio Albums with Original Material:

01. 1969 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 Chicago II
03. 1971 Chicago III
04. 1972 Chicago V
05. 1973 Chicago VI
06. 1974 Chicago VII
07. 1975 Chicago VIII
08. 1976 Chicago X
09. 1977 Chicago XI
10. 1978 Hot Streets
11. 1979 Chicago 13
12. 1980 Chicago XIV
13. 1982 Chicago 16
14. 1984 Chicago 17
15. 1987 Chicago 18
16. 1988 Chicago 19
17. 1991 Twenty 1
18. 2006 Chicago XXX
19. 2008 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.24.09 @ 07:18am


THE TOP 4 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 11.29.09 @ 17:32pm


In terms of Influence....Chicago & Blood Sweat & Tears Horn dominated "Jazz Rock" sound was duly influenced, by their own admission by The Beatles "Got To Get You into My Life" (1966)....a song Chicago did live and B,S & T later covered...

...and even THAT Beatles song was in turn itself influenced by The Beatles Fellow Merseybeat Band The Fourmost...who in 1964 had done a cover of "Baby I Need your Loving" and in 1965 did "The in Crowd", & "Yakety Yak" with heavily featured Additional Brass ...from the Band Sounds Incorperated....over their Beat Group Sound.

The Fourmost also did Carl Perkins "Sure To Fall" with Country Fiddles over Beat Group sound anticipating The Byrds Country Rock sound by some three years !

The tracks "Sure to Fall", "The in Crowd" & "Yakety Yak" were all on The Fourmost 1965 Parlophone album "First and Fourmost" Produced by Beatles producer George martin.

Thus that "Jazz Rock" sound always credited to B,S & T... was in fact being made back in 1965 !

Both B,S & T and Chicago SHOULD be inducted into the Hall of Fame however for their influence on others and sheer Track Record of worldwide Sales etc....

If he does hold a silly Grudge against Chicago from way back... then Maybe Jann Werner ought to be REMOVED from his position.....?

Posted by Zeke on Monday, 12.14.09 @ 05:13am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO IS COMING SOON! IT'S LONG!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 12.15.09 @ 10:23am


It's a disgrace that Chicago has not been inducted. But, hey go figure, if Linda Ronstandt can't get in, do you think Wenner is going to let Chicago in? Jann Wenner you are beyond cruel and mean, grow up.....

Posted by dee on Saturday, 12.19.09 @ 17:34pm


Chicago is one of the most talented bands around.
They deserve the chance to be recognized for their accomplishments.

What do we have to do to get them there? They have been overlooked far to many times.

Pat

Posted by Pat on Sunday, 12.27.09 @ 15:34pm


http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=0204E4C4E3CC7938

CHICAGO: BEHIND THE MUSIC - NOW ON YOUTUBE

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.1.10 @ 21:09pm


80 million records sold - somebody must like this band

Posted by golfer11 on Saturday, 01.16.10 @ 16:55pm


130 million!

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.16.10 @ 17:01pm


The reason that Chicago is not in the rock Hall of Fame is because the Hall wants a reunion of the band with all original members. Pete Cetera refuses to do that. Since they pay the bands to perform Pete considers himself "another band" and demands half the money. That is the only reason that they are not in.

Posted by gary walker on Thursday, 01.21.10 @ 05:01am


gary walker, that's interesting if true. However, there can never be a reunion of 'all original members'. It's been that way since 1978.

The Hall has inducted ABBA & I can assure you there will be no reunion at their induction.

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 01.21.10 @ 06:42am


They were brash enough to say let's be the Beatles with horns.

The most famous logo in Rock and Roll.

A Rock and Roll band with a horn section.

A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music.

A rock group whose horn section formed the heart of the band.

The horn section was another lead voice dancing with the vocals.

A horn centered rock group.

A label said if you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you. It's like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.22.10 @ 00:24am


Bill Champlin has left Chicago (1981-2009)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.22.10 @ 01:11am


I would rather fail with an album that we really want to do than have a mega hit of crap. It's really a shocking thing to have been once considered avant-garde and now be dismissed as wimpy.

-Robert Lamm

Chicago's rock and roll soul was Terry Kath. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll.

At first CTA's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was.

It was calculted that we were going to stop being a band that played arrangements and become more song oriented.

-Danny Seraphine

They actually interspersed horns with rock and roll and that was not commonplace at that point.

Jimi Hendrix told me, "I'm pretty good man, but this cat [Terry Kath] blows me away."

-James William Guercio

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.23.10 @ 10:18am


Chicago had a new look but their sound still met with resistence. Their second album got little radio play and concerned CBS executives turned to Guercio.

Give me something to go to radio with. All these tracks are 10 to 12 minutes long. We edited a number of these records and I think Clive got really involved.

-James William Guercio

We absolutely worked all the edits to shape all the songs to fit into the song length at the time.

-Clive Davis

Guercio and Davis made Chicago's songs shorter and more radio friendly.

We were all pretty pissed off about it because oh how dare they cut up our music, you know, because we were artists.

-Danny Seraphine

Chicago was highly critical of the butchering of their material and I agreed with them actually, but it was a compromise to be on the radio.

-James William Guercio

For the 7 serious musicians in the band chart success came with a price.

It became this machine. It was calculated that we were going to stop being a band that played arrangements and become more song oriented.

-Danny Seraphine

I noticed and Terry Kath noticed that the music we were recording was not as experimental as previous albums had been. I was uncomfortable with it because I didn't want to just do that.

-Robert Lamm

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.24.10 @ 09:51am


Just so we are all clear! All of Chicago's songs and suites are available in their entirety on all their albums. I have them all. Those were never shortened or butchered. It's only the radio and singles versions of their songs that are shorter.

Posted by RAKER on Sunday, 01.24.10 @ 10:10am


CHICAGO INTERESTING FACTS

You're the Inspiration was not originally intended to be a Chicago song. Peter Cetera and David Foster were asked to write a song for a Kenny Rogers album. Kenny Rogers turned down You're the Inspiration and went with songs that were written by Lionel Ritchie instead. So Chicago ended up recording You're the Inspiration.

Peter Cetera did not want to leave Chicago. Peter Cetera wanted a Phil Collins/Genesis kind of relationship with Chicago, but the band and the record company wouldn't have that. Peter Cetera wanted to take time off from the band to make another solo album and then return to the band. Chicago wanted to tour more than they wanted to write new material and produce more albums. Chicago was in the middle of a tour when Peter Cetera quit.

Sting of The Police and Richard Page of Mr. Mister both turned down Chicago's offer to join the band as their new lead singer. Peter Cetera ended up being replaced by Jason Scheff from a little known 80s band called Keane, who never charted on Billboard. Other members on Keane included Tom Keane and Mike Himelstein. Jason Scheff is the son of Jerry Scheff, the bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff also plays bass guitar.

Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band The Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago in 1981. Bill Champlin wrote After the Love Has Gone for Earth, Wind & Fire and Turn Your Love Around for George Benson. Bill Champlin sang the theme song for the TV show In the Heat of the Night.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.24.10 @ 19:08pm


I've followed them since they started playing in the late 1960's. i have all there albums through "Stone of Sisyphus". They've been around longer then some of the other bands that are already in the hall now. They should have been elected in the first year they were eligible. Earth, Wind and Fire, a band with the same setup as Chicago(keyboards, brass, percussion & guitars), is already in, so WHY NOT CHICAGO. they paid their dues!!!!!

Posted by jimbo on Monday, 01.25.10 @ 12:30pm



I felt somebody tap me on the back and I turned around and it's Jimi Hendrix staring me in the face. He say I got to tell you your guitar player is way better than me, and he says the horns are like one set of lungs, and I'm sitting there like okay someone slip me acid.

-Walt Parazaider

There would be not photos of the 7 faces in the band on Chicago's album covers. The group would come to be identified by a logo.

Listen, in a lot of respects the group might resent me for it, but I wanted to market it in a certain way.

-James William Guercio

A label said if you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you. It's like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano.

-James Pankow

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 02.4.10 @ 14:07pm


I felt that this music had an impact on the youth of the world and could break down barriers.

-James William Guercio

Guercio had a global view and I can't say he was totally long, but the way he was going about it was just really destructive.

-Robert Lamm

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 02.4.10 @ 14:19pm


I felt that this music had an impact on the youth of the world and could break down barriers.

-James William Guercio

Guercio had a global view and I can't say he was totally wrong, but the way he was going about it was just really destructive.

-Robert Lamm

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 02.4.10 @ 14:21pm


FROM IMDB

WALTER PARAZAIDER

A founding member of the jazz-rock group Chicago, Walter Parazaider was born in the Windy City on March 14, 1945. Coming from a musical family, it was only natural that Walt would follow suit, and he began his career on the clarinet. Eventually, he became the protégé of the E-flat clarinetist in the Chicago symphony.

Parazaider switched over to sax ("It was a cool way to meet girls,") enrolled at De Paul University, and - inspired by the Beatles hit "Got To Get You Into My Life" - became enamored with the idea of creating a rock 'n roll band with horns. Early sessions at Parazaider's house included Terry Kath and Danny Seraphine, friends from Walt's teen years. Another friend was Jimmy Guercio.

The band, first known as The Big Thing, eventually became Chicago. Aside from being a founder, Parazaider's role consisted of playing woodwinds on trombonist Jimmy Pankow's charts. Never a prolific writer, Parazaider's compositional contributions have been slight ("Prelude to Aire," "Window Dreamin'"), so his rep rests largely with his playing, though there can be no doubt that he has suggested a horn line or two over the years.

Solid in the section, Parazaider is capable of playing both a gorgeous melody ("Colour My World") and eclectic, intricate improvisations ("Just You 'N Me"). But he has a penchant for the odd, and often enough his dissonant solos leave fans scratching their heads ("Movin' In" on "Chicago II," for example). To those who are musically literate, Parazaider's style borders on Coltrane-like experimentation (such as when he plays his solo on "Free" a step down live). To fans who just like a good tune, this can be confusing.

As such, most of Parazaider's best work is recorded. His solo on "Now That You've Gone" ("Chicago V") is perfect, and a nice display of his talent can be heard on "Long Time, No See" ("Chicago VIII"), which features a rare all-sax horn mix. Parazaider is all over the unreleased "Stone of Sisyphus" album, and it's a shame that his great playing on songs like "Plaid" can only be heard by fans who want to risk getting a bootleg of the set.

Tall, very thin, and long-haired when the group first started, Parazaider has trimmed his locks and put on weight in recent years. He's the only one of the Chicago regulars to have stayed married to his first wife (as of this writing), and he has at least one daughter (who gets a songwriting credit for "Get On This" on "Sisyphus" with Pankow and then-boyfriend/guitarist DaWayne Bailey). On the rare occasions he's interviewed, Parazaider comes across as pretty quiet and shy, though there is a sense of humor there. According to Pankow, Parazaider was one of the most bitter about the 1985 departure of bassist Peter Cetera, though Parazaider himself has never publicly said so. What he thought of the firing of old pal Seraphine in the early 90s is also unrecorded. By most reports, Parazaider is a nice fellow.

Now 60, Parazaider tours extensively with the band (occasionally spotted by Larry Klimas), and his extended flute solo is often a highlight of the performance. He is no doubt happy that his dream of a rock 'n roll band with horns has truly come to light.

JAMES PANKOW

The influential trombonist and composer for the jazz-rock group Chicago, James Pankow was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on August 20, 1947. He ended up playing trombone by accident (the other, "cooler" instruments had been distributed). Following the move to the city of Chicago, Pankow fell in love with the horn, even playing it during three years with braces.

One of nine siblings, Pankow's musical interests were encouraged at Notre Dame High School by Father George Wiskirchen. After graduating, Pankow won a full scholarship to Quincy College, but later enrolled at DePaul, where he was recruited into "The Big Thing" (later Chicago) by woodwind player Walter Parazaider.

Once in the band, Pankow's talents shined. A creative player with a sharp sound and a great range, Pankow was the best of the Chicago's horn players and possibly the best trombonist since Bill Watrous (though some feel David Bargeron from Blood Sweat & Tears played rings around Jimmy). The early Chicago records feature Pankow soloing on the small-bore King 2B, and many of his phrases and patterns are incredible (particularly on "Hanky Panky", "You Are On My Mind", "Mother", "A Hit By Varese" and "The Approaching Storm"). As Chicago drifted into power ballads in the 80s, Pankow switched to a signature model silver Getzen (now a collector's item), and has more recently been playing a Yamaha.

As great a trombonist as he is, Pankow's major contribution to Chicago may be as a writer. His brass arrangements are legendary, and his compositions include the huge hits "Make Me Smile", "Just You 'n Me", "Searching So Long", "Old Days", "Alive Again", "Bad Advice" and "Show Me A Sign".

Personally, Pankow seems to be one of the most available of the group. In interviews, he is hilarious, profane, and insightful by turns, and always seems to be in a good mood. He's also physically fit and can be described as short but muscular. He seems to have been interested in martial arts. Brown-haired and mustachioed (with the occasional beard) early on, he has now gone white, clean-shaven, and close-cropped, though he sometimes dyes his locks back to brown. His antics on stage are as legendary as his brass arrangements (he often dresses to display his biceps), and he's one of the few in Chicago who has a stage presence equal to the members of Earth Wind & Fire on this current concert tour. In the late 90s, there were reports that Pankow was anxious to try acting, and every now and then, rumors surface about a Pankow-penned book on Chicago.

Sources reveal Pankow has been married twice. The first, to Karen (for whom he wrote "Just You 'n Me") lasted 20 years, and broke up about 1993 (a Pankow tune called "Here With Me" on the infamous Stone Of Sisyphus project acts as a bookend). He has recently remarried, and become a father again - a prospect he obviously relishes. Pankow's brother John Pankow is an actor.

Almost 60 and still going strong, Pankow seems to love playing even to this day, and is sorely missed by fans on the rare occasions he can't make a concert.

LEE LOUGHNANE

Lee Loughnane (pronounced LOCK-nee), founding member and trumpet player with the rock group Chicago, was born into a musical family in Chicago, Illinois, on October 21, 1946. Influenced by his father (also a trumpet player), Lee excelled at the instrument almost from the beginning, even landing a spot in the All Star Catholic High School band. He continued his education at De Paul University.

Through his friendship with guitarist Terry Kath ("We were thick as thieves"), Loughnane met drummer Danny Seraphine and woodwind player Walt Parazaider. Parazaider, trying to form a rock 'n roll band with horns, encouraged Loughnane to sit in on rehearsals. At first, the group was known as The Big Thing. Eventually, it became The Chicago Transit Authority.

Lee's role (to begin with) consisted of playing trombonist Jimmy Pankow's brass arrangements and singing background vocals. His husky voice was an asset backing the lead singers on such songs as "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" In time, he also managed to sing some lead--and well (e.g., "Song of the Evergreens"). His voice would have to qualify as an underutilized Chicago asset (live these days, he often sings "Wishing You Were Here" and "Happy Man," and does a great job).

As a trumpet player, he's evolved from a good one early in his career to a great one today. Initially a Getzen man, Loughnane's solos on early Chicago albums show him exhibiting a quirky, offbeat style, accented by some fancy lip slurs and an occasional foray into upper registers (some notable early work can be heard on "Beginnings," "The Approaching Storm," "Movin' In," "State of the Union," and the out-take "Sixth Sense"). Given his prowess, it must have irked Loughnane that Chicago sometimes used guest trumpet players on their albums and sessions (notably, Maynard Fergusen on "Chicago 13" and former Tower of Power players on "Chicago 17"). In mid-career, Loughnane quit smoking, took on a new teacher, and traded in his Getzen for a Claude Gordon with a big bore ("like blowing down the Holland tunnel"). With a new set of breathing exercises and a new way of tonguing, Loughnane has become a monster.

He's developed as a writer, too. Famous is the story of how Peter Cetera had to rescue Lee's composition "Call On Me" for "Chicago VII." Later Loughnane compositions include "Together Again," "This Time," and the hit "No Tell Lover." By "Hot Streets" (1978), Loughnane was entering Pankow territory by doing some brass arrangements. His skill in this regard has grown, and "Chicago: What's It Gonna Be, Santa?" (the Christmas album) features his matured skills on such great tunes as "Let It Snow," "Sleigh Ride," and "Child's Prayer" (live, Loughnane often solos on these selections, and blows the crowd away).

One of the more approachable members of the band, Loughnane has been married four times and has several children. Tall, thin, and occasionally bearded early on, Loughnane has grayed and put on some pounds recently, looking a great deal like Maynard Fergusen. He suffered a minor heart attack in the 1990s, and says he's been taking better care of himself since. In interviews, he's articulate and can be funny. By all accounts, he's a nice guy. Certainly, Kath, Robert Lamm, and Pankow received more attention in the early years--and Cetera later--but Loughnane's evolution has recently been more of a public discussion among Chicago's fans, and this certainly must please him.

DANNY SERAPHINE

Drummer/producer Daniel Seraphine was born in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28, 1948, and was raised in Little Italy. He has said that his interest in music probably saved him from becoming a street tough.

By the late 60s, Seraphine was drumming in various bands, including one with teen friends Walter Parazaider (woodwinds) and Terry Kath (guitar). Named at first The Big Thing, the band eventually became Chicago, and Seraphine should be considered a founding member.

Once producer James Guercio got Chicago out to Los Angeles, things began to take off for Seraphine and the others. They managed to record their first album - a double one - in just two weeks. Famous for keyboardist Robert Lamm's songs, Kath's incredible guitar, and trombonist Jimmy Pankow's brass arrangements, "The Chicago Transit Authority" also features the rock-solid Peter Cetera (bass)/Seraphine rhythm section. Seraphine in particular shines on songs such as "Introduction" and "I'm A Man."

Creative and lightening fast, Seraphine could handle all aspects of the skins. Early Chicago efforts feature him bashing through classic rockers ("25 or 6 to 4"), doing his best Buddy Rich on jazz charts ("Devil's Suite"), and sizzling his Slingerland set with solos ("Now More Than Ever," "Motorboat to Mars"). His funky backbeats were a highlight when the band went soulful (e.g., "Skin Tight").

Not much of a writer at first, Seraphine later ended up penning some hits ("Little One," "Take Me Back to Chicago"), some filler ("Show Me the Way," "Birthday Boy"), and the interesting "Street Player" and "Aloha Mama." His writing partner was often the keyboard guy for Chaka Khan and Rufus, David "Hawk" Wolinski.

After periods where at first Lamm and then Pankow were defacto leaders of the group, the mantle fell to Seraphine (about the time of "Chicago XI" - 1977). According to Seraphine, this was because the others in the group were messed up on drugs. Kath's accidental suicide (possibly drug-related) in 1978 should have served as a wake-up call, but, in fact, several band members attest that the situation only got worse. Seraphine, ostensibly the only sober guy, ended up investigating management.

What he found wasn't good. Apparently, the band was being big-time ripped off. The fall-out included an acrimonious split from Guercio and a series of lawsuits. But Seraphine's troubles were far from over.

In 1974, former Sergio Mendes session man Laudir De Oliveira was added to the band as a percussionist (he'd done sessions with Chicago dating back to "VI"). In recent interviews, Pankow has said that De Oliveira was brought on board at Kath's insistence to keep the rhythm section on track. According to Pankow, Kath and others simply thought Danny wasn't cutting it. For his part, Danny has dismissed this as nonsense, saying HE got De Oliveira in the group to help expand their Latin feel. By the time Chicago rose from the ashes of the has-been bin in '82 with the release of "16" (with much credit due to Seraphine, who brought Bill Champlin on board), pop music had fallen in love with the drum machine. Seraphine came to grips with the technology, and "17" and "18" featured no live drums. The details are murky, but the official story is that Seraphine lost his chops (Danny denies this, saying, "I'll always have chops"). By "Twenty-One" (1991), session drummer Tris Imboden (who, it must be said, is excellent) had taken over, and, shortly thereafter, Seraphine was fired.

In 2008 interviews, Danny has been more candid about his departure. Initially reluctant to go into details, he has now stated that Champlin and singer Jason Scheff weren't keen on a drummer running the band, and issued Chicago an ultimatum: either HE goes, or WE go. In one or two instances, he's also mentioned that the originals had made a pact to stick together - a pact he indicates was heartlessly broken at the time (though he still calls his former partners "good guys"). Bandmates such as Pankow assert that Danny didn't spend enough time practicing, and that live shows were disastrous because of it; when an intervention didn't work, Seraphine was fired. Seraphine has scoffed at this as being a cover story for their true motives.

Since then, Seraphine has kept himself busy with a variety of musical and theatrical projects. Bearded and balding during Chicago's heyday (sporting the occasional toupee), Seraphine is now a goateed producer living in L.A. (after many years in Colorado). He has been divorced at least once, and has several children (some of whom he'd dedicated the song "Little One"). He worked with ex-CBS/Epic Records exec Ron Alexenberg, and co-produced and performed on Lyric's "Chocolate Soup" as well as their hit single, "Would I Lie". In more recent years, Seraphine has turned his attention to producing and resourcing investment for Broadway shows (he and Scott Prisand have been instrumental in bringing the Andrew Lloyd Webber hit musical "Bombay Dreams" to Broadway, following its London run).

In 2007, Seraphine began performing again with his new group California Transit Authority. They released a CD entitled "Full Circle," which is a mix of fusion and lively Chicago remakes. The band performs live from time to time and is developing a following.

PETER CETERA

Noted vocalist and bassist Peter Paul Cetera was born in Chicago, Illinois, on September 13, 1944. His initial foray into music was the accordion, but he soon made his way to electric bass (and, occasionally, guitar). Cetera's family was Polish in origin, and Peter grew up Catholic.

As a youngster, Cetera made the rounds in local bands before landing a gig with The Exceptions. In December of 1967, The Big Thing (later Chicago) and the Exceptions were playing the same place when Cetera approached the former, saying he liked what they were doing. Two weeks later, he'd switched bands.

Cetera's addition benefited Chicago in many ways. First, his tenor voice complimented the baritones of guitarist Terry Kath and keyboardist Robert Lamm. Second - and most important at the time - his bass playing simply rocked. Together with Kath and drummer 'Danny Seraphine', Cetera made the rhythm section cook. Although not especially noted as a bass player now, at the time, Cetera set the standard. Early Chicago recordings - such as "Listen" and "Poem 58" - benefit immensely from Cetera's creative lines.

But it's as a singer that Cetera is especially noted, and there's no doubt that the man can sing. "Questions 67 and 68," "25 or 6 to 4," "Just You and Me," and "Call On Me" all testify to his ability to sing the spots off a tune. His unique vocal phrasing was the result of reconstructive surgery following a fight he got into at a baseball game in 1970. Eventually, Cetera became known as the voice of Chicago.

Cetera was the last of the original Chicago members to join, and it's tempting to say that he always felt a bit like an outsider (says trombonist James Pankow, "Peter hated the horns"). According to Cetera, his early attempts at songwriting weren't well received by others in the band (it must be said these efforts are hit and miss), and by "Chicago VII" (which was supposed to be all jazz), his frustration was showing. When producer James William Guercio agreed that the "VII" sessions weren't going well, Cetera offered his compositions "Happy Man" and "Wishing You Were Here" - both winners, and both huge hits. Saying he was always the frustrated rocker in the group, Cetera hit home with the almost metal "Hideaway" on "Chicago VIII," a truly inspired bit of writing - tellingly, without horns.

Cetera, Guercio, and Kath recorded "If You Leave Me Now" after the others had finished their work on the "Chicago X" sessions, and when it hit, it went straight to #1 - the first Chicago single to do so. He scored again on "Chicago XI" with "Baby, What A Big Surprise," even though it was obvious that his contributions on that session were limited (he wrote and sang only that one tune). It was at this time that the group split with Guercio, and that - according to Cetera - both he and Kath were sick of what Chicago was doing. "Everything that can go on with a band was going on with us," Cetera has said. When Kath accidentally shot himself early in 1978, Cetera thought the band would end naturally. Doc Severinson talked them out of it. Cetera's bloated and disheveled appearance at this time may be indicative of his feelings about soldiering on.

But Cetera soon became the focal point. He was all over the increasingly low selling albums, sometimes penning and singing out-and-out winners ("Little Miss Lovin'," "Loser With A Broken Heart"), sometimes penning and singing sappy drivel ("Song for You"). When Columbia Records dropped Chicago, Cetera jumped on the opportunity to do solo work. His 1981 album "Peter Cetera" featured his great rocker, "Livin' In the Limelight."

Cetera became the Man in 1982. The "Chicago 16" sessions added keyboardist-guitarist-vocalist Bill Champlin and producer David Foster, but Cetera made the most of the opportunity, penning a funked-up rocker ("Bad Advice"), and the monster hit "Hard to Say I'm Sorry." 1984's "Chicago 17" cemented Cetera's position as he racked up the hits "You're the Inspiration," "Stay the Night," "Hard Habit to Break," and "Along Comes a Women." The fine work others contributed was usurped by Cetera's popularity, and the break up was inevitable.

According to Champlin, Cetera had been thinking about leaving for years: "He was ready." He'd quit smoking and drugs, lost weight, and began paying attention to his looks. Cetera says that he wanted to do a Phil Collins/Genesis-type deal, and the others wouldn't have it; others, like James Pankow, say Cetera wanted 50% of the cut, and top-billing ("Peter Cetera and Chicago"), and they wouldn't have it. Ultimately, according to keyboardist Robert Lamm, Cetera quit, saying, "I never really dug the music that much anyway." It was July of 1985.

As if in answer, Cetera immediately scored a #1 hit with "Glory of Love" - which had horns! He followed up with chart busters like "After All", (with Cher) "One Good Woman", "Feels Like Heaven" (with Chaka Khan), and has recently re-recorded some of his Chicago hits and a Christmas album.

Described as quiet and private, the blond Cetera has been married at least twice. His hair cut in a page-boy early in his career (with the occasional beard), he has stayed slim and GQ recently. Now out of Chicago longer than he was in, he dislikes discussing his years in the group, saying, "It's like talking about your ex-wife." He has turned down chances to re-unite with Chicago over the years, and famously refused to allow VH1 to use any of his songs in the "Behind the Music" episode about Chicago. He has pretty much quit playing bass, and has only started touring again recently after a long, self-imposed exile. He is, however, accessible on his website, where he answers questions and chats with fans with a great deal of humor and candor.

TERRY KATH

One of the most influential yet underrated guitarists of all time, Terry Alan Kath was born on January 31, 1946 in Chicago, Ill. Musical practically from birth, Kath taught himself bass, drums, and guitar, and made the rounds in local bands, impressing everyone he met. Childhood friends included Walter Parazaider, Danny Seraphine and Jim Guercio. In early 1967, Parazaider, Kath, and Seraphine formed the nucleus of what would eventually become Chicago.

A true innovator, Kath experimented endlessly with amps, guitars and equipment. While he possessed a rudimentary awareness of musical composition, he mostly just played by ear. Other band members where in awe of his ability to hear something once and play it back. Legend has it that Jimi Hendrix, with whom Chicago toured in the early days, idolized Kath, telling Parazaider, "Your guitar player is better than me". Listening to Kath's early recorded soloing on such tunes as "South California Purples", "Poem '58", "Listen" and "25 or 6 to 4", you'd be hard pressed to say Hendrix was wrong. Chicago's producer Guercio has said that Kath could have been a monster as a solo artist.

That Kath never received the recognition due him as a guitar hero is old news now, but it irked him during his lifetime. Band-mate Jimmy Pankow recalls a tour in England where Kath publicly gave the crowd the finger for comparing him unfavorably to noted greats like Clapton and Page. Listening today, aficionados are amazed at Kath's picking, and, while a bit dependent upon the wah-peddle, his creativity is still dazzling. He was capable of handling all genres, including jazz, country, metal, blues, and flat-out rock. He played a variety of guitars in his career, at one point owning nearly 20 of them. Early Chicago albums feature him on a Gibson SG and a Fender Stratocaster. Around 1972, he began playing a specially decorated Fender Telecaster as his main rig.

As a composer, Kath was much more hit than miss. Though Chicago never scored on the charts with a Kath single, the tunes he wrote were generally killer. Some, like "O Thank You, Great Spirit" and "Take It on Uptown" rival anything Hendrix, Clapton, or Page ever came up with. And Kath sang rings around them all. Blessed with a soulful, husky voice, Kath belted and whooped his way through such classics as "Make Me Smile" while possessing the ability to go smooth when the need arose ("Wishing You Were Here," "Colour My World," "Brand New Love Affair, Part 1").

In his personal life, Kath reportedly sensed that he wouldn't live long (he died a few days before reaching 32). He has been famously described as down-to-earth and a great guy, but a risk-taker. It's interesting to note that all Chicago band-mates, from Pankow to Robert Lamm to Peter Cetera, describe themselves as having been very close to Terry (Lamm has called him his best friend). This indicates that Kath could make himself comfortable with a variety of personalities. Kath was into fast cars, motorcycles, and guns. He was also into a variety of drugs, though reports indicate he wasn't addicted. He loved to eat, and fought a constant battle with his waistline (until he seemingly gave up near the end of his life, growing truly fat). He experimented with a wide variety of hairstyles and facial hair throughout his career, and had a fondness for wearing football jerseys. He was 28 when he married 19-year old Camelia Ortiz in 1974; they had a daughter, Michelle, in 1976.

Kath's death on January 23, 1978 is a watershed in rock history, but some confusion remains about what actually happened to him. Contemporaneous newspaper reports indicate that he accidentally shot himself with a 9mm automatic at roadie Don Johnson's house after a party in front of Camelia. Later interviews with band members such as Pankow indicate that Kath was alone with Johnson at the kitchen table and no party had taken place. Supposedly, Kath was displaying the gun when Johnson told him to be careful. Kath then is supposed to have put the gun to his head, saying either, "Don't worry, it's not loaded, see?" or, "What do you think I'm gonna do, shoot myself?" before pulling the trigger. Whatever actually happened, Kath's death doesn't seem to have been a suicide, in spite of Pankow's acknowledgment that Kath had been 'bumming' over a fight with Camelia (or Cetera's assertion that Kath was unhappy in Chicago and would have been the first to leave had he lived).

In any case, Kath is sorely missed. Chicago has carried on, and adding Bill Champlin in 1981 certainly improved things, but the contributions Terry Kath made to the group and to rock music in general can't be denied.

ROBERT LAMM

Legendary vocalist and keyboardist Robert Lamm was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 13, 1944. His early musical experiences included the Grace Church, Brookyln Heights choir. After his parents divorced, he moved to Chicago at age 15 following his mother's remarriage. Lamm played in bands throughout high school, and studied music theory and composition at Roosevelt University. He was invited to join what would become Chicago in early 1967.

His songwriting talents made him the default leader of the group in the early years. Lamm-penned hits include, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. International press portrayed Lamm as the group's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue","Free", "All the Years", "State of the Union", etc.) espouse political themes. In the 80s, Chicago's bassist/vocalist Peter Cetera became the commercial focus, and Lamm seemingly drifted into a period of both personal and professional frustration. He emerged in 1982 with a new attitude and starting with "Life is Good in My Neighborhood", he seemingly deals with his need to create by putting out both solo projects (e.g., "In My Head", "Subtlety & Passion" "The Bossa Project") and collaborations with others (e.g., The Beach Boys' Carl Wilson and America's Gerry Beckley). Good-natured interviews find him still committed to Chicago, but was somewhat dismayed by compromises the band made has made. And, of course, Chicago still tours constantly, most recently in an excellent series of concerts with Earth Wind & Fire, Huey Lewis and America. Famously private, Lamm's personal life is mostly off-limits to fans. He was married briefly to late actress, Karen Sullivan in the early 70s (her credits, as Karen Lamm, include Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974)). (She later married The Beach Boys' Dennis Wilson - twice). Lamm was also married to Julie Nini, whom he wed in Aspen, Colorado in 1976. They had a daughter, Sacha, in 1977, but the marriage ended in the early 80's. He remarried in 1985 to actress Alex Donnelley, and they had two daughters, Kate and Sean. The marriage did not last. Lamm moved to New York City where he met and married art director Joy Kopko in 1991. Apparently, Lamm has finally found the love of his life and, with Joy, he thrives on spending time with his extended family, all three daughters remain very close with each other and Joy. Tall, slim and dark-haired in the early years, the blue-eyed Lamm now seems fit and content.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 02.15.10 @ 09:40am


Hey Roy...

Just direct us to the IMDB page and we'll read it there. No need for a novel.

Posted by Chris on Monday, 02.15.10 @ 13:22pm


Geneis is sorta a similar case- where the latter era was not as well-regarded as the early era (the Phil Collins years vs. the Peter Gabriel years).

However, early Genesis was progressive and such, whereas Chicago was more of a pleasant, lighter group. And then those 80s years and beyond probably hurt the group's chances for induction.

Eligible since 1994 and not a single nomination? Would be surprising if the group was considered any time soon. We have seen acts be eligible for some time and then score a nomination, but that's not the norm.

Posted by JR on Monday, 02.15.10 @ 14:45pm


FROM IMDB

BILL CHAMPLIN

The popular soulful singer and keyboardist Bill Champlin was born on June 21, 1947 in Marin County, California. As a child, he demonstrated a talent for piano, and eventually picked up the guitar after being inspired by Elvis. By 18, he was married with a child (which made him ineligible for the Draft). He studied music in college, but was encouraged by a professor to drop out of school and pursue music professionally with his band, The Opposite Six.

The Six changed their name to the Masterbeats, and, later, to the Sons of Champlin. It wasn't long before they became very popular in the Bay Area. They had recorded a number of well-reviewed, low-selling albums (including "Loosen Up Naturally" and "Circle Filled With Love") by 1977 when the 30-year old Champlin went solo.

Teaming up with the then-unknown producer David Foster, Champlin (and a host of session musicians) put out two killer albums: "Single" and "Runaway." Had the record companies involved really pushed the material, Champlin could have been a monster solo artist in the Michael Bolton mode - only better. Unfortunately, terrific tunes like "Tonight, Tonight" and "Satisfaction" were released and allowed to disappear.

Still, Champlin prospered. His fantastic, bluesy voice made him an in-demand session singer, and he famously co-wrote the huge hits "After the Love Is Gone" (Earth Wind & Fire) and "Turn Your Love Around" (George Benson), picking up a Grammy in the process. Among the artists he worked with are Boz Scaggs, The Tubes, and Lee Ritenaur.

In 1978, the day after Chicago guitarist Terry Kath died, Champlin received a call from someone connected to the group, suggesting that he audition to take Kath's place. Champlin turned down the offer, saying he couldn't fill those shoes. But a couple of years later, he hooked up with Chicago drummer Danny Seraphine, singing some backgrounds with Peter Cetera on a non-Chicago project. Champlin and Cetera hit it off, (both thought their voices sounded great together). Seraphine and Champlin co-wrote a few tunes, and Champlin was invited to sing one ("Sonny Think Twice") as a guest vocalist on what would eventually become "Chicago 16." Champlin suggested to Seraphine that David Foster might be a good bet as a producer for Chicago at that time.

Serpahine began a campaign to get Champlin into the group (Robert Lamm, initially jealous at the prospect of another keyboard, said, "What the hell do we need him for?"). Reluctant at first, especially after hearing that he'd be singing "Colour My World" ("I never really liked that one much"), Champlin finally said, "Why not? I'll give it a year," and joined the band in 1981 (twenty-five-plus years later, he's still there). He did some guest spots in the meantime (the TV show "Fridays," for example), and was featured singing several songs on "16," including "Bad Advice" and "Follow Me."

1984's "Chicago 17" cemented Champlin's presence in the group. He wrote several great tunes ("Please Hold On," "Remember the Feeling"), and sang (with Cetera) the hit "Hard Habit to Break." When Cetera left in 1985, the focus was expected to switch to Champlin. Instead (after suggesting that Richard Page of "Mister, Mister" replace Cetera), he helped the young Jason Scheff immensely - so much so that Scheff has said he wants to BE Champlin. "Chicago 18" featured several hits sung by Scheff, a situation Scheff acknowledges as being incredibly generous on Champlin's part. In 1988, however, it was Champlin who shined, singing the hits, "Look Away," "I Don't Wanna Live Without Your Love," and "You're Not Alone" (as well as his excellent composition "Come In From the Night") on "Chicago 19."

By the early 90s, Chicago's popularity was beginning to wane ("Chicago 21," featuring the great Champlin tune "Who Do You Love?" sold poorly), and the band recorded the now infamous "Stone of Sisyphus," a project that remains unreleased to this day. Champlin is all over "Sisyphus," singing his heart out on "Mah Jong," "Here With Me," and "The Show Must Go On," and co-penning and singing one of the greatest single Chicago songs in the group's history, "Plaid." (Update: Stone of Sisyphus was released on June 17th, 2008)

Candid, funny, and down to earth, Champlin continues his work with Chicago today, but has also revived the Sons, and has recorded a number of well-reviewed solo CDs ("He Started to Sing" and "Through It All" among them). He sang the theme to TV's "In the Heat of the Night," and seems willing to give dozens of interviews. Bearded and paunchy upon first joining Chicago, Champlin shaved and slimmed down in the late 80s, grew his hair rocker-guy long in the early 90s, trimmed it all by 1994, and now looks like the guy next door. Married for years to his second wife (the singer Tamara Champlin), he has at least two children (his younger son Will is also a musician). In interviews, he admits to being an ex-boozer (this might explain his constant gum chewing), and is by all reports a very nice fellow. He is famous for never singing a song the same way twice (some say Lamm now sings "Colour My World" live for just this reason). Critics suggest that he often 'phones in' his stage performances, particularly with Chicago, and there are times when he seems bored and disinterested live. At other times (especially during the early 80s and the recent Christmas tour), he is up, lively, and a focal point. He is all over the recently released "Chicago XXX," once described by Lamm as a "Jason/Bill project." He has also recently revived the Sons, and they released the excellent CD "Hip Li'l Dreams" in 2005. His addition to Chicago as "the new guy" was a crucial element in their second wave of success, and his presence now is a benefit to anyone who calls himself a fan.

He is the soulful voice who sings the theme to the Carol O'Conner TV Cop show "In the Heat of the Night" (1988)

Leader of the band "Sons of Champlin".

In 1981, he became a member of Chicago, with whom he has recorded and toured ever since, while releasing the occasional solo album.

Oldest son Brad was born in the mid-1960s when Champlin was in his late teens; as the only married man when the Sons of Champlin started, Bill was reportedly the most serious about making his career work.

He and Chicago were awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording at 6438 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

Friends with the Italian producer-arranger-composer-singer-actor Manuel De Peppe.

Personal Quotes

"Right after Terry [Kath] died, I got a call for that gig. And I went, 'I'm not that guitar player. I play guitar, but man, one solo and I'm done. I don't have that kind of depth.' What they really needed was somebody with a voice. I misunderstood what the call was. Otherwise, I'd have thought about it then."

"When I joined [Chicago], Kenny Loggins called me and said 'Man, what are you doing?' He said, 'Those guys are over.'"

(September 2005) In addition to touring with Earth Wind & Fire, Champlin and Chicago have recently finished recording "Chicago XXX," tentatively set for release in the spring of 2006. Champlin fans may take heart in Lamm's description of the album as a "Jason/Bill" project.

(June 2006) On tour with Chicago in support of "Chicago XXX"; he is also on a break from The Sons of Champlin, though it is reported that he hopes to get back into the studio with them soon.

JASON SCHEFF

Vocalist and bassist Jason Scheff was born April 16, 1962 in San Diego, California. His parents divorced when he was young. His dad, Jerry Scheff, made a living playing bass, and toured with Elvis Presley (he's also featured on the famous Doors album "L.A. Woman"). Friends from Jason's early years include big-league pitcher David Wells. As a youth, Scheff tried singing but became frustrated, deciding to concentrate on his bass playing. "Playing the bass was very natural for me, so I knew that it was a gift that my father had given me genetically," he has said (Scheff has two brothers in the music business - Lauren and Darin).

As a teen, Scheff played in local Top 40 bands (one featured his mom!); his first break came when he was 19 and producer Peter Wolf hired him for his band (they opened for the Rolling Stones in Vienna in 1982). Relocating to L.A., Scheff began writing songs and doing recording sessions. His talent soon earned him attention. Returning to vocals, he was making inroads as a solo act when singer Peter Cetera left the rock group Chicago in July of 1985. After considering Richard Page of Mr. Mister for the gig (he turned it down), Chicago stumbled across Scheff almost accidentally. It was for his voice that he was being considered. But when Howard Kaufman, Chicago's manager, found out Scheff played the bass, the deal was sealed.

Being asked to join Chicago was "the last thing that I would have imagined." Chicago was about to go into the studio with producer David Foster to record "Chicago 18," their third set with Foster and the follow-up to their monstrous 17th album. "Chicago 17" had sold millions on the strength of Cetera's voice and songwriting, so Scheff felt some tension about his place in things. To their credit, the rest of the band - especially Bill Champlin - made Scheff feel at home. The sessions went well for the new "New Guy," though the Chicago vets had tired of Foster's very hands-on approach.

"Chicago 18" turned out to be a financial success. Scheff breathed more easily when the single "Will You Still Love Me?" (on which he sang lead) did well on the charts. According to Scheff, this was when he felt that he finally belonged. The album was released in September of 1986, and the band took to the road for a fall tour.

Replacing a focal point like Cetera is never easy, however, and Scheff has had his share of detractors. Realistically, Scheff can't match Cetera's vocals on Cetera's songs, and asking him to do so (and it's obvious he has been asked) isn't fair. Scheff is far better singing his own material. As a bass player and a composer, Scheff is excellent (Robert Lamm has said that Scheff is a better musician than Cetera). The blondish Jason has also served as eye-candy for the female crowd, a role he seems to take in stride (he is also a famously nice guy). As Chicago record sales decreased, Scheff's contributions got better ("What Kind of Man Would I Be?" "If It Were You"), and when the band recorded the notorious, unreleased "Stone of Sisyphus" album in 1993, Scheff contributed a lot of the best material ("Mahh Jong," "The Pull"). He also released a solo CD ("Chauncey") in 1997.

Now in his early forties and married, Scheff (along with Lamm) is reportedly the driving force behind the soon-to-come "Chicago 30," a brand new album of 12 original songs tentatively set for release in the spring of 2006. Produced by Jay DeMarcus of Rascal Flatts (a good friend of Scheff's), Lamm has described the recording as a "Jason/Bill [Champlin] project," so fans of Scheff can take heart.

At age 23, he joined the band Chicago in mid-1985 when Peter Cetera left to pursue a solo career.

He is the son of Jerry Scheff, Elvis Presley's bassist.

He has sung many of Chicago's best songs, including "Will You Still Love Me?", "What Kind of Man Would I Be", "You Come to My Senses", and more recently, "Bigger than Elvis" which was a tribute to his father.

Began performing with his singer/pianist mother at the age of 14 and quickly built a reputation and following on the Southern California club scene.

Wife, Tracy, was previously married to John Clark Gable, the son of actor, Clark Gable.

Has three brothers -- Todd, Darin and Lauren.

Ranked in Golf Digest's "Top 100 in Music" (December 2006 issue) as tied for 15th place with Darius Rucker and Justin Timberlake, with a 6-handicap.

He and Chicago were awarded a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Recording at 6438 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 02.16.10 @ 04:46am


“Ranked in Golf Digest's "Top 100 in Music" (December 2006 issue) as tied for 15th place with Darius Rucker and Justin Timberlake, with a 6-handicap.”

Well that makes all the difference in the world! If he had a 7 handicap, I’d say no, but a 6? Open the doors!

Posted by Ralph on Tuesday, 02.16.10 @ 07:01am



http://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Feelin-Stronger-Every-Day/dp/1550822454/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266596905&sr=1-1

Chicago: Feelin' Stronger Every Day [Illustrated] (Paperback)
~ Ben Joseph (Author)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 02.20.10 @ 04:38am


http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4AE6A569A9EDA15D

Chicago In The Rockies / Meanwhile Back At the Ranch / New Year Party 74-75

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 02.20.10 @ 04:50am


http://www.effingham.net/bishop/DannySeraphineInterview.htm

Danny Seraphine Radio Interview 10/21/94

First, a little background info. I tracked Danny down at a company called Street Sense, Inc. ...didn't know his relationship to or with the company, just knew that he could be reached there...figured maybe it was a management company, so I called and said "I'm calling to talk to someone about Danny Seraphine," to which he replied "This is him"...I told him why I was calling and after a few seconds of thought, he said, "Let's do the interview right now." So here goes...

JD: Why don't you start off by telling me what exactly Street Sense is.

DS: It's a production company. And also a small record company, but basically a production company. I sign unknown talent and develop them in hopes of getting them a major label deal. And if not, then, you know, trying to place them with an independent record company.

JD: How long have you been doing this?

DS: About three years.

JD: Name some of the acts that you work with.

DS: There's a country artist by the name of Matt McKinney, and an alternative band by the name of Love Lies, and a jazz/fusion band called Wake Up Call... none of which have had any successes, but are very talented. And I'm in the process of signing a kind of classic R&B group called Forever. Basically, really talented people. I haven't hit any paydirt yet, but I'm working on some new material with Matt McKinney that I think is really great.

JD: What led you in this direction, as opposed to doing a solo album or session work?

DS: I always liked producing and wanted to produce while I was with Chicago, but because it was so busy, and because I had a different role in that band-- although I was very active in the making of the records--it's just, I really enjoy producing. It's like being the director of a movie, you know? You really are in control of the project and nurturing it from the infancy until the end. And I enjoy that. I probably enjoy it more than playing right now. I miss playing to a certain degree, but I've been wanting to get out and get into production for a long time.

JD: Do you still write for yourself?

DS: No, I haven't been doing much writing.

JD: So you aren't working with Hawk Wolinski or anyone like that.

DS: No. But actually, we are in contact quite a bit. We talk about working together, but...[laughs] he's in Nashville.

JD: The last few albums you were on with Chicago, the drumming got more and more computer-oriented.

DS: Yeah. Absolutely. At first I really, really fought it. I hated it. And then, what happened was, whenever there was any programming done--none was done on 16, 16 was all live drums--but 17...I was one of those guys that really, really tried to stay away from anything to do with drum machines. Hated 'em. In those days, it really put the drummer in a very subservient position. People started really bashing drummers, you know? Keyboard players, especially. It was terrible. "We've got a machine now that's gonna replace you guys and it doesn't talk back, it keeps perfect time, and we can program it to play exactly what WE want." You know what I'm saying? And then I started hearing all these records that were being programmed by what I could tell were keyboard players--non-drummers. You could just hear it. So I said to myself, "Well, you can fight it or you can learn it and take it to another level," so I bought a SP-12, which at that time was the top drum machine. It was the only sampling drum machine. So I bought one, and we were off the road for quite awhile, so I just took it and learned it inside and out. And then I got myself this really extravagant MIDI setup, with pads, and a computer, and the whole shot, and in fact I just put my sticks down and started programming, because I thought, "Shit, if I want to hear better programming, then I better do it myself." So the 17th album, I didn't like some of the parts that were programmed off that 17, but it's a great record. It wasn't all programmed, but parts of it were. Now the 18th album, I think I programmed every note except for one ballad--I forget the name of the song--I overdubbed some drums. And the 19th record, I think I programmed one song. Everything else I played live.

JD: That's interesting, because on 19 there are something like six programmers and five keyboard players listed.

DS: Yeah, but if I'm correct, there was only one song..."Heart In Pieces," I think the name of it is...that was programmed. On a Fairlight, I programmed it. Everything else is just played live. You can kinda tell, you know? Especially in those days. Now it's getting harder to tell. I still do quite a bit of programming, but it's more...I play it in real time, with pads and stuff. For some things...I wouldn't necessarily say it's better, because I like live drums. Acoustic drums breathe, you know? But there is some good stuff out there digitally that you can make sound real.

JD: I always thought it was interesting. Because in the early part of your career, you were a hell of a drummer, but to trace the progression...on the last couple of albums, it was just...

DS: Well, there wasn't much I could do about that. It was delegated. As a musician, you have to play what's right for the songs, and I wasn't able to stretch like I did in the early days. I certainly miss that. I can still play, don't worry. [laughs] I don't know if I can play as well as I did when I was really a drum fanatic, but you still carry a lot of that. I'll always have chops. At least, until my hands fall off.

JD: Do you think, at any point, you will find yourself recording a solo album?

DS: Yeah, I do! At some point...I keep threatening to. I'd love to do a Big Band project. But I'm pretty much immersed in what I'm doing now. You know, developing artists and producing. So I don't really have the time for that. But yeah, someday I will. I really need to, because it is a dream of mine, and you have to follow your dreams.

JD: Well, you really deserve a solo album, because like I said, you're a hell of a drummer.

DS: Well, thank you. That's really nice of you. It's amazing that you tracked me down [laughs].

JD: Well, I've been trying to track you down for about three years now.

DS: Really. I imagine if you call the Chicago offices, they don't know, do they?

JD: Right. I started calling their management right about the time TWENTY 1 came out, and they had no comment...and there was no comment until I interviewed Peter Cetera in October of '92.

DS: Oh, REALLY.

JD: ...And he told me that you were fired.

DS: Yeah, but how did he say it?

JD: He said that you'd been fired because you no longer fit in with the stage presentation. Which I thought was kind of odd, but I--

DS: Peter Cetera said that? REALLY? I no longer fit in with the...sounds like he didn't know what to say.

JD: And then I went so far as to interview Jude Cole, but he told me that he didn't know how to get in touch with you, and that exhausted my leads.

DS: Yeah, I haven't talked to Jude for awhile. He's a good guy, though, and he's very talented. I like him a lot.

JD: And then somebody on the Internet gave me the address for Street Sense...

DS: Really? How funny.

JD: Tell me how you got interested in drumming in the first place.

DS: My uncle was a drummer, and I was about eight or nine years old...I started when I was nine, so I was probably about eight...I used to see him playing at weddings. I was also a pretty crazy kid, all that energy and stuff. A really Type A personality. I still am, but I'm a lot better than I was. So I really needed an outlet, and I was fortunate to find it at such an early age. So my parents got me a little drum kit, and I practiced on that, and then a snare drum, and then a bass drum, and then I got a tom-tom, and it just kind of evolved. I started studying at a very young age, and then kind of fell off the studying thing for awhile, and took it on my own, and then I got to a point where I was pretty much stalled. I think I was about fifteen. And then when I was about seventeen, I started studying with a guy at DePaul University by the name of Bob Tillis, who was renowned. He's passed away, but in those days he was a renowned educator and percussionist. Incredible. That's where I really developed my technique and my style, and that's why I always thought my style was very unique and different from Bobby Colomby of Blood, Sweat, and Tears. Bobby was more jazz-oriented, but could play rock and roll and R&B, and I was more rock and roll and R&B, and I could play jazz, so I played a little harder, with a little more tack, but I still had the chops and the finesse. Then, when I moved to L.A. with the band, when we first moved there, I got hooked up with a guy by the name of Chuck Flores. Great drummer. He played on a lot of Woody Herman things...Shelley Mann...tutored him...and he was a great, great drummer, and he helped me a lot. And then when we used to go to New York and record, some of our early records were done in New York, I got connected with Papa Joe Jones--probably the all-time greatest brush player-- and studied with him whenever we were in New York. So I was really in that mode for a long time, and it really obviously helped develop my technique. That's kind of the capsulized version. [laughs]

JD: I think you've always been really underrated. You ought to be up there where Porcaro was before he died, or even, say, Jim Keltner.

DS: Yeah, I probably should be, but I'm not going to lose any sleep over it. I tell you what, yes, you're right, and probably one of the reasons was that I was so commercially successful. People tend to take that for granted, or that tends to taint your artistic image. Because all those guys used to tell me that they looked up to me--Porcaro, Keltner--and that they thought a lot of my playing, and when they did interviews they would even say so, but what are you gonna do? Probably because Chicago...we went from a very, very incredibly artistic kind of band to incredibly commercial. A lot of people were really put off in some ways by our departure from more artistic approaches to the commercial, but yet respected us for standing the test of time in some ways. Still being successful after so many years, and having so many comebacks. I think at some point when we made that departure, we lost something, and we lost a lot of fans, and I probably lost--I became, like you say, basically a ballad drummer. I mean, I enjoyed it to a degree, because if you saw us live, even then, I would tear ass, you know? But I wasn't able to do it on record, really. But that was the way music was if you were a recording band. I think if Chicago had stayed true to what they really were, today they would be like the Grateful Dead, with huge gigantic followings. I really believe that, because Chicago had a huge following, and we may have maintained a level of success by having all these hit singles, but I think what we sold was a loyal following.

JD: Well, possibly...but you guys lost your rudder creatively around 1980 or so.

DS: There were a couple of times when we lost our rudder [laughs].

JD: There wasn't any kind of artistic direction--

DS: What albums were around 1980, do you know?

JD: XIV.

DS: Was that the thumbprint? You gotta remember, that was a really tough time. Terry died. And so, I'm not making excuses, but you have to understand that when you've got guys in the band that have serious drug problems and alcohol problems, you've got Peter, who was about ready to leave the band--he had one foot out of the boat and was ready to go, he just wasn't happy--it was a very, very tough situation. It wasn't Tom Dowd's fault.

JD: No, it wasn't. But if David Foster hadn't come along, I wonder who would have stepped to the forefront.

DS: I'm the one who got David Foster. See, no one talks about the things I did during that era. The band was, you're right. "Lost its rudder" is an understatement. The band had gotten--some of the guys, a couple of the guys were really messed up on drugs. Obviously Terry died, you know, he had a very bad drug problem. And it's sad, because I think it contributed to his death. And subsequently, there were a couple of guys in the band who were really, seriously into cocaine. It was a bad problem, and a real tough era for the band and everybody, and I was probably one of the only coherent ones at the time. I wasn't really elected as leader, but I kind of took over and...the things that I did that were probably most instrumental during that era were, I went out and got David Foster to produce Chicago--you can ask David, hopefully he'll give me credit for it, but it doesn't really matter, I know-- and I got Howard Kaufman and Irving Azoff to manage the band, and lastly, I brought Bill Champlin into the band, because after Terry departed, there was a big void as far as an R&B voice. So, those three things, I think, were really instrumental as far as bringing the band back. But have I ever gotten credit for it? Behind doors, yeah, "Great job." But in the press, Irving, somebody takes credit for it, but I was the one who brought David in. In fact, on the fourteenth album, I was voted down. I went and approached David to do that record myself, took a meeting with him, and was voted down by the record company and the band.

JD: I think the book for "Group Portrait" says something about how David Foster almost produced XIV.

DS: Yeah, but that book practically wrote me out of the script. That's the part of the band that I find very tacky and very offensive. Because I started the band, you know? They were saying it was Walt's idea, that's really, really not true. Walt Parazaider was going to...when I decided to put the band together, Walt and Terry and I had been in two other bands prior to this, but Walter was just getting his degree in clarinet and was being groomed for a seat on the Chicago Symphony. And Terry had played bass in the other bands prior to Chicago. Incredible bass player, but he wanted to play guitar, so another band called the Illinois Speed Press had given him an offer to play guitar with them and go out to the West Coast. The whole hippie thing was just starting to happen. And Walter was going to get his degree, and play on the symphony, and teach. That was his dream, and that's what he was going to do. I mean, when I say it was my idea, I had no idea that it would evolve into what it did. I just wanted to put together a great band, a horn band, with all the best players in the city, and good vocalists, together. And that's what I did. When I say it's what I did...I said "Walter, let's put a band together, let's give it one more try," and I had to twist his arm for maybe five minutes. That was the inception, that's how the band was born. And Terry, it was the same thing. "Terry, instead of going to California, why don't you stay here and play with us? We know how great you are, you've always wanted to play..." It was just meant to be, all the pieces kind of fell together, and the first rehearsal was very magical. But what bothers me is that I was written out of that whole...it was during the lawsuit, because I was suing them. But that's the way it is.

JD: It's always bothered me that you just disappeared and nobody really had any explanation why.

DS: You know, they really couldn't. They couldn't in a sense because I think it was pretty embarrassing. To do what they did to somebody who was with them for twenty-five years. So I think that they were, and probably still are, somewhat ashamed of what they did and how it was done. Hey, life goes on. My life has gone on and their life has gone on. But has anybody benefited from it? That's the hard part. I don't think so. They certainly haven't reached any new heights without me. I think what they lost was someone who really, really loved the music and loved the band and cared about the band, and knew really what was good for the band. And I think that in losing that, they lost someone who was willing to take chances and stand up for what he believed, and now they basically are a bunch of followers trying to be leaders, and when you have that combination it's pretty bad. And that's about as deep as I want to get into the Chicago thing, because it's just...I don't want to rehash it anymore. Someday I may write a book, and really go into it in detail, not just to slam anybody, but the whole odyssey. And that was part of it, you know?

JD: For my last question, I was going to ask you why you did in fact leave Chicago, but if that's as far as you want to get into it, then that's as far as you want to get into it. There still is a lot of intense speculation. There are a lot of people who claim to know why you left.

DS: Well, they probably do. You might ask them. I'd be curious [laughs]...to get into detail, if I do that, I'd probably need a chapter in a book to explain it without making it sound like I'm the complete victim. Because, listen, I wasn't a total innocent bystander. I just wasn't. And I don't want to portray it like they're these bad guys, because they're not. They're good guys, and they just got misguided and made a mistake and got too far into it to change. Whether they would admit to it or not, I don't know.

JD: Are there any performers out there you'd really like to drum with?

DS: Um...yeah. Probably. I'd love to play with Elton...

JD: He NEEDS a drummer.

DS: Does he really?

JD: Well, he needs to get away from all the machines.

DS: Is that what he plays with live?

JD: No, but his records are full of synths and drum machines, and it sounds really sick.

DS: He'll probably get back to a live drummer...Billy, I went to see Billy, and it would be fun playing with him. Wynnona. Anybody who makes good music, you know? Steely Dan...of course, they've got Dennis Chambers. He's a monster. I never thought they really gave him a good shot.

JD: Would you ever think about going back on the road?

DS: Yeah, given the right opportunity I would.

JD: Well, I've had you for about half an hour, so I should let you get back to what you were doing. I want to thank you for your time.

DS: Man, I think it's wild that someone from the Bay Area would look me up. Although I was down there doing a benefit for Tony La Russa. He's a very close friend of mine. It was for Animal Rescue, with my country artists. We played in Walnut Creek. If he asked me to come down again, I'd love to.

--Jeff

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 05:06am


WHAT CHICAGO SHOULD HAVE DONE!

When Clive Davis, James William Guercio and record executives at CBS back in the early 70's would tell Chicago that they wanted to shorten their songs so they could have them played on the radio, Chicago should have said, you know what, to hell with you and to hell with radio! We don't want to be on the radio! We are an album oriented band! This is our music and you do what we tell you to do with our music! We are the artiists! If people want to hear our music they can buy the albums! We are not chopping up our material for you and we are not going to become a pop band. Jazz-Rock Fusion and 10 to 14 minute suites are here to stay!

Leonard Cohen spent his entire career as an underground, album oriented artist. He never had a song released as a single and his songs never played on the radio. No one ever told him he had to have a hit! He never had a song chart on the Billboard 100, but his albums charted on the Billboard 200. People bought his albums, attended his concerts, he was revered and that was it! He was also with CBS as well before they became COLUMBIA/SONY. Now Leonard Cohen is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Chicago isn't!

The Grateful Dead were underground artists for most of their career. They stayed true to their music. No one told them what to do. The Grateful Dead are the # 6 charting Rock band of all time on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart behind The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, Chicago and The Bee-Gees. But the Grateful Dead only had 12 Billboard 100 singles and only one of them was a Top 40 hit and a Top 10 hit, and that was Touch of Grey in 1986. The Grateful Dead were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Chicago wasn't!

A quote from Chicago's original drummer, Danny Seraphine:

I think if Chicago had stayed true to what they really were, today they would be like the Grateful Dead, with huge gigantic followings. I really believe that, because Chicago had a huge following, and we may have maintained a level of success by having all these hit singles, but I think what we sold was a loyal following.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 05:54am


Roy...there are some of us who were growing up during Chicago's heyday that just didn't think they're all that hot (for my part, I liked songs by Blood, Sweat, and Tears, Tower of Power, The Ides of March, and Sly & the Family Stone a little better)...even though I thought the world of Terry Kath as a guitarist (I thought a big part of that group died with him). As for the Hall of Fame, they're kind of a "hard sell" for me (if our high school band would've played "25 or 6 to 4" one more time, I would've been physically ill).

Why don't you just keep it down to your personal thoughts on them and quit posting these "novels"...some of actually experienced their heyday, and can draw our own conclusions...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 08:03am


Roy
Unlike some.. I like Chicago .I ALSO LIKE BLOOD SWEAT and TEARS..Chicago are still making music and they are really good..! I would not be surprise if they get In. Time will tell.

Posted by mrxyz on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 08:27am


http://digitaldreamdoor.nutsie.com/pages/music0.html

THE DIGITAL DREAM DOOR'S LISTS

GREATEST ROCK ARTISTS: # 96 - Chicago
GREATEST ROCK ARTISTS OF THE '70s: # 20 - Chicago
GREATEST ROCK ARTISTS OF THE '80s: # 84 - Chicago
GREATEST SOFT ROCK ARTISTS: # 9 - Chicago
GREATEST ROCK GUITARISTS: # 54 - Terry Kath
GREATEST ROCK GUITAR SOLOS: # 75 - Terry Kath, 25 Or 6 To 4, # 186 - Terry Kath, Liberation
GREATEST ROCK BASS PERFORMANCES: # 83 - Peter Cetera, I'm A Man, # 200 - Peter Cetera, Liberation
GREATEST ROCK BASS LINES: # 79 - Chicago, 25 Or 6 To 4
GREATEST ROCK DRUMMERS: HONORABLE MENTION - Danny Seraphine
GREATEST ROCK KEYBOARDISTS/PIANISTS: # 64 - Robert Lamm
GREATEST ROCK KEYBOARD PERFORMANCES: # 166 - Robert Lamm, Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?, # 190 - Saturday in the Park
GREATEST MALE ROCK VOCALISTS: # 46 - Peter Cetera
GREATEST ROCK SONGWRITERS: # 144 - Robert Lamm, James Pankow, Terry Kath & Peter Cetera
GREATEST ROCK GUITAR ALBUMS: # 26 - Chicago Transit Authority, # 84 - Chicago VIII
GREATEST ALBUMS OF THE '60S: # 73 - Chicago Transit Authority
GREATEST ROCK DEBUT ALBUMS: # 19 - Chicago Transit Authority
GREATEST DOUBLE ALBUMS: # 33 - Chicago Transit Authority, # 56 - Chicago II
GREATEST ROCK SONGS: # 223 - 25 Or 6 To 4
GREATEST ROCK BALLADS: # 31 - You're the Inspiration, # 40 - Hard To Say I'm Sorry, # 98 - Glory of Love, # 122 - Will You Still Love Me
GREATEST ROCK INSTRUMENTALS: # 214 - Liberation
GREATEST LOVE SONGS: # 58 - You're the Inspiration, # 67 - Glory of Love
GREATEST MODERN MALE POP VOCALIST: # 6 - Peter Cetera
GREATEST FUSION KEYBOARDISTS: # 46 - Robert Lamm
GREATEST FUSION HORNS: # 20 - James Pankow, # 25 - Walter Parazaider, # 31 - Lee Loughnane
GREATEST FUSION DRUMMERS: # 44 - Danny Seraphine
GREATEST FUSION SONGS: # 21 - Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is, # 37 - The Approaching Storm
GREATEST FUSION ALBUMS: # 17 - Chicago Transit Authority, HONORABLE MENTION - Chicago II, Chicago III

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 15:14pm


"In my opinion they are the worst snub for a group, as far as solo artists go you tell me how Neil Diamond isn't in the Hall." Everyone keeps complaining about this but don't bother with specifics, which I do for my snubs. Care to make a case for Mr. Diamond (aside from longevity)?

"No Moody Blues, no Yes, no Chicago, no ELP, no Rush, no Tull, no Purple, no Alice, no Hall and Oates, no ELO, no Cars, no Feat...." Since you brought up prog, what about King Crimson? You forgot some other major artists.

"Perhaps the most embarassing thing to the Hall I can think of is that this band is not in the Hall of fame. And it is compounded yearly with the grandmaster flash's- and bogus inductees that follow." Not the most embarassing by any means. Sales isn't everything.

"Well, you can't use Grandmaster Flash as a basis of comparison since that's a completely different genre. Flash was a pioneer in hip-hop and deserves to be in." Someone sees sense, unlike the overweight wimpy 40-year old soulless whites (I'm 20 and white myself)/aging hippies that visit these boards.
"It makes more sense to compare Chicago to other '70s classic rock bands that are in, such as Traffic, Skynyrd, or Bob Seger. It's unclear to me why any of those three are in and Chicago is out. I'm not even a big fan but the numbers don't lie." Ditto. Some people have been scratching their heads over Traffic, and I'm not sure Seger did anything that Bruce didn't do better. Skynyrd's okay because they helped bring Southern Rock to the masses, and are one of the quintessential Southern bands.

1) "Are Chicago REALLY the most successful band of all time?" No, not even close.
2) "Does touring for forty years automatically warrant induction?" It's not part of the criteria.
3) "The Rolling Stones are already in the Hall Of Fame. First ballot. Who woulda thunk it?" Yep, try doing research before posting.

IF Chicago were the first to mix jazz and rock, and were the first to use a horn section, then they should be in. If they didn't do either of those then it's going to be a hard sell for me, because I don't hear much about their influence. Actually, I'm almost prepared to say no right now unless someone either destroys Roy's computer or blocks him from the site. Direct us to the bloody site and stop giving us novels. Twat.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 15:49pm


Sam

If you were talking to me, I don't know what I wrote to make you think that I didn't know the Rolling Stones were in the Rock Hall. I know they are.

I posted the top 6 charting Rock and Roll bands of all-time on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart and stated that Chicago was the only band on that list who have not been inducted yet.

The Top 6 Charting Rock bands of all-time on Billboard 200

The Beatles
The Rolling Stones
The Beach Boys
Chicago
The Bee-Gees
The Grateful Dead

Chicago is the only band on the list that has not been inducted yet.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 15:59pm


But that isn't what happened. I'm not sure that I agree with your perspective. I find Danny's comment very interesting. In the first clause, he speaks from the perspective of someone who wasn't a member of the band and part of the decisions that "cost them" a huge following in his opinion. Certainly that was not the case. And now he performs covers of some of the very songs that his comment appears to criticize because they were popular on the radio.

Hindsight's always 20/20. In this case, I am not sure I agree with your conclusion.

Posted by chinolefan on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:12am


Interesting thoughts. I know I was one fan they lost when they got too "radio-oriented."

Posted by ftg3plus4 on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:13am


Fair enough, but there are probably also a number of fans who became fans because of airplay on popular radio, too.

Posted by chinolefan on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:14am


With all due respect, chinolefan, I don't see Danny's comments as negative at all towards the band - just the opposite.

It would have been great had Chicago had that attitude with the biz in the beginning, and I remember Robert saying that they never intended to be a Top 40 singles band. They were innovative and daring with their writing in the beginning but they strayed from that, I'm sure largely in part from pressures from the label to crank out more radio-friendly songs. This was a sacrifice that was necessary (at least from the way they viewed things) in order to get more radio play and to reach a wider audience.

However, once Chicago turned to more ballads and more music that abandoned their original vision, it's no secret that a number of the diehards from the early days became confused and Chicago's loyal fan base changed. Yes, they developed a new following with a new generation of fans. But I believe what Danny says is true to a certain degree. It's disappointing that Chicago can't sell out stadiums like they did in the '70's and early '80's because they should be able to. The majority of their audience is different now, I think, as there are many more casual fans that just want to enjoy some great music on a summer evening and not nearly as many diehards like you and me that have followed the band through most if not all of their career and been there for them through all the changes through the years.

I don't think Danny is criticizing the band's work at all. Rather, he is paying tribute to all the great music from the early days of the band and wants to keep it alive (as well as throwing in some GREAT covers from other groups as well in his fantastic live shows). I believe he is proud of what he and the band accomplished in the '70's and I admire and respect him for what he is doing today.

I also respect your view on this issue as well. This is just the way I see it.

Oh, and Roy, I understand what you are saying about what the band should have said. However, the music business doesn't exactly work that way. Artists signed to a major label do not call the shots. It might be a little more liberal today, but it definitely wasn't in the '70's. Artists back then were at the mercy of a record label and if they didn't agree with what the label wanted for them, there would have been no chance of being signed. If Chicago had not gone the route of going through a major label like Columbia (thanks to Jim Guercio's connections) there would have been no way they would have become as popular as they did in such a short time. They would have struggled a lot in the beginning for recognition without that influence. Record companies spend a lot of money to promote musicians and that is why they exert so much power over them if they are signed. I'm not saying I necessarily agree with major labels and all their decisions. I am just stating facts.

Posted by stratwoman on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:15am


Thanks for your perspective, stratwoman. I am not trying to be overly critical of Danny - I enjoy his new work, and I greatly respect his contributions to the legacy that is Chicago. Whether or not he's "criticizing" the band isn't really the point. I just find his comments and his actions are somewhat in conflict with one another.

I also recognize and agree that there are a number of original fans who couldn't or wouldn't accept that the band has changed over the years. Furthermore, I agree that some members of the band (past and present) may not have liked the more commercial direction that was taken. They didn't have complete control over their future - there were some trade-offs.

Where our perspectives diverge relates to what the band's following might be today if they hadn't made some of the afore-mentioned changes and even some trade-offs throughout the years. One of the many reasons that I continue to be a die-hard fan of Chicago is that their musical history is diverse, and they continue to tour extensively. With all due respect to Grateful Dead (since that is the example shared in the original post), there is no comparison on those terms.

Posted by chinolefan on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:16am


Art and money have always been an uneasy mix. My main problem with the music industry, particularly in regards to how a band like Chicago got treated by it, is that it's primarily concerned with selling to the vast majority of consumers who are not truly "music" people.

Posted by ftg3plus4 on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:17am


It's always easy to revert to the "what if" in life and to project our own opinions into what we believe would have happened if decisions were different. No one (including Danny and the band members themselves) has any idea how their career would have turned out if they remained an album oriented band and did not modify their songs to fit radio airplay.

In fact, if it wasn't for these choices, the band may have fizzled out (as so many other bands have) as a result of not going in that direction. I think that the airplay gave the band a wider audience and, although the prevailing view is that being labeled a "ballad band" was a detriment, it couldn't have done that much damage if they're still touring.

Obviously, the music industry has changed over the years and if Chicago would have remained "true" to their roots, they may not have been able to survive as long as they have. I agree that they've experienced difficulty in selling new material, but the true fans value what the band has put out over the years. I don't know that many musicians start out with the goal of being a "Top 40" band, but that's not necessarily a negative means to an end. It's the Top 40 stuff that has kept the band alive and well in the eyes of the paying public and allows them to live the lifestyle that they have become accustomed to. Nothing wrong with that!!!

Lots of people love the classic Chicago songs and that's all part of their longevity. The fact that the band still fills venues; albeit not the arenas that they did in the past, is a testiment to their musical legacy. Speculation about what would have happened had they not deviated from their original innovations is wishful thinking at best. You can't rewrite history and fantasizing about what could have been can be fun, but I accept the band just as they are....warts and all!!

Posted by Carollugiano on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 10:18am


Reading back, I am jarred by the comment that Leonard Cohen "is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Chicago isn't!" That has nothing to do with the path chosen by Chicago and its "handlers" in my humble opinion. Obviously, there are plenty of artists in the RRHOF who are known ONLY because they were on the radio. That issue is way to tedious to waste on this board.

Posted by chinolefan on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 17:39pm


"Sam

If you were talking to me, I don't know what I wrote to make you think that I didn't know the Rolling Stones were in the Rock Hall. I know they are." Sorry about that Roy. I was not talking to you. This was the quote in question:

ON ANOTHER NOTE: WHAT ABOUT THE ROLLING STONES AND THE DO0BIE BROTHERS?

WHO IS IN CHARGE OF THIS CIRCUS?

MJB...SEATTLE

Posted by MJB on Saturday, 06.23.07 @ 14:46pm

I saw that and I wrote that people should do their homework before they come on here. I think I'd pick Deep Purple and T. Rex before the Doobie Brothers (part of that's logic and part of that's personal taste.)

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 20:07pm


What makes a band legendary, IMHO, is that their music holds up over time. The Stones, the Beatles, so much of it could have been written last week or 40 years ago. That's what I enjoy about Chicago. Whether it be "Beginnings" or some of the songs on "Sublety & Passion", it still sounds good. And every band has some period in time when it wasn't what some of us wanted it to be. Looks at the crowds they attract to their shows, from age 14 to the AARP members. And the fans still keep coming back. Can we get past the "what they should have sounded like, or what they should have done" phase please? Judge them for their sound, influence, fans and lasting energy.

Just my thoughts.

Posted by Kathy on Thursday, 03.11.10 @ 13:12pm


Who's Leonard Cohen? Without radio that's what we'd be saying about Chicago. Sorry to disagree but I knew very few "underground" types back in the day. My first taste of Chicago was hearing "Beginnings" on the radio. IMO Chicago took the correct career path.

Posted by Beginnings on Thursday, 03.11.10 @ 15:40pm


Correct career path? are you kidding me? Why are they on shows like the Bachelor, skating specials??? thats not a band, thats a circus act that does whatever they can to make money, or to sneak their way into everyones tv sets since now they can't even get much radio play!!

I agree with the original post and what Danny said, they shoulda been loyal to their real fans, and themselves as musicians.

Suck ups don't get much praise, and they deserve to be in the position they're in.

All these inspiration/hard habit/ hard to say im sorry/80's lovers....we don't need you. That's not Chicago. Chicago didn't write those songs as a democracy, Chicago didn't even fully play those songs on album either. It's a disgrace.

Nuff said

Posted by geraci89 on Thursday, 03.11.10 @ 15:41pm


I'm just ornery enough not to consider your comments as "nuff said" geraci89. The point is, it is YOUR opinion, and you are entitled to it, but your post is stated in a totally unacceptable manner. "Circus act?" Guess I must like the circus after all. As for the band "deserving" the position that they are in - I haven't heard a great deal of concern raised by any of the band members regarding their current position.

Posted by chinolefan on Thursday, 03.11.10 @ 18:03pm


I first saw Chicago at the Aire Crown theater and remember how they used to play for hours and played with an in-your-face attitude. Now is almost seems like they rent out the Chicago logo for dates, sometimes there seems to be more people that aren't in the band as there are members.

I have to give it to Robert, he is the only one with the commitment to the fans that is always with the band.

Just for comparison, listen to live versions of Free, Introduction, Dialogue or really any of the tunes from when the original band played and compare them to any live versions of the songs now. There is no comparison! The songs are so laid back and jazzy it could be elevator music.

And for those who say well the band is older now, listen to current music from Paul Rodgers, Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, Robin Trower or many of the people who have been around for decades and still rock.

Posted by mja1951 on Friday, 03.12.10 @ 03:39am



OPENING LINES

Sitting on a park bench -- eyeing little girls with bad intent

-Aqualung, Jethro Tull

Children play in the park, they don't know
I'm alone in the dark, even though

-Make Me Smile, Chicago

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.14.10 @ 08:26am


http://www.bostonherald.com/entertainment/music/general/view.bg?&articleid=1239509&format=&page=1&listingType=musi#articleFull

BOSTON HERALD

Omission accomplished

15 acts that should be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

4. Chicago (eligible since 1994)

Chicago pioneered horn-fueled rock (along with Blood, Sweat & Tears, another band unjustly shut out of the Hall of Fame). You mean the 120 million records they’ve sold worldwide just isn’t enough? Guess not. Instead, we’re inducting ABBA. At this rate, KC and the Sunshine Band has a better shot of being inducted before powerhouse Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 03.15.10 @ 09:18am


Sadly..as like years gone by Chicago is again "forgotten" in the Hall of SHAME. As Terry said years ago "!F JAN"
Sadly they will never get in, sadly the idiots will pay to go there to see rappers and goofs.
The Chicago touring is not one tenth of the old Chicago..but.bottom line is this.Since 1995' we fans have been f-ed over and they have too!
Nomore $$ to cleveland and to this second rate full of shit Hall of Shame!

Posted by David Booth on Monday, 03.15.10 @ 19:09pm


It's been said that Chicago is not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame because no one in the music industry sites them as an influence. No band has ever copied their style or sound. No band since Chicago has had a piano player, a drummer, two guitarists and three hornsmen.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 03.18.10 @ 09:20am


"No band since Chicago has had a piano player, a drummer, two guitarists and three hornsmen."

Uh Roy, The Blues Brothers are holding on Line 1 for you.

Posted by Ralph on Thursday, 03.18.10 @ 09:25am


BOSTON HERALD

Omission accomplished

15 acts that should be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

4. Chicago (eligible since 1994)

Chicago pioneered horn-fueled rock (along with Blood, Sweat & Tears, another band unjustly shut out of the Hall of Fame). You mean the 120 million records they’ve sold worldwide just isn’t enough? Guess not. Instead, we’re inducting ABBA. At this rate, KC and the Sunshine Band has a better shot of being inducted before powerhouse Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 03.15.10 @ 09:18am

First of all, if you're using sales as your reasoning, then why aren't you making a stand for Celine Dion, Journey, and lightweights such as the Backstreet Boys? (Rhetorical question.) Secondly, did you actually read that article you posted? I love Stevie Ray Vaughan, but there's no way you can convince me that he's the number one omission. Likewise, KISS should be in, just like Stevie, but if anyone believes that they're the biggest omission in their genre they're just uninformed. Ditto for Def Leppard and Heart. They say about Three Dog Night: "Lead singer Chuck Negron wrote the book on rock-star excess." I believe Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones would like a word with you. That's their 15th. 14: Heart. "How many kick-butt rock bands fronted by women have been inducted into the Hall of Fame? One: The Pretenders, in 2005." True, but from what I can tell The Runaways had the bigger influence on female rockers, and prior to The Runaways females singing about sex and excess and rocking just as hard as the guys was for the most part taboo, which is why they weren't as big as they should've been. #10: Dire Straits. I like Dire Straits, and Mark Knopfler is a fantastic guitarist, as they say, but they only make a case for them based on the music, which is nice but not enough. 9: Def Leppard. "Black Sabbath's already in, so let's give their latter-day Birmingham counterparts their due. Sabbath's Tony Iommi lost the tips of two fingers, but Rick Allen lost an arm and is still Def Leppard's drummer." (Screams, paces around the room breaking things.) As a Brit, I can say first that this lack of research destroys any credibility that the article might've had, as Def Leppard are from Sheffield, which is in the county of South Yorkshire, whereas Birmingham is in West Midlands county. They might have DL confused with Judas Priest, who are way ahead in the line. Where's T. Rex, Deep Purple, Priest, Iron Maiden, Joy Division, Alice Cooper, The Smiths, I could go on. It seems their list was put together based on personal taste rather than research or logic, but what do you expect from a Boston newspaper? Only kidding :) Go Yankees!

Posted by Sam on Saturday, 03.20.10 @ 17:40pm


If ever Chicago will be inducted, it's ONLY because of their body of work during the Terry Kath-era (some may call it the producer Guercio-era Columbia -era) from 1969-1977 or in terms of albums, from "Chicago Transit Authority" to "Chicago XI".
Honor should only be given to the seven original members and their original producer James William Guercio.

The seven original members who have made Chicago a legend are:

Terry Kath (guitar - vocals)
Robert Lamm (keyboards- vocals)
Peter Cetera (bass - vocals)
Danny Seraphine (drums)
James Pankow (trombone)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, flugelhorn)
Walt Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)

Special mention:
Laudir de Oliveira (percussion)

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 04.1.10 @ 16:52pm


Chicago's body of work from 1986- present is anemic compared to the legendary Terry Kath-era Chicago from 1969-1977. The middle period from 1978-1984 are very good in commercial terms.
My point is, the band's longevity has nothing to do with their induction chances. Some bands who have been inducted already were only together for a few years.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 04.1.10 @ 16:56pm


AudiophilePhil, that's not going to happen! The Rock Hall inducted 12 members of the Grateful Dead and 16 members of Parliament Funkadelic, and seeing which members of The Hollies and Genesis were inducted this year, this is the most likely scenario for Chicago:

INDUCTEES

The Original 7

Terry Kath
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine

OTHER MEMBERS WHO WILL BE INDUCTED:

Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin - YES! MAJOR WRITER; SINGER! 28 YEARS WITH CHICAGO
Jason Scheff - YES! MAJOR WRITER; SINGER! 25 YEARS WITH CHICAGO
Tris Imboden - YES! SECOND DRUMMER - almost 25 years - 5 studio albums

WON'T BE INDUCTED

Chris Pinnick - Guitarist (Chicago 14-17)
DaWayne Bailey - Guitarist (Chicago 18-21; Stone of Sisyphus)
Keith Howland - Guitarist (1995-present-Touring; Chicago XXX)

Like it or not, Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff will be inducted with Chicago! They sang lead on many of Chicago's songs and they wrote a lot too. But their biggest hits as singers with Chicago were written by outside writers (Will You Still Love Me and Look Away).

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

SCENARIO 1 - 12 Inductees

Terry Kath
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff
Tris Imboden

SCENARIO 2 - 10 Inductees

Terry Kath
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera
James Pankow
Lee Loughnane
Walter Parazaider
Danny Seraphine
Laudir De Oliveira
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 04.3.10 @ 13:09pm


I will repeat my previous post.

"Chicago's body of work from 1986- present is anemic compared to the legendary Terry Kath-era Chicago from 1969-1977. The middle period from 1978-1984 are very good in commercial terms.
My point is, the band's longevity has nothing to do with their induction chances. Some bands who have been inducted already were only together for a few years."

So, Champlin and specially Scheff don't deserve to be inducted together with the original 7. When they joined the band, they were no longer releasing important albums. Their album releases from the 90's to the present are mostly "best of" and "greatest hits" compilations.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 04.8.10 @ 10:44am


Only those who were members while Terry Kath was alive should be inducted.

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 04.8.10 @ 12:00pm


"They don't give a damn about any trumpet playing band. It ain't what they call rock and roll."

Posted by joker on Thursday, 04.8.10 @ 12:08pm


"They don't give a damn about any trumpet playing band. It ain't what they call rock and roll."

Posted by joker

Joker, you are too funny, bro

Posted by Jonny on Thursday, 04.8.10 @ 12:43pm


Chicago studio albums that Bill Champlin performs on:

01. Chicago 16
02. Chicago 17
03. Chicago 18
04. Chicago 19
05. Twenty 1
06. Stone of Sisyphus
07. Night and Day
08. Chicago XXX

Chicago studio albums that Jason Scheff performs on:

01. Chicago 18
02. Chicago 19
03. Twenty 1
04. Stone of Sisyphus
05. Night and Day
06. Chicago XXX

Posted by Roy on Friday, 04.9.10 @ 11:42am


Chicago studio albums that Bill Champlin performs on:

01. Chicago 16
02. Chicago 17
03. Chicago 18
04. Chicago 19
05. Twenty 1
06. Stone of Sisyphus
07. Night and Day
08. Christmas Album
09. Chicago XXX

Chicago studio albums that Jason Scheff performs on:

01. Chicago 18
02. Chicago 19
03. Twenty 1
04. Stone of Sisyphus
05. Night and Day
06. Christmas Album
07. Chicago XXX

Posted by Roy on Friday, 04.9.10 @ 11:45am


Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff will be inducted with Chicago the same way Sammy Hagar was inducted with Van Halen!

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:16pm


Consider it this way: Peter Cetera is David Lee Roth. Jason Scheff is Sammy Hagar.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:19pm


Champlin and Scheff has nothing to do with Chicago's body of work during their prolific years from 1969-1977 and these era is the ONLY reason why we are still talking about them.


Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:27pm


Champlin and Scheff have nothing to do with Chicago's body of work during their prolific years from 1969-1977 and this era is the ONLY reason why we are still talking about them.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:28pm


People are still talking about Chicago not because of the songs "All Roads Lead To You" or "Look Away" but because of their body of work from the late 60's to the 70's.

People want Chicago to be inducted not because of the song "Bigger Than Elvis" or the album "XXX" but because of the album "CTA", "Chicago II" or the song "Beginnings" or "Saturday In The Park."

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:33pm


As I explained above, Champlin and Scheff does not deserve to be included if ever Chicago is inducted.

Only the original seven plus Guercio should be inducted as Chicago.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:50pm


As I explained above, Champlin and Scheff do not deserve to be included if ever Chicago is inducted.

Only the original seven plus Guercio should be inducted as Chicago.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 04.10.10 @ 14:50pm


Chicago songs written by Bill Champlin

01. Sonny Think Twice
02. Daddy's Favorite Fool
03. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
04. Remember the Feeling
05. Please Hold On
06. It's Alright
07. I Believe
08. Come In From the Night
09. Runaround
10. Somebody, Somewhere
11. Who Do You Love
12. Holdin On
13. Hearts In Trouble
14. Plaid
15. Cry For the Lost
16. The Show Must Go On
17. Bethlehem
18. Why Can't We
19. Where Were You
20. Already Gone
21. Better

Chicago songs written by Jason Scheff

01. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
02. We Can Last Forever
03. What Kind of Man Would I Be
04. Runaround
05. If It Were You
06. What Does It Take
07. God Save the Queen
08. Man to Woman
09. Bigger Than Elvis
10. Mah Jongg
11. Let's Take A Lifetime
12. The Pull
13. King of Might Have Been
14. Caroline
15. Why Can't We
16. Love Will Come Back
17. Long Lost Friend
18. 90 Degrees and Freezing
19. Where Were You

That's your opinion, but it's not going to happen! Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff were talked about, interviewed and the songs they sang for Chicago were featured on VH1 Behind the Music - Chicago. It would look really odd if Chicago was inducted without Champlin and Scheff but they get mentioned in the video biography at the Rock Hall induction ceremony.

Chicago hits performed by Bill Champlin:

01. Hard Habit To Break (with Peter Cetera) TOP 5
02. Will You Still Love Me (with Jason Scheff) TOP 5
03. Look Away (# 1 HIT)
04. I Don't Wanna Live Without Your Love
05. You're Not Alone
06. Hearts In Trouble
07. Here In My Heart

Chicago Hits performed by Jason Scheff

01. Will You Still Love Me (with Bill Champlin) TOP 5
02. What Kind of Man Would I Be (TOP 5)
03. We Can Last Forever
04. Niagara Falls
05. If She Would Have Been Faithful
06. 25 Or 6 To 4 (Remake)
07. All Roads Lead To You
08. Show Me Sign
09. Love Will Come Back

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.11.10 @ 10:10am


THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES (12)

Walter Parazaider
Lee Loughnane
James Pankow
Danny Seraphine
Robert Lamm
Terry Kath
Peter Cetera
Laudir De Oliveira
Donnie Dacus
Bill Champlin
Jason Scheff
Tris Imboden

Chicago will join The Grateful Dead (12) and Parliament Funkadelic (16) as the only groups with more than 9 members each, inducted!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.11.10 @ 10:19am


Chicago became a supergroup when Bill Champlin of Sons of Champlin joined them. The Rock Hall eats that kind of stuff up. You could say the same about when Laudir De Oliveira of Sergio Mendes joined Chicago even before Champlin. The Rock Hall likes inducting supergroups: Cream, Yardbirds, Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills and Nash. If they inducted Terry Sylvester with The Hollies, I'm pretty sure they will induct Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff with Chicago. You'll be sure to see the Beatles, The Rolling Stones, the Beach Boys, the Bee-Gees, the Grateful Dead, Sons of Champlin, Sergio Mendes, Miles Davis, Blood, Sweat & Tears, Earth, Wind & Fire, Electric Flag, Tower of Power, Ten Wheel Drive, and Ides of March mentioned somewhere in Chicago's Rock Hall biography.

Posted by QAZ on Wednesday, 04.14.10 @ 08:21am


DANNY SERAPHINE

Drummer/producer Daniel Seraphine was born in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28, 1948, and was raised in Little Italy. He has said that his interest in music probably saved him from becoming a street thug.

We were brash enough to say, well let's be the Beatles with horns.

-Walter Parazaider

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 04.14.10 @ 08:47am


Who the Hell is Bill Champlin?!

Posted by Paul in KY on Wednesday, 04.14.10 @ 12:28pm


Just ask Roy. He'll copy/paste a bio for you. Just don't expect any context and/or opinion.

Posted by Big Willie on Wednesday, 04.14.10 @ 13:56pm


Thinking about it, the first Jazz-Rock was done by The Doors on the album The Soft Parade, so technically Chicago weren't that innovative.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 04.15.10 @ 19:39pm


The only reason why people are still discussing or talking about Chicago is because of their late 60's and 70's albums and singles.

Longevity does not guarantee induction.

When Champlin and Scheff joined Chicago, the band became a cover band or a "karaoke" band.

The original lineup of Chicago is the only reason why people want them to be inducted in the R&R Hall Of Fame.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 01:37am


Chicago has a chance for to be inducted to the R&R Hall Of Fame because of "Chicago Transit Authority", "Chicago II", "Chicago III", "Saturday In The Park" or "Chicago VII" and not because of "Will You Still Love Me" or "Look Away".

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 01:40am


Chicago's chances for induction in the R&R Hall Of Fame rest on the body of work from the late 60's and the 70's such as "Chicago Transit Authority", "Chicago II", "Chicago III", "Saturday In The Park" or "Chicago VII" and not because of "Will You Still Love Me" or "Look Away".
We have to face the reality that when Champlin and Scheff joined the band they became uncool.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 01:43am


I agree with you AudiophilePhil, but Champlin and Scheff will be inducted with the original members of Chicago whether you like it or not.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 09:24am


Champlin and Scheff don't deserve to be inducted if ever the original Chicago lineup is inducted to the R&R Hall of Fame.

They have 'zero' contribution in Chicago's real legacy and body of work from the late 60's and the 70's. The body of work Chicago has made during the Terry Kath years (1969-1977) is more than enough to put the band in the R&R Hall of Fame. Actually it would have been bettter if they disbanded right afte Terrys's death. Continuing as a 'karaoke' band only harmed their reputation and their chances for induction.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 04.19.10 @ 11:45am


Timothy B. Schmidt was only with the Eagles for 17 years (1980-1997) when The Eagles were inducted in into the Rock Hall in 1997. He sang one of the Eagles biggest hits: I Can't Tell You Why. Love Will Keep Us Alive (1994).

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 12:05pm


http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0345899/bio

James William Guercio managed and produced The Buckinghams, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Chicago. He also directed and produced the 70's movie Electra Glide In Blue, which featured members of Chicago. Guercio would be inducted in the non-performers category or sidemen category. He plays guitar and horns as well.

Date of Birth
18 July 1945, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Mini Biography

James William Guercio is the chief executive of The Caribou Companies in Boulder, Colorado of which Caribou Films is an entity. Guercio produced and directed "Electra Glide in Blue," the American entry in the 1973 Cannes Film Festival, and in 1979, produced "Second Hand Hearts," directed by Hal Ashby. He was the original director for "Tom Horn" starring Steve McQueen in 1979.

As a guitarist, bass player, arranger and composer, Guercio, started in the music business with Dick Clark in 1962. Touring and performing with Gene Pitney, Brian Hyland, Del Shannon, Chuck Berry, Bobby Darin and Chad and Jeremy. He was an original guitarist with Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention along with producing, arranging, and composing numerous hits for Chad and Jeremy and the Buckinghams. Guercio also won two Grammy Awards for his work as a music producer. His legendary Caribou Ranch studio recorded artists including Chicago, Phil Collins, Earth, Wind and Fire, Amy Grant, Billy Joel, Elton John, Carole King, John Lennon, The Beach Boys, Supertramp, and U2.

He has 36 Grammy nominations, winning Album of the Year in 1969 for Blood, Sweat, and Tears along with a Grammy for his work with Chicago. He produced numerous works by Blood, Sweat, and Tears, Chicago, and the Beach Boys.

In 1986, Guercio purchased and became the primary shareholder of Country Music Television which was sold to Gaylord/Westinghouse in 1991. He has been married to Lucy Angle Guercio for 35 years and has three children.

IMDb Mini Biography

Trivia
Used to manage the rock band Chicago.

Winner of Grammy Awards for: "Blood, Sweat and Tears" (Album of the Year / co-producer / performing artist: Blood Sweat & Tears) (1969); "If You Leave Me Now" (Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) / performing artist: Chicago) (1976).

Worked with band member Lew Soloff of Blood Sweat & Tears.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 12:16pm


How many bands can you name that had a major hit being sung by a member who was not an original member of the group and when the group was inducted, the singer who sung the major hit wasn't included as an inductee?

Laudir De Oliveira, Bill Champlin, and Jason Scheff will definetly be inducted with Chicago.

THOSE INDUCTED:

01. Timothy B. Schmidt: Inducted with the Eagles in 1997. He was with the Eagles for only 17 years when they were inducted. He sang the Eagles hit, "I Can't Tell You Why" from 1980 and "Love Will Keep Us Alive" from 1994.

02. Sammy Hagar: Inducted with Van Halen in 2007. He was with Van Halen for 22 years when they got inducted. He sang many of Van Halen's hits.

WILL THEY BE INDUCTED?-YES!:

01. J.T. Taylor: Kool & the Gang first charted in 1969. J.T. Taylor joined the group in 1978 and sang lead on all the groups hits from that point on, which included Celebration, Too Hot, Get Down On It, Cherish, Joanna and others. It's been over 25 years since he joined the group.

02. J.D. Nicholas: After Lionel Richie left the Commodores in 1981, The Commodores released 3 more studio albums between 1983 and 1987 and they scored 8 more hits with drummer Walter Clyde Orange singing lead along with Lionel Richie's replacement J.D. Nicholas. Their biggest hit was "Nightshift" in 1985. J.D. Nicholas was from the group Heatwave. Nicholas was with the Commodores for 5 years and then they stopped producing albums.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 14:32pm


Judging Jason Scheff based on how he sings the Peter Cetera songs in concert is unfair because he is not Peter Cetera. Judge Jason Scheff for how he sings his own material with Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 09:42am


Bill Champlin and Jason Scheff were talked about, interviewed and the songs they sang for Chicago were featured on VH1 Behind the Music - Chicago. It would look really odd if Chicago was inducted without Champlin and Scheff but they get mentioned in the video biography at the Rock Hall induction ceremony and in Chicago's Rock Hall biography online. When you tell a story you can't leave out any parts. Bill Champlin joining Chicago and Jason Scheff replacing Peter Cetera were pivotal points. Plus, Bill Champlin was with Sons of Champlin and he also wrote songs for other artists and won grammys for them. The Rock Hall eats that stuff up. (a supergroup sort of thing). Champlin and Scheff will be inducted.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 09:52am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO WILL BE POSTED TOMORROW!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 10:17am


Would the band be upset if the person who is chosen to give the induction speech for Chicago decides to talk about everything and leaving nothing out: the good, the bad and the ugly? No sugarcoating, because this is Rock and Roll mthrfckrs! A real diehard fan.

EXAMPLES:

01. Talking about the Chicago logo, the album covers, numbering the albums instead of giving them names, the whole democracy/group as a whole thing and defending those decisions.

02. Talking about what critics have said about Chicago.

03. Talking about how Terry Kath died.

04. Talking about how and why Peter Cetera left Chicago and how Peter wanted a Phil Collins/Genesis relationship, but the band and the record company wouldn't have that.

05. Talking about the circumstances surrounding Danny Seraphine's departure from Chicago.

06. Talking about the cheesy 80s love balladry.

07. Talking about Chicago's early management and record company executives and how they forced Chicago to change their music style.

08. Saying its about fckng time!

Posted by RAKER on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 11:59am


Chicago blows!

Posted by Chemical ALI on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 12:02pm


Yea, they use horns.

Posted by Lepre_Khan on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 12:03pm


No, they just suck.

Posted by Chemical ALI on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 12:04pm


RAKER, you read my mind!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 13:06pm


If ever Chicago is inducted to the Rock "N Roll Hall Of Fame , it's just becyase of their body of work from 1969-1977 nothing more nothing less.

Only the original seven plus Guercio and Laudir de Oliveira will be inducted.

I miss the original Chicago. Please YouTube video below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-LoRtUB510&feature=related

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 01:13am


If ever Chicago is inducted to the Rock 'N Roll Hall Of Fame , it's just because of their body of work from 1969-1977, nothing more nothing less.

Only the original seven plus Guercio and maybe Laudir de Oliveira will be inducted.

I miss the original Chicago. Please see the YouTube video below showing Terry Kath on lead guitar and lead vocals.

He smokes Stevie Ray Vaughan and Eric Clapton in both guitar playing and vocals.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-LoRtUB510&feature=related

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 01:17am


Hey Roy, you forgot guitarist Mick Taylor, a later member of the Rolling Stones. He was inducted too!

Posted by Asif on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 10:36am


Am I missing something here? When I read that Chicago was NOT in the RRHOF I thought I had bad information. But I looked it up and it’s true. Now I will grant you, the band they eventually became is a shadow of what they started out as,churning out some pretty sappy AM crap culminating in the pussy ballad “If You Leave Me Now”. But their first five or six albums fused rock and jazz in a way never heard before. I know Blood, Sweat & Tears did it before them but they just didn’t have staying power. Chicago’s early records were a staple of airplay in the late sixties and early seventies on free form FM radio. They eventually became a veritable hit machine. Billboard cites them as the second most successful American band after the Beach Boys. I admit that their best music was at the beginning of their career and if you drew a chart of their rock quotient, it would probably be a straight line down. Still they have longevity and success. I think they should be in.

Posted by Baba Booey on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 13:51pm


Chicago Studio Albums with Original Material:

01. 1969 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 Chicago II
03. 1971 Chicago III
04. 1972 Chicago V
05. 1973 Chicago VI
06. 1974 Chicago VII
07. 1975 Chicago VIII
08. 1976 Chicago X
09. 1977 Chicago XI
10. 1978 Hot Streets
11. 1979 Chicago 13
12. 1980 Chicago XIV
13. 1982 Chicago 16
14. 1984 Chicago 17
15. 1987 Chicago 18
16. 1988 Chicago 19
17. 1991 Twenty 1
18. 2006 Chicago XXX
19. 2008 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 15:08pm


The Billboard Top 200 Albums Chart

Chicago

01. 1969 - # 17 Chicago Transit Authority
02. 1970 - # 4 Chicago II
03. 1971 - # 2 Chicago III
04. 1972 - # 3 Chicago at Carnegie Hall
05. 1972 - # 1 Chicago V
06. 1973 - # 1 Chicago VI
07. 1974 - # 1 Chicago VII
08. 1975 - # 1 Chicago VIII
09. 1975 - # 1 Chicago IX: Greatest Hits
10. 1976 - # 3 Chicago X
11. 1977 - # 6 Chicago XI
12. 1978 - # 12 Hot Streets
13. 1979 - # 21 Chicago 13
14. 1980 - # 71 Chicago XIV
15. 1981 - # 171 Greatest Hits: Volume II
16. 1982 - # 9 Chicago 16
17. 1984 - # 4 Chicago 17
18. 1987 - # 35 Chicago 18
19. 1988 - # 37 Chicago 19
20. 1989 - # 37 Greatest Hits: 1982-1989
21. 1991 - # 66 Twenty 1
22. 1995 - # 90 Night and Day
23. 1997 - # 55 The Heart of Chicago 1967-1997
24. 1998 - # 154 The Heart of Chicago II 1967-1998
25. 1998 - # 47 Chicago's First Christmas
26. 2002 - # 38 The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning
27. 2003 - # 116 Christmas: What's It Gonna Be Santa?
28. 2005 - # 57 Love Songs
29. 2006 - # 41 Chicago XXX
30. 2007 - # 100 The Best of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition
31. 2008 - #122 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 04.28.10 @ 15:13pm


THE SONS OF CHAMPLIN (1966-1977)

Bill Champlin
Geoffrey Palmer
Bill Bowen
Terry Haggerty
David Schallock
Al Strong
James Preston

One of the last and more obscure bands to emerge from the late-'60s San Francisco psychedelic scene, the Sons of Champlin were relatively unusual among Bay Area bands for favoring heavily soul-influenced material and employing a prominent horn section. Their more introspective songs can recall the more subdued efforts of Quicksilver Messenger Service and Moby Grape, and their longer compositions boasted unusually complex song structures and tempo shifts. Revered by some collectors, their work hasn't aged as well as the best of their peers; the vocals weren't gritty enough to carry the R&B-based material and the ambitious longer tracks were prone to some half-baked songwriting and meandering jamming. Their first three albums (issued on Capitol between 1969 and 1971) are considered their best, though they recorded some other LPs in the '70s with shifting personnel. In late 1997, the Sons of Champlin reunited for a series of hometown reunion concerts, resulting in the release of their first-ever live LP a year later.

THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. 1969 - 137 Loosen Up Naturally
02. 1969 - 171 The Sons
03. 1973 - 186 Welcome To The Dance
04. 1976 - 117 A Circle Filled With Love
05. 1977 - 188 Loving Is Why

THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1976 - 47 Hold On
02. 1977 - 80 Here Is Where Your Love Belongs

BILL CHAMPLIN

Singer/songwriter/keyboard player/guitarist Bill Champlin has been a rock journeyman in a career dating back to the 1960s. Starting in 1966, Champlin was the pivotal figure in a San Francisco-based group called the Sons of Champlin that existed and made records off and on for over a decade without gaining a great deal of notice. In 1981, Champlin became a member of Chicago, with whom he has recorded and toured ever since, while releasing the occasional solo album, sometimes only in Japan. He scored two singles chart entries in 1982 with "Tonight Tonight" and "Sara," duetted with Patti LaBelle on "The Last Unbroken Heart" from the soundtrack to the TV series Miami Vice in 1987, and sang with Brenda Russell on jazz saxophonist Tom Scott's Keep This Love Alive album in 1991.

THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. 1982 - 178 Runaway

THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1982 - 61 Sara
02. 1982 - 55 Tonight Tonight

GRAMMYS

1979 After the Love Has Gone - Best R&B Song
1982 Turn Your Love Around - Best R&B Song

Bill Champlin wrote After The Love Has Gone for Earth, Wind & Fire and Turn Your Love Around for George Benson. Bill Champlin also sang the theme for the TV show In the Heat of the Night.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 04.29.10 @ 08:38am


What did Patti Smith or the Dave Clark Five do that is better than 25 or 6-2-4 or Beginnings? Glad All Over? Excuse me? Chicago should have been inducted its first year. Right now this site shows them as 9% chance of induction. Every year Chicago isn't inducted, the credibility of the R&RHOF goes down.

Posted by Indy Steve on Saturday, 05.1.10 @ 22:23pm


The Dave Clark Five were part of the original "British Invasion", were giving the Beatles a run for their money for a bit popularity-wise, and at the time were considered better than the Stones (anyone who says otherwise obviously wasn't alive during that time).

Now, will someone tell me how Chicago was so influential and innovative (DC Five also had a sax player...FYI)...???

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 08:54am


Have any of you ever noticed the similarities between Dionne Warwick's 1964 hit, "Walk On By" and Chicago's 1988 hit, "Look Away"? Walk On By was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Look Away was written by Diane Warren.


Walk On By

If you see me walking down the street
And I start to cry each time we meet
Walk on by, walk on by
Make believe that you don't see the tears
Just let me grieve in private
Cause each time I see you
I break down and cry
Walk on by, walk on by


Look Away

If you see me walking by
And the tears are in my eyes
Look away, baby look away
If we meet on the street someday
and I don't know what to say
Look away, baby look away
Don't look at me
I don't want you to see me this way

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 14:09pm


Now, will someone tell me how Chicago was so influential and innovative???

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 08:54am


It's really too late for that! Chicago belongs in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame period and this is why:

THE TOP 4 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON BILLBOARD

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

THAT SAYS IT ALL RIGHT THERE!

My Rock Hall speech for Chicago is coming soon!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 14:17pm


Per the criteria set forth by the Hall of Fame...THAT is no reason to induct them. Once again, what innovation and influence did they have? From my vantage point (having grown up in their heyday, I might add) they were just kinda THERE, know what I mean...????

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 14:26pm


Yep. As I pointed out (though everyone conveniently chose to overlook it), The Doors were actually the first to do Jazz-Rock on the "Soft Parade" album (you know, like that song "Touch Me" that gets heavy play on classic rock radio.) So, technically, neither Chicago or Blood, Sweat & Tears can be given credit for innovation. Gitarzan's defense of DC5 seemed reasonable, and... Since I haven't really listened to Patti Smith I can't defend that choice knowledgeably, but she apparently has had an influence on some of the punk that's followed and was one of the first CBGB performers. My guess would be that some of the female Punks that followed her were influenced by her, and she was an inspiration to a little band called R.E.M. (you may have heard of them.) However, even as one of her biggest critics, Dameon pointed out way up above on this page that she is now in so there's no point in discussing her. If you really did have a strong argument you wouldn't need to bring inducted artists into the discussion. I know I don't need to.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 20:20pm


An email I received from the president of the Rock Hall museum Terry Stewart; a nominating and voting committee member in regards to my question about how they determine which members of a band is inducted:

Once an artist (group) is selected for induction, a separate committee oversees who is inducted in the group. Relevant factors are who started the group and who played on the songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group. To speculate about this relative to Chicago at this point is just not possible.

Terry Stewart
President

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 05.4.10 @ 08:52am


Well that might be what's keeping them out. If they're having trouble with it they just should induct the original lineup, right? That might be what's stopping them from even nominating Deep Purple, because I know they've got every bit of criteria down.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 05.4.10 @ 21:20pm


"Once an artist (group) is selected for induction, a separate committee oversees who is inducted in the group. Relevant factors are who started the group and who played on the songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group. To speculate about this relative to Chicago at this point is just not possible."

1. Who started Chicago?

Danny Seraphine
Walter Parazaider
Terry Kath
Lee Loughnane
James Pankow
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera

2. What songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group?

"25 Or 6 To 4"
"Make Me Smile"
"Beginnings"
"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?"
"Saturday In The Park"
"Questions 67 & 68"
"I'm A Man"
"Feelin' Stronger Everyday"
"If You Leave Me Now"
"Old Days"
"(I've Been) Searchin' So Long"
"Call On Me"
"Wishing You Were Here"
"Dialogue Part 1 and Part 2"
"Free"
"Just You 'N Me"

3. Who played on these songs?

Robert Lamm (keyboards, vocals, songwriter)
James Pankow (trombone, songwriting)
Terry Kath (guitar, vocals)
Peter Cetera (bass, vocals, songwriting)
Danny Seraphone (drums)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, songwriting)
Walt Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)

and

Laudir de Oliceira (percussions)

4. Recognition should also given to their original producer:

James William Guercio

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 12:41pm


What members of Chicago should be inducted?

This is very easy to figure out. I've been pointing this out several times in all my previous posts.

"Once an artist (group) is selected for induction, a separate committee oversees who is inducted in the group. Relevant factors are who started the group and who played on the songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group.


1. Who started Chicago?

Danny Seraphine
Walter Parazaider
Terry Kath
Lee Loughnane
James Pankow
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera

2. What songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group?

"25 Or 6 To 4"
"Make Me Smile"
"Beginnings"
"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?"
"Saturday In The Park"
"Questions 67 & 68"
"I'm A Man"
"Feelin' Stronger Everyday"
"If You Leave Me Now"
"Old Days"
"(I've Been) Searchin' So Long"
"Call On Me"
"Wishing You Were Here"
"Dialogue Part 1 and Part 2"
"Free"
"Just You 'N Me"

3. Who played on these songs?

Robert Lamm (keyboards, vocals, songwriter)
James Pankow (trombone, songwriting)
Terry Kath (guitar, vocals)
Peter Cetera (bass, vocals, songwriting)
Danny Seraphone (drums)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, songwriting)
Walt Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)

and

Laudir de Oliceira (percussions)

4. Recognition should also given to their original producer:

James William Guercio

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 12:46pm


Correction

Oliveira not Oliceira

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 12:49pm


5. What albums that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group?

"Chicago Transit Authority" (1969)
"Chicago" (1970) aka "Chicago II"
"Chicago III" (1971)
"Chicago V" (1972)
"Chicago VII" (1974)
"Chicago IX - Greatest Hits" (1975)
"Chicago At Carnegie Hall" (1971)
"Chicago VI" (1973)
"Chicago XI" (1977)
"Chicago X" (1976)
"Chicago VIII" (1975)

The first album "Chicago Transit Authority" is included in the two books that list albums that everyone should hear before he or she dies.
It is also among the top selling albums from the 60's with at least 2 million copies.

All of the albums I listed above (first eleven albums) went platinum in the Billboard album chart. All of these albums featured the late great Terry Kath with his very innovative guitar playing.

They had five (5) consecutive No. 1 albums on the Billboard chart from 1972 to 1975. These albums are:

"Chicago V" (1972)
"Chicago VI" (1973)
"Chicago VII" (1974)
"Chicago VIII" (1975)
"Chicago IX - Greatest Hits" (1975)

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 13:13pm


If You Leave Me Now was voted the # 19 Greatest Love Song on VH1's 100 Greatest Love Songs, and Blender/VH1 voted You're the Inspiration as the # 19 worst song ever written. Both songs written by Peter Cetera.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 14:36pm


"You're the Inspiration" is pretty wimpy I must say.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 21:57pm


"My Rock Hall speech for Chicago is coming soon!"

Those wimpy Chicago ballads in the 80's and 90's should not be mentioned at all when trying to convince the Hall of Fame committee to induct them.
Those post Terry Kath ballads (80's, 90's, 2000's)have tarnished the legacy of the original band and kept them from being inducted.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Thursday, 05.6.10 @ 23:53pm


Chicago

Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: trumpet; songwriter)
James Pankow (1967-Present: trombone; songwriter)
Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)

Other Members

Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: guitar)
Chris Pinnick (1980-1984: guitar)
Bill Champlin (1981-present: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
Dawayne Bailey (1986-1994: guitar)
Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)
Keith Howland (1995-present: guitar)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.7.10 @ 13:47pm


Question #6. What were the years when Chicago created their most important legacy?

Answer: 1969-1977

Question #7. Who were the members of Chicago from their most important years as a group 1969-1977?

Danny Seraphine (drums, songwriter)
Walter Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)
Terry Kath (guitar, main vocals, songwriter)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, flugelhorn,songwriter, vocals)
James Pankow (trombone,vocals)
Robert Lamm (keyboards, main vocals, songwriter)
Peter Cetera (bass, main vocals, songwriter)

and

Laudir de Oliveira (percussions)

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Saturday, 05.8.10 @ 01:29am


FROM BLENDER MAGAZINE

The 50 Worst Songs Ever! Watch, Listen and Cringe!

18. CHICAGO “You’re the Inspiration” 1984
And you thought the Cubs were the biggest losers in this town? Wrong!

It’s hard to believe, but at one point Chicago were a fairly well-respected rock band. Then Peter Cetera joined, and they jettisoned any remaining street cred in favor of soft-rock ballads your grandmother would deem harmless. In this, their most egregious offense, Cetera’s gratingly affected and overmodulated vocals float over 1984 standard-issue electric piano, and a nation of greasy, awkward seventh graders slow-danced for the very first time. Worst Moment: That power-rock drum fill before the second verse, apparently designed to mollify hatas who thought the band had lost its edge.

Blender's The 25 Biggest Wusses … Ever!

5.6 21. Peter Cetera
5 Along Comes a Woman
Peter Cetera
It’s not as though Chicago were exactly hardcore thugs before he became their focal point, but under Cetera’s dictatorship they purged their jazzier impulses to concentrate full-bore on self-pitying schmaltz like “If You Leave Me Now” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry.” That was merely a warm-up for a solo career so flaccid that on his Amy Grant duet, “The Next Time I Fall,” the milquetoast Christian pop balladeer sounds tough by comparison. Wussiest moment: His unconvincing stab at chivalry, “Glory of Love,” actually felt too mawkish for The Karate Kid Part II.

5 Along Comes a Woman
Peter Cetera
It’s not as though Chicago were exactly hardcore thugs before he became their focal point, but under Cetera’s dictatorship they purged their jazzier impulses to concentrate full-bore on self-pitying schmaltz like “If You Leave Me Now” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry.” That was merely a warm-up for a solo career so flaccid that on his Amy Grant duet, “The Next Time I Fall,” the milquetoast Christian pop balladeer sounds tough by comparison. Wussiest moment: His unconvincing stab at chivalry, “Glory of Love,” actually felt too mawkish for The Karate Kid Part II.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.9.10 @ 13:04pm


That writer is misinformed.

Peter Cetera was already with Chicago starting with their very first album "The Chicago Transit Authority" (1969).

He was an underappreciated melodic bass player and has a very distinctive soaring tenor voice that's more suited to rock numbers than ballads.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Sunday, 05.9.10 @ 18:30pm


"You're The Inspiration" (1984) and "Along Comes A Woman" (1984) are two Cetera songs that were written and recorded when Chicago was already over the hill or past their prime.

Their prime was in the late 60's and the 70's.

If you really want Chicago to be inducted in the R&R Hall of Fame, you should only mention their real legacy from the late 60's to the 70's.
Mentioning their 80's output without Terry Kath as guitarist and Guercio as producer is useless.

Mentioning the later members (1982-present) would not help them get inducted and would even harm their real legacy because these later members were not with the group when Chicago was in its prime from 1969-1977.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Sunday, 05.9.10 @ 18:45pm


Chicago's real legacy from the late 60's to the 70's is more than enough to qualify them for induction into the R&R Hall of Fame.

What the new members (1982-present)have done is to transform Chicago into a "karaoke" band.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Sunday, 05.9.10 @ 19:03pm


FLUTE ROCK

01. Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull)
02. Peter Gabriel (Genesis)
03. Walter Parazaider (Chicago)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 06:23am


Street Player: My Chicago Story [Hardcover]
Danny Seraphine (Author)

The inside story of Chicago, one of the most successful and enduring rock bands ever
With their distinctive blending of soulful rock with horn-infused urban jazz, Chicago has thrilled music fans for more than forty years with their lyrical brilliance. In this no-holds-barred memoir, legendary rocker Danny Seraphine shares his dramatic—and often shocking—experiences as the popular superband's cofounder and longtime drummer. He reveals behind-the-scenes anecdotes about Chicago's beginnings as the house band at Los Angeles's legendary Whisky A Go Go, where they were discovered by music icons Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix, and personal insights about the group’s many comebacks and reinventions over the years. Offers a lively inside account of the music and history of the perennially popular band Chicago, one of the most successful American bands ever with over 122 million albums sold, by its cofounder and longtime drummer Danny Seraphine
Includes riveting tales from Seraphine's time on the road touring with performers including Dennis and Carl Wilson of the Beach Boys, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Bruce Springsteen, as well as rare photographs. Candidly tackles many rumors about Chicago, including Mafia ties, accounting and payola scandals, and major drug abuse
Discusses the mysterious circumstances surrounding Seraphine's 1990 firing from the band as well as his comeback with his critically acclaimed new band, California Transit Authority. Whether you're a diehard Chicago fan or just love a rock and roll memoir well told, Street Player will entertain and surprise you.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 06:58am


Street Player: My Chicago Story [Hardcover]
Danny Seraphine (Author)

The inside story of Chicago, one of the most successful and enduring rock bands ever. With their distinctive blending of soulful rock with horn-infused urban jazz, Chicago has thrilled music fans for more than forty years with their lyrical brilliance. In this no-holds-barred memoir, legendary rocker Danny Seraphine shares his dramatic—and often shocking—experiences as the popular superband's cofounder and longtime drummer. He reveals behind-the-scenes anecdotes about Chicago's beginnings as the house band at Los Angeles's legendary Whisky A Go Go, where they were discovered by music icons Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix, and personal insights about the group’s many comebacks and reinventions over the years. Offers a lively inside account of the music and history of the perennially popular band Chicago, one of the most successful American bands ever with over 122 million albums sold, by its cofounder and longtime drummer Danny Seraphine
Includes riveting tales from Seraphine's time on the road touring with performers including Dennis and Carl Wilson of the Beach Boys, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Bruce Springsteen, as well as rare photographs. Candidly tackles many rumors about Chicago, including Mafia ties, accounting and payola scandals, and major drug abuse. Discusses the mysterious circumstances surrounding Seraphine's 1990 firing from the band as well as his comeback with his critically acclaimed new band, California Transit Authority. Whether you're a diehard Chicago fan or just love a rock and roll memoir well told, Street Player will entertain and surprise you.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 06:59am


CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO CAN BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: trumpet; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: guitar)
10. Bill Champlin (1981-present: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
11. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 08:38am


CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO CAN BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: trumpet; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: guitar)
10. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
11. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 08:40am


Once Chicago and Bernie Taupin are inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, you will never hear from me again!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 08:45am


What members of Chicago should be inducted?

This is very easy to figure out. I've been pointing this out several times in all my previous posts.

"Once an artist (group) is selected for induction, a separate committee oversees who is inducted in the group. Relevant factors are who started the group and who played on the songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group.


Question #1. Who started Chicago?

Danny Seraphine
Walter Parazaider
Terry Kath
Lee Loughnane
James Pankow
Robert Lamm
Peter Cetera

Question #2. What songs that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group?

"25 Or 6 To 4"
"Make Me Smile"
"Beginnings"
"Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?"
"Saturday In The Park"
"Questions 67 & 68"
"I'm A Man"
"Feelin' Stronger Everyday"
"If You Leave Me Now"
"Old Days"
"(I've Been) Searchin' So Long"
"Call On Me"
"Wishing You Were Here"
"Dialogue Part 1 and Part 2"
"Free"
"Just You 'N Me"

Question #3. Who played on these songs?

Robert Lamm (keyboards, vocals, songwriter)
James Pankow (trombone, songwriting)
Terry Kath (guitar, vocals)
Peter Cetera (bass, vocals, songwriting)
Danny Seraphone (drums)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, songwriting)
Walt Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)

and

Laudir de Oliveira (percussions)

Question #4. Recognition should also be given to their original producer:

James William Guercio

Question #5. What albums that had the greatest impact and created the legacy of that group?

"Chicago Transit Authority" (1969)
"Chicago" (1970) aka "Chicago II"
"Chicago III" (1971)
"Chicago V" (1972)
"Chicago VII" (1974)
"Chicago IX - Greatest Hits" (1975)
"Chicago At Carnegie Hall" (1971)
"Chicago VI" (1973)
"Chicago XI" (1977)
"Chicago X" (1976)
"Chicago VIII" (1975)

The first album "Chicago Transit Authority" is included in the two books that list albums that everyone should hear before he or she dies.
It is also among the top selling albums from the 60's with at least 2 million copies.

All of the albums I listed above (first eleven albums) went platinum in the Billboard album chart. All of these albums featured the late great Terry Kath with his very innovative guitar playing.

They had five (5) consecutive No. 1 albums on the Billboard chart from 1972 to 1975. These albums are:

"Chicago V" (1972)
"Chicago VI" (1973)
"Chicago VII" (1974)
"Chicago VIII" (1975)
"Chicago IX - Greatest Hits" (1975)

Question #6. What were the years when Chicago created their most important legacy?

Answer: 1969-1977

Question #7. Who were the members of Chicago from their most important years as a group 1969-1977?

Danny Seraphine (drums, songwriter)
Walter Parazaider (woodwinds, flute)
Terry Kath (guitar, main vocals, songwriter)
Lee Loughnane (trumpet, flugelhorn,songwriter, vocals)
James Pankow (trombone,vocals)
Robert Lamm (keyboards, main vocals, songwriter)
Peter Cetera (bass, main vocals, songwriter)

and

Laudir de Oliveira (percussions)

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 09:45am


I am going to have to agree with AudiophilePhil on the whole who should be included if Chicago ever gets inducted. The one thing that Roy has going for him is the recent example of Metallica. They included everyone that ever recorded on an album. This included their newest bass player, Robert Trujillo, who joined the band in 2003 and only played on their newest album 'Death Magnetic'.

Posted by Gassman on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 10:41am


The DC5 used studio musicians or session players in most of their studio recordings.

On the other hand, Chicago's members all played their own instruments in the studio without any help from session or outside musicians. They also sang their vocal parts without any help from guest vocalists.

So, tell me who deserves to be inducted to the R&R Hall of Fame, Chicago or DC5?

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 14:28pm


Why don't you name these "studio musicians" that the Dave Clark Five used and what songs they were used on (also, back it up with proof). I can't say that I ever heard that about them. In Chicago's case, they've had such a revolving door of musicians it's hard to tell who was actually a member and who was a "sub".

Quit comparing and downgrading other artists to bolster Chicago...if they can't stand on their own merits, then they probably won't get inducted, anyway (which, at this point in time, seems to be the case)...

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 20:22pm


I agree with Gitarzan... try and just talk about Chicago, and you'll be taken more seriously.

Posted by Sam on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 21:54pm


I am new to the forum.. I love Chicago an DC5 who cares who played on their stuff it sounds great!the more musicans the better....

Posted by X15 on Monday, 05.10.10 @ 22:02pm


Tarzan, you are ignorant about Chicago. From 1969-1973, they only had seven members.

Their personnel remained intact from 1969-1977 until Terry Kath's death in early 1978. In this regard, they were like the Beatles with a horn section.

The only change in their lineup was the addition of the Brazilian percussionist in late 1974 and he eventually became a full-time member.

Where did you get the idea that they were using sub? If you referring to the current incarnation of Chicago that became a 'karaoke' band, you are right.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Tuesday, 05.11.10 @ 10:41am


Ignorant????? I'd rather be ignorant than clueless!!! As far as I'm concerned the essence of Chicago...their heart and soul...died with Terry Kath (who, by the way, was one of my favorite players). Since then, their music for the most part has been so syrupy that it'll make your teeth rot listening to it, and let's face it, their line-up has been a revolving door for a number of years. they still tour, year after year, trying to pawn themselves off as "Chicago", where in reality they are a caricature of what they once were. they're as bad as the Beach Boys, and every time they walk on stage now they further tarnish their legacy, To that band Terry Kath was irreplacable...period.

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 05.11.10 @ 18:58pm


So we both agree that Chicago's heart and soul died when Terry Kath died in 1978.
Terry Kath has remained as one of my favourite guitarists and vocalists of all time and the Terry Kath-era Chicago was one of my favourite bands of the rock era.
There's no disagreement here as we both like the original band.
I have to tell you also that I hate the current Chicago and I agree with you that the new lineup has tarnished the band's legacy from 1969-1977.

In my previous posts, I was pointing out that if ever they will be inducted in the R&R Hall of Fame, only the seven original members deserve to be inducted plus the original producer Guercio and theor percussionist Laudir de Oliveira.

What I don't understand is why you are telling Roy that Chicago does not deserve to be inducted.

Are you referring to the original Terry Kath-era Chicago or the current 'karaoke' version of the band?

IMHO, the Terry Kath-era Chicago deserve to be in the R&R Hall of Fame.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Wednesday, 05.12.10 @ 03:32am


I agree with Gitarzan's comments up above regarding Terry Kath. The band should have broken up when he died, IMO.

Posted by Paul in KY on Wednesday, 05.12.10 @ 05:56am


We're on the same page Tarzan and Paul.
Chicago should have disbanded after Terry Kath's death in 1978 and therefore preserved their legacy.

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Wednesday, 05.12.10 @ 10:45am


CHICAGO MUSIC VIDEOS (1982-1990)

01. Love Me Tomorrow
02. Hard To Say I'm Sorry
03. Hard Habit To Break
04. You're The Inspiration
05. Along Comes A Woman
06. Stay The Night
07. 25 Or 6 To 4 (Remake)
08. Will You Still Love Me
09. Niagara Falls
10. I Don't Wanna Live Without Your Love
11. Look Away
12. You're Not Alone
13. Chasing The Wind
14. Explain It To My Heart
15. Hearts In Trouble

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.13.10 @ 10:35am


Roy you better stop mentioning any post Terry Kath Chicago videos, albums, or even members. You are just hurting Chicago's chances to be inducted in the R&R Hall Of Fame. You cannot ignore them but they should only be mentioned in passing.

Chicago Music Videos that are worth seeing are those of the original band from the 70's such as "At The Rockies" (1973), "Meanwhile Back At The Ranch" (1974), "Rockin' New Years Eve" (1975) and their concert videos when the original band performed in Germany (1977).

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Wednesday, 05.26.10 @ 17:11pm


I see where AudiophilePhil is coming from simply because of the wimpiness of "Your the Inspiration".

Posted by Sam on Friday, 05.28.10 @ 19:00pm


THERE IS A CONSPIRACY!!

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008, THEN IN 2010 THE CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH, AND THEN, CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (NOVEMBER 2008-JANUARY 2017).

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.
THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.
CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THIS YEAR, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN WILL BECOME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE WILL DO IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN (1984-1990), BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.30.10 @ 13:58pm


Dude, you've really lost it this time.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.30.10 @ 14:00pm


Philip...I'm also expecting an alien invasion, a visitor from the future (I wonder why they haven't come back up to this point), and people to have an intelligent conversation on the Steve Perry and Bon Jovi pages...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 05.30.10 @ 14:12pm


Reading Roy's posts makes Alcoa's stock jump, especially with their newly announced line of fashionable headgear.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 05.30.10 @ 14:16pm


Steve Perry and Bon Jovi ! Yikes!

Posted by AudiophilePhil on Monday, 05.31.10 @ 11:50am


A CHICAGO CONSPIRACY THEORY

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008, THEN IN 2010 THE CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, BUT THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH, AND THEN, CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (NOVEMBER 2008-JANUARY 2017).

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.
THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.
CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THIS YEAR, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN (PRONOUNCED BUFFLIN)WILL BECOME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE WILL DO IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN 1984 AND 1990, BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.31.10 @ 16:45pm


Now you are really losing it. I guess the fate of that entire conspiracy depends on the outcome of the Stanley Cup. And I thought the Backstreet Boys page was bad.

Posted by Sam on Monday, 05.31.10 @ 20:41pm


...And now Peter Cetera will be giving the induction speech and performance for David Foster at the 2010 Songwriters Hall of Fame, the same year that the Chicago Blackhawks will win the Stanley Cup.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.8.10 @ 13:30pm


"Most of what passes today as 'music' is really just 1 note repeated in a synthesized blend of reverberated echo style vocals." - SG

What a load of bollocks. There's some great albums that I've heard from the 2000's that say otherwise. Clearly you're not looking hard enough. Anyway, most of the important music during the 1980s was by artists from the 60s and 70s who were still making albums.


"Actual acoustical musical instruments are virtually unheard on commercial radio." - SG

First, on my local rock radio station there's a cover of "Simple Man" completely acoustic that's played quite often. Second, don't John Mayer and Dave Matthews use plenty of acoustic guitars? Third, mainstream radio is quite often not the best place to find new music.

"Most public schools today don't teach much music education and the ones that do are declining in number at a fairly rapid pace."

It's true that quite a few schools are cutting back on music now, but we're in a recession, so we have to do something. My sister plays saxophone so she's getting plenty of music.

"Thus if a young person was played a song like 'Color My World' they would start convulsing into a state of sensory overload-not knowing how to process this information." - SG

I don't know how you plan to prove that it's true for all of them, and I know plenty of young people who are musically well-adjusted (albeit plenty of them listen to plenty of crap.) As for the artistic integrity thing, thrash metal made a brief splash in the mainstream without catering to trends. Not to mention Alice in Chains, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, R.E.M. U2, Blur, Suede, Oasis, Radiohead, Smashing Pumpkins, New Order (actually an outgrowth of Joy Division) and The Libertines... that's a shortlist of bands who made the jump into the mainstream in either the US or the UK (or both) without sacrificing too much of their initial sound (and in some cases none of their sound), without conforming to public tastes or doing anything they didn't want to do (with the exception of Blur, who kind of started out aping the Mancester scene but then got even bigger and more critical acclaim once they developed their multiple identities.) I understand the sentiment that the charts are in awful shape; in fact, I share it. However, maybe if some of the old people were capable of pulling away from the radio they'd find some great music around them.

"Anyway, most of the important music during the 1980s was by artists from the 60s and 70s who were still making albums."

If by artists from the 60's and 70's you mean artists who's first albums were in the 60's and 70's then not even close. To make such a statement displays a lack of knowledge of the 80's.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 06.8.10 @ 20:34pm


A CHICAGO CONSPIRACY THEORY

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008, THEN IN 2010 THE CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, BUT THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH, AND THEN, CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S EIGHT YEARS/TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.
THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.
CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THIS YEAR, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN (PRONOUNCED BUFFLIN) BECAME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN 1984 AND 1990, BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN. WAYNE GRETZKY, WHO WAS GRANT FUHR'S TEAMMATE ON THE EDMONTON OILERS, WAS BORN IN 1961, THE SAME YEAR AS BARACK OBAMA, AND WHEN HE RETIRED HE HELD 61 NHL RECORDS.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 06.10.10 @ 10:56am


The Chicago Blackhawks have won the Stanley Cup during a Barack Obama presidency, and now Chicago the band will be inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame sometime between 2011 and 2017!!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 06.10.10 @ 11:00am


*cuckoo clock chimes for midnight*


Posted by Philip on Thursday, 06.10.10 @ 11:34am


...And now, Peter Cetera will be giving the induction speech and performance for David Foster at the 2010 Songwriters Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 12:13pm


"...And now, Peter Cetera will be giving the induction speech and performance for David Foster at the 2010 Songwriters Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 12:13pm"


...and it still doesn't make Chicago a Hall of Fame band.

Posted by Joe Six String on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 12:32pm


I can't wait to see which artists from the 50s, 60s and 70s get inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame after Chicago gets inducted!

Posted by 6996 on Tuesday, 06.22.10 @ 14:52pm


THE TOP 4 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON BILLBOARD

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.2.10 @ 14:17pm

Hey Roy

The difference between Chicago and those 3 other bands is that those 3 other bands still sell millions of records and they still chart high in the Top 10 on Billboard, if not number 1, whenever their record company releases a greatest hits or rarities album. In the Rolling Stones case, they still produce and chart new music. Don't expect Chicago to hold that number 4 position forever. The Bee-Gees are falling too! Be on the look out for the Grateful Dead and Aerosmith. They could still surpass Chicago! The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and The Beach Boys will hold those number 1, 2, and 3 positions forever!!!

Chicago's last 10 charting albums:

21. 1991 - # 66 Twenty 1
22. 1995 - # 90 Night and Day
23. 1997 - # 55 The Heart of Chicago 1967-1997
24. 1998 - # 154 The Heart of Chicago II 1967-1998
25. 1998 - # 47 Chicago's First Christmas
26. 2002 - # 38 The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning
27. 2003 - # 116 Christmas: What's It Gonna Be Santa?
28. 2005 - # 57 Love Songs
29. 2006 - # 41 Chicago XXX
30. 2007 - # 100 The Best of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition
31. 2008 - # 122 Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus

That's very low!!

Plus, correct me if I'm wrong, but the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, and the Beach Boys have each been with the same record company for their entire career, while Chicago has gone from CBS/Columbia, to Warner Brothers, to Reprise, to Chicago Records, to Rhino, and currently no label at all wants them or any new material from them. Chicago is currently working on a new Christmas album to be released in 2011 on Robert Lamm's independent label, Blue Infinity, and it will most likely be available only for download on the internet according to Chicago's official site. The band has also stated that they won't be writing anymore new material. Kiss BILLBOARD goodbye! Goodnight Chicago! It's been a great 45 years!

Posted by 6996 on Friday, 07.9.10 @ 17:49pm


I just saw these guys at the Jones BEach Theater last nignt.

It is an absolute travesty they are not already in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Clearly they rival the Eagles, Beatles, Beach Boys and Stones as one of the greatest harmony gorups of all time, not to mention thei inovatoive use of horn instruements, blended with other traditional rock sounds.

Not having these guys in the hall of fame is equivalent to keeping Pete Rose out of the Baseball Hall of Fame based on talent.

And another thing, Bill Joel should be in the top 100 artists list by Rolling Stone. Please tell me how friggin Kurt Cobain gets raked in the top 50 and they leave out Billy Joel??????

Posted by NYFAN001 on Sunday, 07.11.10 @ 10:24am


Will say it again. It is an absolute discrace Chicago is in already in the Hall of Fame.

It is all political. Jan Wenner keeps them out for personnel reasons????

Billy Joel bashed the Rolling Stone 30 year ago when the said his album at the time was too commerial. He did not play well in the sandbox politically with the Rolling Stone, and gee, what a surprise he is not in theor top 100 list.

Music like any industry or job is highly poitical. If you burn bridges on a job, you may get blacklisted in the profession for the rest of your life.

Posted by NYFAN001 on Sunday, 07.11.10 @ 10:35am


One thing I don't get.

One of the criteria for the Hall of Fame is someone who brought innovation to Rock n Roll.

Chicago brought the brilliant use of horns into traditional rock instruments. Not to mention all of their hits and great song writing.

I think Bill Joel and Chicago suffer from the same stigma with the Rolling Stone and the Hall. They were considered too popish, and not cutting edge.

It pisses me off when someone like Curt Cobain gets ranked higher tham these guys. Cobain can't shine Chicago's shoes.

Posted by NYFAN001 on Sunday, 07.11.10 @ 10:42am


"Chicago brought the brilliant use of horns into traditional rock instruments. Not to mention all of their hits and great song writing."- NYFAN001

The use of horns in rock & roll started way before Chicago came along...

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 07.11.10 @ 10:45am


A CHICAGO CONSPIRACY THEORY

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008, THEN, WITH THE HELP OF BARACK OBAMA, THE CITY OF CHICAGO GOT IN THE BIDDING FOR HOSTING THE 2016 OLYMPICS AND THEY LOST. IN 2010 THE CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, BUT THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH, AND THEN, CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S EIGHT YEARS/TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (2008-2017).

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.
THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.
CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THIS YEAR, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN (PRONOUNCED BUFFLIN) BECAME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN 1984 AND 1990, BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN. WAYNE GRETZKY, WHO WAS GRANT FUHR'S TEAMMATE ON THE EDMONTON OILERS, WAS BORN IN 1961, THE SAME YEAR AS BARACK OBAMA, AND WHEN HE RETIRED HE HELD 61 NHL RECORDS.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 09:36am


CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO CAN BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: vocals; guitar)
10. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
11. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 09:38am


CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO CAN BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: vocals; guitar)
10. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
11. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 09:39am


http://digitaldreamdoor.nutsie.com/pages/best_halloffame_x1.html

FROM THE DIGITAL DREAM DOOR

Chicago

Their chart success is staggering, with nearly 50 hits to their credit, but their style is undoubtedly what turns off potential voters, as they abandoned their early blues-rock upbringing that had featured Terry Kath's guitar pyrotechnics for a more mellow adult contemporary jazzy ballad persona that made them superstars in the 70's and 80's but resulted in often poor critical response. Whether the Hall embraces the oft-maligned image that pop-rock has remains to be seen, even twenty years in to the proceedings.

Qualifications: 5 - Worth Examining, But Will Often Fall Short

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 11:47am


FROM THE BOOK OF ROCK BY PHILIP DODD , 2002

Though they formed in Chicago, the band moved fairly swiftly out to L.A. to work with producer/manager James William Guercio and it was Hollywood rather than the Windy City that set the tone for their jazz-rock fusion. Their first outings had been relatively earthy under the name Chicago Transit Authority, but after their name had been shortened and their logo created, it was showbiz (and a string of hits) all the way, including 1976's smoochadelic 'If You Leave Me Now'. Much derided for naming their albums like Rocky movies - their line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven albums only by the death of guitarist Terry Kath. Fellow jazz rockers like Blood, Sweat & Tears and Electric Flag had long since foundered and cynical onlookers considered Chicago by far the smartest outfit for wising up to the limitations of the genre and opting for commercial success.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 08.3.10 @ 07:52am


I felt somebody tap me on the back and I turned around and it's Jimi Hendrix staring me in the face. He says I got to tell you your guitar player is way better than me, and he says the horns are like one set of lungs, and I'm sitting there like okay someone slip me acid.

-Walter Parazaider

Jimi Hendrix told me, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away."

-James William Guercio

Posted by Roy on Friday, 08.13.10 @ 08:06am


Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs.

-Jimi Hendrix

I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away."

-Jimi Hendrix

Posted by Roy on Monday, 08.16.10 @ 09:18am


My Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Speech For Chicago Is Coming Soon!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 08.17.10 @ 11:16am


Chicago

THE 2008 HIT PARADE HALL OF FAME
THE 1992 HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 08.18.10 @ 13:01pm


http://www.hitparadehalloffame.com/Inductees_all/Chicago.html

THE 2008 HIT PARADE HALL OF FAME

Chicago

In 1967 Walt Parazaider (born Chicago IL, March 14, 1945), Terry Kath (born Chicago IL, January 31, 1945), Danny Seraphine (born Chicago IL, August 28, 1948), James Pankow (born St. Louis MO, August 20, 1947), Lee Loughnane and Robert Lamm (born Brooklyn NY October 13, 1944) formed a rock and roll band with horns and named it The Big Thing. Parazaider and Kath had been in The Missing Links and had met most of their band mates while at De Paul University. They soon recruited Peter Cetera (born Chicago IL, September 13, 1944) from another local band, The Exceptions. Jim Guercio, who Parazaider and Kath also had met at De Paul, was by this time a producer for CBS Records.
Guercio got them signed to the label and suggested a name change to The Chicago Transit Authority.

In 1969 they released their first album, The Chicago Transit Authority, which was embraced by FM rock radio and went gold without benefit of a single. The following year they released Chicago II. Guercio insisted that they continue the practice of using the group’s logo, rather than a picture of the band, on the album cover. This album broke the group on Top 40 radio, as "Make Me Smile", "25 Or 6 To 4" and “Does Anybody Know What Time It Is” entered the top ten of the Hit Parade.

The singles from their Chicago III were less successful. After the singles from Chicago III had run their course, Columbia turned back to the first and second albums which were still in the charts, re-releasing as a single "Beginnings" backed by "Color My World," and then "Questions 67 and 68". All became hits and reignited interest in those earlier albums. Producer Guercio was able to convince CBS to release the ambitious four record set, “Chicago At Carnegie Hall”, which sold gold upon release.

In 1972, the group released Chicago V, which contained the top five single hit “Saturday In The Park.” Chicago VI was released in 1973 and spawned the hits “Feeling Stronger Every Day” and “Just You N’ Me”. Chicago VII was recorded at Guercio’s new Caribou Ranch studios in Colorado. It was preceded by the February 1974 single release of "(I've Been) Searchin' So Long". "Call On Me" and "Wishing You Were Here", which featured members of The Beach Boys.

Their 1975 album, Chicago VIII contained the top 5 hit “Old Days”. Chicago IX, a greatest hits album, was also released that year.Chicago X , released in 1976, contained the group’s first number one single If You Leave Me Now”, which was a stylistic departure for the band. The album won three Grammy awards; two for "If You Leave Me Now" and one for the album’s artwork. The group’s 1977 album, Chicago XI, contained the hit “Baby What A Big Surprise”.

In January 1978, Terry Kath died of an accidental gunshot wound. He was replaced by Donnie Dacus. In the fall of 1981, Chicago added Bill Champlin (born Oakland, CA, May 21, 1947) from The Sons of Champlin. Champlin recommended producer/songwriter David Foster to the group.

The first album produced by Foster, Chicago 16, was released in 1982 and contained the hit “Hard To Say I’m Sorry”. Chicago 17, released in May 1984, became the band's greatest seller and contained the hits "Stay The Night", "Hard Habit To Break" and "You're The Inspiration". Peter Cetera left in 1985 and was replaced by Jason Scheff.

Chicago 18 contained the hit “Will You Still Love Me”. Chicago 19 contained a chart topping #1 single, “Look Away.” In 1990 Danny Seraphine and the group parted company and was replaced by Tris Imboden.

Chicago continues to perform and record. Chicago 20 was issued in 1991; Chicago 30 was issued in 2006. The following year they released The Best Of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition.

With an estimated worldwide record sales of over 120 million units; from eighteen gold and thirteen platinum albums as well as fifty hit singles, including twenty top 10 and five #1 records, five of which are gold.

Chicago was recognized with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on July 23, 1992.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 08.23.10 @ 07:20am


How many times have you copy/pasted that same bio?

Posted by amazon on Monday, 08.23.10 @ 07:36am


In response to those who have poined out BS&T and The Doors in oppositon to Chicago's innovation, I don't think you should discredit one groups contributions because someone else did it first. You wouldn't discredit Black Sabbath's contribuitons to metal beacuse The Beatles and Iron Butterfly did it first would you (with Helter Skelter and In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida respectively). Chicago definitely pushed the boundaries for jazz rock but deftly blending jazz, hard rock, adult comtemporary and even a little R&B to create a totally unique sound. That should count as innovation, especially since The Doors and BS&T didn't experiment with jazz rock the same way either.

Posted by Jimbo on Thursday, 09.9.10 @ 17:44pm


Chicago 1970s Top 40 Hits Written by Robert Lamm:

Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is? * Beginnings * Questions 67 & 68 * 25 Or 6 To 4 * Free * Dialogue (Parts 1 & 2) * Saturday In The Park * Harry Truman

Chicago 1970s Top 40 Hits Written by James Pankow:

Make Me Smile * Colour My World * Feelin' Stronger Everyday * Just You 'N' Me * (I've Been) Searchin' So Long * Old Days

Chicago 1970s Top 40 Hits Written by Peter Cetera:

Feelin' Stronger Everyday * Happy Man * Wishing You Were Here * If You Leave Me Now * Baby, What A Big Surprise * No Tell Lover

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 07:06am


Elton John vs. Chicago

1973 - Saturday Night's Alright For Fighting
1972 - Saturday In The Park

1976 - Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word
1982 - Hard To Say I'm Sorry

1988 - I Don't Wanna Go On With You Like That
1988 - I Don't Wanna Live Without Your Love

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 07:15am


THE TOP 4 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART AND THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago

My induction speech for Chicago, coming this week!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 12:29pm


Happy 66th Birthday, Peter Cetera, Baby What A Big Surprise.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 14:13pm


My induction speech for Chicago, coming this week!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 12:29pm

Oh goody, I can`t wait for the madness!

Posted by Qaz on Sunday, 09.19.10 @ 06:41am


A CHICAGO CONSPIRACY THEORY

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008, THEN IN 2010 THE CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, BUT THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH, THEN, PETER CETERA GAVE THE SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR DAVID FOSTER IN 2010, AND THEN, CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S EIGHT YEARS/TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THIS YEAR, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN (PRONOUNCED BUFFLIN) BECAME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN 1984 AND 1990, BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN. WAYNE GRETZKY, WHO WAS GRANT FUHR'S TEAMMATE ON THE EDMONTON OILERS, WAS BORN IN 1961, THE SAME YEAR AS BARACK OBAMA, AND WHEN HE RETIRED HE HELD 61 NHL RECORDS. LIKE BARACK OBAMA AND WAYNE GRETZKY, JOHN F. KENNEDY JR. AND PRINCESS DIANA WERE ALSO BORN IN 1961. JOHN F. KENNEDY WAS ASSASSINATED IN 1963. WHEN WAYNE GRETZKY RETIRED IN 1999 HE HAD 1,963 CAREER ASSISTS IN REGULAR SEASON NHL PLAY. JOHN F. KENNEDY JR. DIED IN A PLANE CRASH IN 1999, THE SAME YEAR THAT WAYNE GRETZKY RETIRED WITH 1963 ASSISTS, THE SAME NUMBER AS THE YEAR OF JOHN F. KENNEDY`S ASSASSINATION.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 09.20.10 @ 07:25am


Chicago Resumes

01. Walter Parazaider - Chicago
02. Lee Loughnane - Chicago
03. James Pankow - Chicago
04. Robert Lamm - Chicago, Beckley-Lamm-Wilson
05. Terry Kath - Chicago
06. Peter Cetera - The Exceptions, Chicago
07. Danny Seraphine - Chicago
08. Laudir De Oliveira - Sergio Mendez, Chicago
09. Donnie Dacus - Hair, Cats, Chicago, Badfinger
10. Chris Pinnick - Herb Alpert, Chicago
11. Bill Champlin - The Sons of Champlin, Chicago
12. Jason Scheff - Keane, Chicago
13. Dawayne Bailey - The Silver Bullet Band, Chicago
14. Tris Imboden - Honk, Firefall, Chicago
15. Keith Howland - Chicago

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 09.23.10 @ 05:32am


Daniel Peter "Danny" Seraphine (born August 28, 1948 in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.) is an American drummer, record producer, theatrical producer and film producer, best known for being the original drummer and founding member of the rock group Chicago, a tenure which lasted from February 1967 to May 1990. Danny Seraphine was born in Chicago and raised in the Little Italy district. He started playing drums at the age of nine. When he was 15 years old, Seraphine dropped out of high school, but eventually studied privately with famed percussionist Bob Tillis at DePaul University, where members of Chicago's horn section were also studying. He continued his education with big band drummer Chuck Flores, followed by two years of study under jazz drummer Jo Jones (also known as Papa Jo Jones) in the mid-1970s. By the late 1960s, Seraphine was drumming in various bands, including one with teen friends Walter Parazaider (saxophone and woodwinds) and Terry Kath (guitar). Named at first The Big Thing, the band eventually became Chicago after the addition of Lee Loughnane (trumpet), James Pankow (trombone), Robert Lamm (keyboards) and Peter Cetera (bass). Their producer and manager, James William Guercio, moved Chicago out to Los Angeles and they became the house band at the Whisky A Go Go. They subsequently obtained a contract with Columbia Records and recorded their first album - a double album - in just two weeks. The album was titled after the band's name, The Chicago Transit Authority, and released in 1969. (The band would later shorten their name to Chicago). While he did not contribute significantly as a songwriter at first, Seraphine eventually co-wrote several songs for the band: "Lowdown" (a Top 40 hit for the band), "Little One," "Take Me Back to Chicago," "Show Me the Way," "Birthday Boy" and "Street Player." His writing partner was often David "Hawk" Wolinski, the keyboardist for Chaka Khan and Rufus. From the mid-1970s until the early-1980s, Seraphine was the principal and most well-known owner of B'Ginnings, a large musical showcase nightclub in Schaumburg, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. In early March 1990, following shows in Belfast, Dublin, and Birmingham, Seraphine played his final two shows with Chicago at the Hammersmith Odeon in London, England. In May, Chicago's manager, Howard Kaufman, called Seraphine to inform him that the other members of the band had held a meeting and voted him out as their drummer. Chicago trombonist James Pankow has asserted that Seraphine did not practice enough, and that live shows were adversely affected by his performances, with the last show at the Hammersmith Odeon being the final motivating factor for Seraphine being fired.[1] Later interviews with Pankow and Lamm clarified this stance, indicating that the band was upset with Seraphine's insistence on taking sight-seeing trips of the English countryside during that leg of the tour. Seraphine and his wife were arising early on the days of these shows to take tours of castles and estates. Seraphine would then arrive at the concert venue late and totally exhausted from the day's activities, resulting in sluggish and unpredictable drumming. This problem was evident in reviews by the English press; in fact, it was many years before Chicago would venture onto British soil again. Seraphine has said, "The reason I’m no longer in Chicago is the lead singers, the new lead singers, Jason Scheff and Bill Champlin, didn’t like the fact that a drummer was running the band." They subsequently gave an ultimatum to the other band members that either Seraphine be let go or the two of them would leave the band. He went on to say, "Out of all people that should be criticizing me for not practicing, it shouldn’t be Jim Pankow because there’s a guy that has really neglected his craft." Danny did practice and work on his technique after his divorce and the loss of his family lifestyle in such a sudden way. After being dismissed from Chicago, Seraphine settled for many years in Colorado, where he kept himself busy with a variety of musical and theatrical projects, including producing local musical acts. Seraphine has since moved back to the Los Angeles area.In more recent years, Seraphine has turned his attention to producing and resourcing investment for Broadway shows, which included bringing the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical "Bombay Dreams" to Broadway following its London run. 2009 saw the release of Lonely Street, a film for which Seraphine served as an executive producer and the music supervisor. His daughter, Taryn, was included in a recent episode of Punk'd in a gag that involved her as one of many being interviewed as a possible intern for Ashton Kutcher. The episode also featured Tom Arnold, who visited the house while Kutcher was gone. In early 2006, Danny Seraphine debuted a new band, California Transit Authority (CTA), featuring himself on drums, Marc Bonilla on lead guitar, Mick Mahan on bass guitar, Ed Roth and Peter Fish on keyboards, Mike Wallace on guitar, and Larry Braggs on vocals. Seraphine and Bonilla initially put the band together to play for several charity benefit shows. Following a positive response, they put together a full 70 minute set. Their first Los Angeles area performance took place at the Canyon Club on January 27, 2006. Included in the new band's repertoire are several Chicago songs, including "Make Me Smile," "25 or 6 to 4," "South California Purples," "Happy Cause I’m Going Home," "Devil’s Sweet" and Steve Winwood's "I'm A Man". Also included is a be-bop number co-written by Seraphine, which features a drum solo Seraphine describes as "challenging". Seraphine considers "Something Different" (a hard-driving jazz-rock cover of a Cannonball Adderley song) to be the band's signature piece, which highlights Bonilla's virtuosity as both a player and an arranger. CTA released their first studio album, Full Circle, on August 14, 2007, followed by a tour of the United States. When Seraphine first started recording with Chicago he was a faithful user of Rogers and Slingerland drums, whose kits were being made famous by Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa (Seraphine has stated Rich as a major influence, which is probably why he chose Slingerland for so long). He used a wide array Slingerland drum sets from 1969 through 1984's Chicago 17 tour. He switched to Yamaha drums for the final leg of the 1985 Chicago 17 tour and played Yamaha drums on Chicago 18 (1986) and its subsequent tour (through 1987). In 1988 Seraphine became an endorser of the now widely popular DW drums. Today he still endorses DW, along with Zildjian cymbals and Remo drum heads.

Walter Parazaider (born March 14, 1945 in Chicago, Illinois) is best known for being a founding member and saxophone player for the rock band Chicago. He also plays the flute and other woodwind instruments in the band, including clarinet, he is also an accomplished guitarist, and has been known to play rhythm guitar for the band on occasion. Parazaider began playing the clarinet at the age of 9. As a teenager, his growing talent was being groomed for a career as a professional orchestral musician, and he gained a Bachelor of Arts degree in classical clarinet performance from DePaul University. Inspired by the Beatles hit "Got To Get You Into My Life", Parazaider became enamored with the idea of creating a rock 'n' roll band with horns. Early practice sessions at Parazaider's house included guitarist Terry Kath and drummer Danny Seraphine, who were both friends during his teenage years. Another friend who became involved was future Chicago producer James William Guercio. The band, originally called The Big Thing, eventually became Chicago with the addition of Lee Loughnane on trumpet, James Pankow on trombone, Robert Lamm on keyboards and Peter Cetera on bass. Parazaider's primary musical role in the band has consisted of playing saxophone, flute, and woodwinds on James Pankow's horn arrangements. Never a prolific writer, Parazaider's compositional contributions ("It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement", "Free Country", "Aire", "Devil's Sweet", "Window Dreamin'") have been minimal relative to the other members. Parazaider performs the highly recognizable flute solo in the Chicago hit "Colour My World", which became a popular 'slow-dance' song at high school proms during the 1970s. In 2008, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters by DePaul University. He is also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and will be given the National Citation as well as being recognized as Signature Sinfonian along with fellow Chicago members and Sinfonians on August 26th, 2009. A member of Chicago since its inception, Parazaider continues to tour extensively with the band (and is occasionally filled in for by Ray Herrmann). Walt has been married to his wife JacLynn for almost four decades and has two children, Laura and Felicia.

Terry Alan Kath (January 31, 1946 – January 23, 1978), born in Chicago, Illinois, was the original guitarist and founding member of the rock band Chicago. He died in 1978 at the age of 31 from an unintentional self-inflicted gunshot wound. A singer and multi-instrumentalist who played lead & rhythm guitar, banjo, accordion, bass guitar, and drums, Kath was lead guitarist in a band called Jimmy and the Gentlemen during the mid-1960s. At another time, he played bass in a road band called Jimmy Ford and the Executives. Kath's compatriot, James William Guercio (who subsequently became Chicago's producer), was lead guitarist in one of two road bands, each performing on The Dick Clark Show; Kath held the bassist's chair in the other band.[1] Additionally, Kath's close friend, sax and flute man Walter Parazaider, played in several of these bands on The Dick Clark Show. They, in turn, worked together with drummer Danny Seraphine to develop the group they initially called The Missing Links. Practicing at Parazaider's apartment, they soon joined up with trombonist James Pankow, trumpeter Lee Loughnane, and singing keyboardist Bobby Lamm to form The Big Thing (known occasionally as The Big Sound). With the addition of The Exceptions' singer/bassist/accordionist Peter Cetera they moved to Los Angeles and signed with Columbia Records. The band name became Chicago Transit Authority. In 1967 the name was shortened to Chicago. Kath was an important contributor to Chicago, beginning with their first album The Chicago Transit Authority ("CTA" for short), released April 28, 1969. The album includes his composition "Introduction" which was described as "Terry's masterpiece" by later Chicago guitarist Dawayne Bailey.[citation needed] The song displays many varied musical styles, including jazz, blues, salsa, rock and roll, acid rock, and pop. The same debut album includes an instrumental guitar piece entitled "Free Form Guitar", which consisted largely of feedback and heavy use of the instrument's mechanical vibrato assembly, or tremolo arm, in a style similar to that of Jimi Hendrix's rendition of The Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock. The album liner notes indicate that the nearly seven minute piece was recorded 'live' in the studio in one take - using only an overdriven Fender Showman amplifier and a Fender Stratocaster guitar - during which, according to a 1971 Guitar Player Magazine interview with Kath, the Strat's (presumably broken) neck "...was held together with a radiator hose clamp." On the inside of the album's gatefold sleeve, however, Kath is pictured playing a Gibson SG. The hit "Questions 67 & 68" contains lead guitar techniques that became staples of the Chicago sound.[citation needed] The song "Beginnings" includes acoustic rhythm guitar by Kath. Another of Kath's more notable highlights as a recording guitarist is his extended guitar solo in the middle of the Chicago hit song "25 or 6 to 4". Fascinated by gadgets, Kath once owned close to 20 guitars, though his early staples were the aforementioned Gibson SG and Fender Stratocaster. He was also one of the few well-known guitarists to make regular use of the unique 1969 Les Paul "Professional" model, which sported a pair of unconventional low-impedance pickups, requiring a special impedance-matching transformer for use with a standard high-impedance-input amplifier. His guitars utilized no special tunings or unusual modifications. Kath later became associated with a specially-decorated Fender Telecaster and was connected with Pignose amplifiers. He experimented with a wide variety of amplification and distortion devices and used a wah-wah pedal frequently. Kath's singing was also an important feature of Chicago's sound. In a group of many song composers who often let other members of the band do the lead singing on their compositions, Kath's vocal style can be heard in "Colour My World" and "Make Me Smile" , both from Chicago. His screaming in the live version of "Free" from Chicago at Carnegie Hall, released in 1971, is another example of his singing style. Kath also played bass and sings lead vocal in the closing song "Tell Me" in the 1973 drama movie Electra Glide in Blue. "Tell Me" was also used as the last song in the final episode of Miami Vice.Kath was also a massive influence on contemporary musicians at the time. Jimi Hendrix explicitly referred to him several times before his death, saying things such as "(Terry Kath) is better than me," and "(Terry Kath)'s the best guitar player in the universe. Kath reportedly had a history of using alcohol and other drugs, including cocaine, and struggled with weight problems in his last few years. He gained a noticeable amount of weight through his career, and by 1976 he was quite overweight. Chicago bandmates have indicated that he was also increasingly unhappy.[citation needed] Bassist Peter Cetera even went so far as to say that Kath would have been the first to quit Chicago had he lived (and, according to then-producer James William Guercio, Kath was working on a solo album before he died).[5] Despite his personal problems, this was not the cause of his accidental death. Around 5 p.m. on January 23, 1978, after a party at roadie / band technician Don Johnson's home in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, Kath took an unloaded .38 revolver and put it to his head, pulling the trigger several times on the empty chambers. Johnson had warned Kath several times to be careful. Kath then picked up a semiautomatic 9 mm pistol and, leaning back in a chair, he said to both his wife and Johnson, "Don't worry, it's not loaded" -- however, one bullet remained in the chamber. After showing the empty magazine to Johnson, Kath replaced the magazine into the gun, put the gun to his temple, and pulled the trigger, thereby killing himself instantly.[6] It was the week before his 32nd birthday. Kath was interred in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California. Kath and his wife Camelia Emily Ortiz (married 1974) had one daughter, Michelle, born in 1976. Camelia later married Kiefer Sutherland.

Lee Loughnane (pronounced LOCK-nane), born 21 October 1946 in Elmwood Park, Illinois to Juanita Wall and Philip Louis Loughnane, is an American trumpeter, flugelhorn player, vocalist, and songwriter, best known for being a founding member of the rock band Chicago. Loughnane was influenced by his father Philip (also a trumpeter). Through his friendship with guitarist Terry Kath, Loughnane met drummer Danny Seraphine and saxophone/woodwind player Walter Parazaider. Parazaider, who was trying to form a rock 'n roll band with horns, encouraged Loughnane to sit in on rehearsals. At first, the group was known as The Big Thing. Eventually it became The Chicago Transit Authority (later renamed Chicago) with the addition of members James Pankow (trombone), Robert Lamm (keyboards), and Peter Cetera (bass). Loughnane has continued to be a member of Chicago since its inception. Loughnane's songwriting contributions for Chicago have included the hit singles "Call on Me" from Chicago VII and "No Tell Lover" from Hot Streets, as well as album cuts such as "Together Again" on Chicago X and "This Time" on Chicago XI. Loughnane received his lead vocal debut on the Terry Kath composition "Song of The Evergreens" on Chicago VII. He has also provided background vocals on several Chicago songs, and the occasional lead vocal such as on "Let it Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!" from Chicago XXV: The Christmas Album. He is also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and will be given the National Citation as well as being recognized as Signature Sinfonian along with fellow Chicago members and Sinfonians on August 26, 2009. In recent years, Loughnane has taken on a growing leadership role in the band. He has directed Chicago's remastering effort of its song catalogue, and he provides on-stage leadership during live performances. He is the member of the band who is the most gracious and outwardly friendly during live performances. Loughnane comes from a large family, which includes a Chicago cop, a church choir leader, a world leader in electronic academic reference suites, a CFO and an Elmwood Park library associate. Loughnane has been married several times: to Susan Marie Steele (1970–1972) to Elizabeth Cunneff (married 1979) [4] and with whom he has a son, Brian Patrick (b. 1976); and to Patricia Leininger, with whom he has a daughter River Brittany (b. 1988) and a son Dylan Lee (b. 1992). Loughnane also adopted Cunneff's daughter Catherine Elizabeth "Cat" (b. 1970)[7] He is currently married to the former Megan Cathleen Brown with whom he has a son Lee II. The couple resides in Branson, MO.

James Carter "Jimmy" Pankow (born August 20, 1947) is an American trombone player, songwriter and brass instrument arranger best known for being a founding member of the rock band Chicago. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Pankow moved with his family to Park Ridge, Illinois at the age of eight, where he started playing the trombone at St. Paul of the Cross Elementary School. He is the older brother of actor John Pankow. One of nine siblings, Pankow was influenced by his father, Wayne (who was also a musician), and by his Notre Dame High School band instructor, Father George Wiskirchen. Pankow earned a full music scholarship to Quincy College, where he studied the bass trombone. After completing his freshman year, he returned home for the summer and formed a band that began to play some live local shows. Not wanting to give up this work, Pankow transferred to DePaul University.He is also a member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and will be given the National Citation as well as being recognized as Signature Sinfonian along with fellow Chicago members and Sinfonians on August 26, 2009. Since the early 1970s he has been a close personal friend of ex-Eagles guitarist Don Felder. On May 5, 1972, he married Karen Marie Green. They had two children, Jonathan James and Sarah Noel. The two divorced in December 1993. On May 9, 1998 he married Jeanne Elisabeth Pacelli in Chicago. They had two children, Carter Wayne and Lillian Pierce. The family recently relocated to Tennessee. At DePaul, Pankow met Walter Parazaider, who recruited him to join a band named The Big Thing—which would eventually become Chicago. Pankow has remained a member of Chicago since its inception. In addition to playing the trombone, Pankow has composed many songs for Chicago, including the hits "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World" (both from his suite Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon), "Just You 'N' Me," "(I've Been) Searchin' So Long," "Old Days," "Alive Again," and (with Peter Cetera) "Feelin' Stronger Every Day." He has also composed most of Chicago's brass arrangements over the years and, as a result, is perhaps the person most responsible for the "Chicago sound." Although Pankow is not one of the band's principal vocalists, he sang lead vocals for two Chicago songs: "You Are On My Mind" (from Chicago X, 1976) and "Till the End of Time" (Chicago XI, 1977). Pankow along with fellow Chicago horns Lee Loughnane and Walter Parazaider was featured on Three Dog Night's 1969 #15 hit Celebrate (Pankow has appeared on several albums for the rock band Toto, including the 1982 Grammy Award winning Toto IV and their 2006 album Falling In Between, for which he composed the brass arrangements and performed on the song "Dying On My Feet." Pankow, along with Lee Loughnane and Walt Parazaider also appear on the 1979 Bee Gees' "Spirits Having Flown" album playing horns on several tracks.

Robert William Lamm (born October 13, 1944) is an American keyboardist, singer and songwriter best known for being a founding member of the rock band Chicago. He wrote many of the band's biggest hits, including "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," "Beginnings," "Saturday in the Park," and "25 or 6 to 4." Robert Lamm was born in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Chicago, Illinois. He studied art in high school, particularly drawing and painting, but changed direction in college by enrolling in the music program at Roosevelt University in Chicago. In a 2003 interview, Lamm said, "My early training was really as a member of a church choir when I was a kid. It was a very good choir in Brooklyn, New York (Harry Chapin and members of his band were also in this choir at around the same time). It exposed me to some of the great sacred music from the Middle Ages, right up through Bach and into some of the 20th Century composers." Apart from his involvement with Chicago, Lamm has recorded several solo albums, beginning in 1974. (An even earlier solo excursion, 1972's "Where You Think You're Going?", was an anti-drug commercial in the form of a 1-minute song ending in a voiceover.) He also has guest lectured on music production at Stanford University. In the mid-90's, he formed a trio with Gerry Beckley of 'America' and Carl Wilson of 'The Beach Boys'. After Carl's death, an album was released entitled "Like A Brother" (Blue Infinity 2005). Lamm has also performed with Les Deux Love Orchestra. Robert also played with a group known as "The Trendells" on the South Side of Chicago. Several members were also from the So Side including: Roland Gomez and Sonny Remus. Robert married Julie Nini, sister of Peter Cetera's first wife, Diane Nini. Robert and Julie had a daughter Sacha before divorcing. Julie Nini later became involved with racecar driver Danny Sullivan. He was also married to Candace Fagan. In 1985 Lamm married soap opera actress Alex Donnelley with whom he has two daughters, Kate and Sean; Lamm and Donnelley have since divorced. He resides in New York and Los Angeles.

Peter Paul Cetera (born September 13, 1944, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.) is an American singer, songwriter, bass guitar player and producer best known for being an original member of the rock band Chicago, before launching a successful solo career. As a solo artist Cetera has scored five Top 40 singles, including two that reached number 1 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart. Cetera (pronounced /səˈtɛrə/ sə-TERR-ə) was born and raised in the Morgan Park section of Chicago, Illinois, located on the far South Side. He was the second of six children and is of Polish descent. According to one source his father worked as a "machinist", indicating he comes from a blue collar background. Cetera's siblings include two brothers, Tim Cetera and Kenny Cetera, who are listed as contributing musicians on some of the recordings he made with Chicago and on some of his solo recordings. Cetera attended Mendel Catholic Prep High School, graduating in 1962, and is listed among the "Notable Alumni". Cetera's interest in music began at 11 years of age when his parents bought him an accordion instead of the guitar he wanted. When he was 15, some older students from his high school took him to a club to see a band called The Rebel Rockers, which led to his purchasing an acoustic guitar at Montgomery Ward. He eventually took up the bass guitar, and with some high school friends—a drummer, guitarist and saxophone player—Cetera began playing the local dance circuit, dividing lead vocals with the guitarist. Cetera played in several groups in the Chicago area, including a popular local rock band named The Exceptions, which toured the Midwest in the mid 1960s, releasing two albums and several singles. Cetera is quoted as saying, "By the time I was 18 I was making more money than my dad." In December 1967, Cetera arrived early for a show to watch a band called The Big Thing. Impressed by their use of a horn section combined with rock and roll, Cetera left The Exceptions to join The Big Thing within two weeks. The Big Thing, which soon changed its name to The Chicago Transit Authority (and eventually shortened it to Chicago after complaints by the actual CTA), released their self-titled debut album The Chicago Transit Authority on Columbia Records in 1969. Cetera sang lead vocal on three of the eleven songs on the album, with his tenor voice complementing the baritone voices of the two other lead singers in the group, keyboardist Robert Lamm and guitarist Terry Kath. His trademark singing style would develop as a result of having to sing for a period of time with a wired-shut jaw after getting into a brawl at a Los Angeles Dodgers game in 1969. The follow-up album, Chicago, vaulted the band to popular status throughout the world. The song "25 or 6 to 4" was the first major hit single with Cetera singing lead vocals. Chicago is also notable for featuring Cetera's first songwriting effort, "Where Do We Go From Here?" As the 1970s progressed, Cetera would become a more prolific songwriter for the group, contributing the hits "Wishing You Were Here" (#11) and "Happy Man" from the 1974 album Chicago VII. His biggest singing and songwriting accomplishment with Chicago came in 1976 with their first worldwide No. 1 single, the ballad "If You Leave Me Now." Cetera's next composition in 1977, "Baby, What A Big Surprise" (#4), also became a major hit and cemented the band's status in the late 1970s as a "ballad band." By the end of the 1970s, with the rise of disco music, Chicago's popularity declined, culminating in the release of the band's poorest-selling album Chicago XIV (#71) in 1980. Columbia Records subsequently bought out the remainder of Chicago's contract. In 1981, Cetera released his first solo album, Peter Cetera, on Warner Bros. Records, after personally buying the rights from his previous contract with Columbia Records, who would not release the project. The album was, subsequently, a commercial failure, which Cetera attributed to Warner Bros.' refusal to promote him as a solo artist out of fear that he would leave Chicago, who had only recently signed with the label. In 1982, David Foster was brought in as producer and the resulting group effort was Chicago 16 (#9). The album represented a major comeback for Chicago, and leading the way was the hit single co-written (with Foster) and featured Cetera on lead vocals, "Hard to Say I'm Sorry," which went to #1 in the charts. The second single, "Love Me Tomorrow," was also co-written (again with Foster) and sung by Cetera, reaching No. 22 on the singles chart. The third single, "What You're Missing," was yet again sung by Cetera. In 1983, he took a break from his duties as Chicago frontman to add backing vocals on Paul Anka's final U.S. Top-40 hit Hold Me Til The Mornin' Comes, which debuted in the summer of that year.When Chicago 17 was released in 1984, it became the veteran band's most successful selling album in their history, eventually going on to sell over 7 million copies in the United States alone. All four singles released from the album were sung by Cetera, including three which he co-wrote, and all of them charted in the top 20: "Stay the Night" (#16), "Hard Habit to Break" (#3), "You're the Inspiration" (#3) and "Along Comes a Woman" (#14).With the advent of the music video and the growing popularity of MTV, Cetera became the 'face' and public leader of the longtime faceless band that was Chicago. With his newfound popularity, Cetera was interested in recording another solo album. In addition, he had stated his lack of interest for the extensive touring schedule of the band, especially to promote Chicago 17. When the 17 Tour concluded in May 1985, Chicago's management, along with several members of the band, had expressed a desire to book another tour for that summer and start work on the next Chicago album. Cetera insisted that they take a break from touring so that he could concentrate on a solo album and spend more time with his family. After the band rejected his offer to stay in the band while recording a solo album (similar to the arrangement between Phil Collins and Genesis at the time), it was announced that Cetera and Chicago would go their separate ways in July 1985. Almost immediately, Cetera continued his streak of success. His first single, "Glory of Love" (the theme to the movie The Karate Kid, Part II), was a US No. 1 hit in 1986, and achieved similar success throughout the world. It went on to win an ASCAP Award for Most Performed Songs from Motion Pictures and a BMI Film & TV Award for Most Performed Song from a Film. It was also nominated for both an Academy Award and a Golden Globe in the category of Best Original Song, as well as a Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Male Artist.[10] His album, Solitude/Solitaire, released in 1986, was also successful, selling over 1 million copies and producing another No. 1 hit single, "The Next Time I Fall," a duet with Amy Grant,[11] which was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group. In fact, Solitude/Solitaire outsold Chicago 18 (#35), the first Chicago album without him.His third solo album, One More Story, was released in 1988 and contained the No. 4 hit single "One Good Woman" and "Save Me," the original opening theme for the television show Baywatch. In 1988 he recorded another duet, this time with Madonna. The song, "Sheherazade" was included on his album.In 1989, Cetera recorded another duet, this time with Cher, called "After All," which was included on the soundtrack of the movie Chances Are. It reached #6 on the US charts.. In 1992, his final album on Warner Bros. Records, World Falling Down, was released. It featured the Adult Contemporary #1 hit, "Restless Heart", as well as two other successful singles: "Even a Fool Can See" and a duet with Chaka Khan, "Feels Like Heaven." In 1995, Cetera released his first album for River North Records, One Clear Voice, and featured the hit single, "(I Wanna Take) Forever Tonight," a duet with actress Crystal Bernard. Following the release of the album, Cetera launched his first solo tour—accompanied by his River North labelmate, country singer Ronna Reeves -- lasting into 1996. 1997 brought You're the Inspiration: A Collection, a collection of all his duets from over the years, along with three re-recorded songs he had written while a member of Chicago, and two brand new recordings. 2001 saw the release of Another Perfect World. In 2002, Cetera performed a medley of four of his songs at The Concert for World Children's Day, backed by David Foster and an orchestra at Arie Crown Theater in Chicago. Subsequently, this led to his appearance, in 2003, with the Chicago Pops Orchestra on the PBS music program Soundstage, which was broadcast throughout the United States and released on DVD. From 2003 until the summer of 2007, Cetera performed a very limited number of concerts each year with a 40 piece orchestra, playing re-arrangements of songs from throughout his career, including several from his tenure as a member of Chicago. In 2004, Cetera released a collection of holiday classics, You Just Gotta Love Christmas, which featured background and duet vocals by his eldest daughter, Claire. Cetera has sung "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" at Wrigley Field for a Chicago Cubs game at least three times: in 2003; on August 16, 2007, for a game that was televised on WGN-TV; and again on May 2, 2009 on Comcast Sports Net. In December 2007, Cetera embarked on the You Just Gotta Love Christmas tour of the United States. It marked his return to a traditional rock band show, his first since 1996, featured songs from his 2004 Christmas album and from throughout his career. Shortly after Cetera was featured in the cover story of the December 2007 issue of Bass Player magazine he saw Mike Huckabee, former governor of Arkansas, playing bass guitar on television. Cetera sent his compliments, along with an autographed copy of the issue, to Huckabee, who was at that time a presidential hopeful in the 2008 Republican primaries. Huckabee said, “I was totally awestruck to get a letter from Peter Cetera. …having one of the greatest bass players in my generation give me a compliment is like winning New Hampshire." Cetera has appeared in two movies: Electra Glide in Blue, filmed in 1973, where he played the character of Bob Zemko; and Sidney Sheldon's Memories of Midnight, a 1991 television movie made for the USA Network, where he played the role of Larry Douglas. He appeared in the 2010 Adult Swim program Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!. In 1982, Cetera married Diane Nini, with whom he had his first daughter. Claire, born in 1983, graduated from the University of Southern California in 2006 and is currently an artist, actor, singer and producer living in Los Angeles. She was previously a competitive snowboarder. This was Cetera's second marriage. An earlier marriage to first wife Janice ended in divorce. Cetera and Nini divorced in 1991. For a period of time, Cetera was brother-in-law to bandmate Robert Lamm, who had married Diane's sister, Julie. They have since been divorced. His second daughter, Senna, born in 1997 by an ex-girlfriend, lives in Nashville, where in 2006, she starred in the music video for country singer Josh Turner's song, "Would You Go with Me," which was a No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot Country Songs Chart. Cetera has lived in Sun Valley, Idaho, since the mid-1980s, where he routinely participates in numerous sports, including basketball, mountain biking, soccer, ice hockey and motorcycling. Cetera was mentioned in an advertisement for Heineken beer. A young man at an assisted living home asked one of the residents why he liked Peter Cetera. The older resident replied that he didn't like Cetera, but the ladies did, "and if you like the ladies, you like Cetera."

Laudir Soares de Oliveira (born January 6, 1940 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is a Brazilian percussionist. His first professional experience was with Sérgio Mendes. Credited as "Laudir," he also appeared on Joe Cocker's 1969 debut album playing on his hit single, "Feelin' Alright". In 1973 he started working with the band Chicago as a sideman,[1] playing on the albums Chicago VI and Chicago VII before officially joining the band in 1975. He subsequently appeared on the albums Chicago VIII through Chicago XIV. Laudir left Chicago in 1981, and he is now teaching music in Brazil. He also does session and production work.

Donnie Dacus (October 12, 1951) is a musician best known for his work in in the band Chicago and his role as Woof Daschund in the 1979 movie Hair. Don Dacus was born in Galena Park, Texas on October 12, 1951. His music endeavor began in a teenage band called The Shux, in honor of Jimi Hendrix. In 1966, the band played at a Mardi Gras in Fort Worth, Texas. After graduating from Cleburne High, Dacus left the band to record with another band, the Yellow Payges. Dacus's career began in the mid seventies, playing guitar on Chris Hillman's 1976 album, "Slippin' Away". He also worked on Crosby, Stills, and Nash's CSN album, doing background vocals and playing rhythm guitar. A few years later, he teamed up with Stephen Stills for several projects. OnStills Dacus has two writing credits, and on Illegal Stills he is featured prominently. In 1978, Dacus was cast as Woof, a supporting character in the movie Hair, and about the same time, jazz-rock band Chicago selected him as a replacement guitarist and vocalist after the death of Terry Kath. His debut with Chicago (Hot Streets) went to #12 and platinum, but not without controversy amongst the fans. After the Christmas tour of 1979, Dacus was replaced with Bill Champlin. In 1982 he resurfaced, joining Badfinger for a tour, and in the late 80s, he was involved in the Broadway musical Cats.

William Bradford "Bill" Champlin (born May 21, 1947, Oakland, California) is an American singer, guitarist, keyboard player, arranger, producer, and songwriter. His performance work is principally associated with the bands Chicago and the Sons of Champlin. He has won multiple Grammy Awards for songwriting. As a child, Champlin demonstrated a talent for piano, and eventually picked up the guitar after being inspired by Elvis Presley. He started a band, The Opposite Six, while at Tamalpais High School, in Mill Valley, California and went on to study music in college, but was encouraged by a professor to drop out of school and pursue music professionally. The Opposite Six, Champlin's band from high school, changed their name to the Sons of Champlin, and eventually recorded a number of well-reviewed but poorly-selling albums (including Loosen Up Naturally and Circle Filled With Love) by 1977, when the 30 year old Champlin moved to Los Angeles. In LA he began extensive studio session work. He was especially in demand for his singing, appearing on hundreds of recordings throughout the 1970s and 1980s. The National Association of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS) awarded Champlin the Most Valuable Player peer award for male background vocalists in 1980. Champlin won a Grammy Award for Best Rhythm and Blues Song in 1979 for co-writing the hit song "After The Love Has Gone" with Jay Graydon and David Foster (which was made popular by Earth, Wind & Fire) and a second Grammy Award for Best Rhythm and Blues Song in 1982 for co-writing the song "Turn Your Love Around" with Jay Graydon and Steve Lukather (which was made popular by George Benson). In 1979, Champlin was approached by the then-widely successful band REO Speedwagon to add background vocals on some of their songs, which appear on the album Nine Lives; this was the last album in which REO Speedwagon had a predominately hard rock edge. This work allowed Champlin to become acquainted with other in-demand session men such as Jay Graydon, David Foster, Steve Lukather (of Toto). Among other artists that he worked with were Al Jarreau, Boz Scaggs, The Tubes, and Lee Ritenour. He also appeared on Barry Manilow's 1982 EP, Oh, Julie!. David Foster produced two solo albums for Champlin: Single and Runaway. Both albums sold poorly but were promoted poorly by his record company. In the 1990s, Champlin released five more solo albums: No Wasted Moments, Burn Down the Night, Through It All, He Started to Sing, andMayday. The last was a live recording of songs from his career, and included musicians Greg Mathieson, Jerry Lopez, Eddie Garcia, Tom Saviano and Rochon Westmoreland. In 1997, Champlin revived the Sons of Champlin, with whom he continues to play live shows throughout the West Coast of the United States. In September 2008, Champlin released a new solo album No Place Left To Fall and a companion DVD in Japan on JVC/Victor. The record was produced by Champlin and Mark Eddinger, and featured musicians Bruce Gaitsch, George Hawkins, Jr., Billy Ward, Tamara Champlin, Will Champlin, and Eddinger, with guest appearances by Steve Lukather, Peter Cetera, Michael English, and Jerry Lopez. The record was released in Europe by Zinc Music in December 2008 and in the U.S. by DreamMakers Music in August 2009. In 2009 Bill Champlin and his wife Tamara wrote the lyrics to "Til You Believe", a pop ballad composed, arranged, and produced by the Italian-American composer, arranger, and producer Manuel De Peppe. The song is also performed by Bill and Tamara as a duet. In 1978, the day after Chicago guitarist Terry Kath died, Champlin received a call from someone connected to the group, suggesting that he audition to take Kath's place. Champlin turned down the offer, saying he could not fill that role. But in 1981, he collaborated with Chicago's drummer, Danny Seraphine, singing some backgrounds with Peter Cetera on a non-Chicago project. Seraphine and Champlin co-wrote a few songs, and Champlin was invited to sing one song ("Sonny Think Twice") as a guest vocalist on what would eventually become Chicago 16. Champlin suggested to Seraphine that David Foster might be a good choice as a producer for Chicago at that time.
Seraphine began a campaign to get Champlin into the group, despite some obstacles (Robert Lamm, initially jealous at the prospect of another keyboardist, said, "What the hell do we need him for?" and Kenny Loggins personally called Champlin, saying, "What are you doing? Those guys are over!"). Reluctant at first, especially after hearing that he would be singing "Colour My World" ("I never really liked that one much"), Champlin finally said, "Why not? I'll give it a year", and joined the band in 1981. In the meantime, he was the musical director for the television show Fridays and was featured singing several songs on 16, including "Bad Advice" and "Follow Me." 1984's Chicago 17 enhanced Champlin's presence in the group, when he wrote several songs ("Please Hold On" and "Remember the Feeling"), and sang (with Cetera) the hit single "Hard Habit to Break". In 1988, Champlin's voice appeared prominently on several major hit singles: "Look Away", "I Don't Wanna Live Without Your Love", and "You're Not Alone" from Chicago 19. That year he also sang the theme to the television show In the Heat of the Night. In 1990, Champlin wrote, produced, and sang lead on "Hearts in Trouble", a song for the movie soundtrack of Days of Thunder. Originally a solo song, the producers of the movie decided, for marketing purposes, that it be released under the name of Chicago; so the band's horn section added a brass arrangement to the track and subsequently it was released as a single. In the summer of 1990, Chicago launched their Hearts in Trouble Tour. By the early 1990s, Chicago's popularity began to wane (Chicago Twenty 1, featuring the Champlin-sung hit "Chasin' the Wind", sold poorly), and the band recorded Stone of Sisyphus, a project that remained unreleased until June 17, 2008, fifteen years after it was recorded. Champlin sings on the tracks "Mah Jongg", "Here With Me", "The Show Must Go On", and "Plaid." Champlin made major contributions to Chicago's big-band tribute Night & Day Big Band in 1995, and to both editions of their Christmas album (Chicago XXV: The Christmas Album, re-released with additional tracks as What's It Gonna Be, Santa?). He co-wrote four of the songs on the band's 2006 album Chicago XXX. One week after the U.S. release of the Champlin solo album No Place Left to Fall, Chicago and Champlin announced his formal departure from the group. Chicago's management released a statement saying "Bill Champlin is no longer in Chicago. He was a long time band member and we wish him all the best as he embarks on his new solo project, for which he’s worked long and hard." Meanwhile, Champlin's publicist released a statement saying, "After 28 years with Chicago, singer-songwriter-keyboardist Bill Champlin is parting ways with the classic jazz/rock band to focus once again on his solo career." As of 2010, Champlin resides in Nashville, Tennessee. Champlin has been married since 1982 to his second wife, singer/songwriter Tamara Champlin. The couple's only child, Will, graduated from the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts and is pursuing a career as a singer and songwriter. Champlin is also the father of three other children, born prior to his second marriage.

Jason Randolph Scheff (born April 16, 1962 in San Diego, California) is an American bassist, singer and songwriter. Since 1985 he has been the bassist and singer for the veteran pop-rock band Chicago. He is the oldest son of well-known session bassist Jerry Scheff, who toured for several years with Elvis Presley. His brothers Darin and Lauren Scheff are also professional songwriters. Scheff was a member of the Class of 1980 at San Diego's Point Loma High School and started his professional musical career in 1982 as a member of a Los Angeles based rock band named Keane (not to be confused with the British band of the same name). At age 23, Jason joined Chicago in mid-1985 when Peter Cetera left to pursue a solo career. His ability to closely duplicate Cetera's vocal parts on Chicago hits allowed the band to continue its touring/recording efforts without a hitch; he debuted on lead vocals on their 1986 hit single "Will You Still Love Me?" Besides performing the band's classic material, Scheff has composed several original songs for the band, including their 1989 Top 10 single "What Kind Of Man Would I Be?." Scheff also cowrote the song "Heart Of Mine" with Bobby Caldwell and Dennis Matkosky. The song became a big hit for Boz Scaggs in 1988, at least in the adult contemporary charts, anyway. It was included in the 1988 Boz Scaggs album "Other Roads". In 2005, Scheff and Chicago founding member Robert Lamm convinced the band to record Chicago XXX, their first collection of new material since 1991's Twenty 1. Scheff also enlisted Rascal Flatts vocalist/bassist Jay DeMarcus to serve as producer for the new album, which was released on March 21, 2006. Scheff co-wrote seven of the 12 songs on the CD. Scheff, along with co-writers Peter Wolf and Ina Wolf, wrote a song in the early 1990s called Bigger Than Elvis, for the album Chicago XXII. This song is about Jason Scheff's father, Jerry Scheff, and describes Jason's memories growing up watching his father play for Elvis Presley on TV (although he also played with Elvis Costello), and thinking that his father was the big star. "Elvis was just a guy in a suit," Jason said during the 2003 concert on A&E's Live by Request. The album however, was rejected by Warner Brothers in 1993, and sat unreleased until 2008 when Rhino released it as Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus. Scheff has also enjoyed some limited success as a solo artist, releasing a CD entitled Chauncy in 1996, as well as several duets released only in Japan. In late 2006, Scheff joined indie supergroup L.E.O. to create the album Alpacas Orgling, a tribute to Jeff Lynne and the Electric Light Orchestra. Alpacas Orgling was released in October 2006, to generally positive reviews. As of November 2007, Scheff began broadcasting his vocals and music work over the internet via Ustream.tv.

Tris Imboden (born Gregory Tristan Imboden on July 27, 1951) is the current drummer with Chicago. He replaced their original drummer Danny Seraphine following his dismissal in 1990. Prior to joining Chicago, as well as during his tenure with the band, Imboden has had a career as a studio session player. Among his studio work have been sessions for Neil Diamond, Kenny Loggins, Firefall, Richard Marx, Steve Vai, Roger Daltrey and Crosby, Stills & Nash. He has also toured as a drummer with Kenny Loggins, Al Jarreau, Firefall, Cock Robin and others. Imboden was one of the founding members of the band Honk in 1970. Imboden lives in Malibu, California and has a daughter named Jessica.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 09.24.10 @ 21:11pm


They will wait until most of the members are dead before they induct them just like they did with the Dave Clark Five.

Posted by Cathy on Sunday, 09.26.10 @ 12:00pm


The Top 5 of artists who started out fairly decent and then jumped the shark big time:

5) Kenny Rogers
4) Lenny Kravitz
3) UB 40
2) Sting
1) Chicago

If they'd left us then, before 1976 (you know what record I'm talking about), I wouldn't exactly object to their induction. But as it is, they should be rather put under quarantine.

Posted by Rob Fleming on Sunday, 09.26.10 @ 17:56pm


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will remain incomplete without this classic rock band.
Incredible brass influenced sound, mega hits, and over 40 years of staying power. What more do the Hall voters need??

Posted by John K on Tuesday, 09.28.10 @ 16:05pm


The band is still fantastic.Magnificent musicians and in te sixties years, they played a strong rock 'roll. Songs like "I'm a man", "Make me smile", "25 or 68", "Free", "Beginnings" and many , many others show it.Chicago should have been in years ago. Five different lead singers. The horns, oh lord...fantastic,mixed with guitar, arrangements...James Pankow- God blees you.Please include them now.


Posted by jose gaspar Ramos on Tuesday, 09.28.10 @ 21:42pm


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will always be a joke until Chicago and the Doobie Brothers get in. They became eligible in 1994 and 1996, respectively. Unbelieveable to me....

Posted by Jeff on Wednesday, 09.29.10 @ 11:39am


http://www.startribune.com/entertainment/blogs/103985778.html

Jon Bream dissing Chicago!!

Chic had a few big disco hits but they don’t deserve to be in the hall anymore than Chicago, which isn’t on the ballot.

-Jon Bream

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.29.10 @ 16:29pm


Jon Bream dissing Chicago!!

Chic had a few big disco hits but they don’t deserve to be in the hall anymore than Chicago, which isn’t on the ballot.

-Jon Bream

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.29.10 @ 16:29pm

Wait, that was a compliment!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 09.29.10 @ 21:44pm


CHICAGO BAND MEMBERS WHO CAN BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: vocals; guitar)
10. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
11. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

CHICAGO BAND MEMBERS WHO WILL BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
09. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

CHICAGO BAND MEMBERS WHO MIGHT BE INDUCTED

01. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
02. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: vocals; guitar)
03. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

CHICAGO BAND MEMBERS WHO CAN'T BE INDUCTED

01. Chris Pinnick (1980-1984: guitar)
02. Dawayne Bailey (1986-1994: guitar)
03. Keith Howland (1995-present: guitar)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 10.2.10 @ 05:58am


The Dave Clark Five only had one horn player, not three. The Beatles, The Doors and The Zombies didn't have any horn players in their groups. They used outside musicians. Same goes for James Brown. Chicago had three full blown members of the band who were horn players. That`s the difference!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.3.10 @ 20:38pm


http://board.petercetera.com/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=6333

A hypothetical conversation between Peter Cetera & Phil Collins.

Peter : " Hey Phil, how are you doing ?"
Phil : " Great Peter, and yourself?"
Peter : " Doing great. I have a symphony gig going on, an electric band of "Bad Daddies" too
and I'm also going on tour with my old buddy David Foster and friends."
Phil : " I'm still hanging out with my chaps from Genesis and I'm also doing the solo thing
and releasing some solo work CD's."
Peter : "Wait a minute..... you mean you STILL play with the guys in Genesis AND they
give you an opportunity to release solo stuff? Wow, how cool that would be.
I wish I knew some understanding guys like your boys in Genesis."
Phil : "Hey Peter , not to change the subject but I was thinking... maybe you and me
should remake my hit song "Easy Lover". You remember that tune don't you?
It was my duet with Phillip Bailey from Earth Wind & Fire."
Peter: "Yeah , great song. Besides, I owe Phillip Bailey one since he sang "If You Leave
Me Now" for 2 years while touring with my old mates. That song is my baby, my first # 1 hit!"
Phil : " Great. I'll have my people talk to your people and maybe we can set something up."
Peter : "Sounds great. Nice seeing you again Phil. Say hello to the guys in Genesis for me."
Phil: " Great seeing you again Peter. Say hello to the guys..... what the hell am I saying? Take care."

Posted by 6996 on Sunday, 10.3.10 @ 20:53pm


A CHICAGO CONSPIRACY THEORY

FIRST, BARACK OBAMA, A BLACK CHICAGO POLITICIAN FROM HAWAII, BORN IN 1961, IS ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN 2008. THEN WITH THE HELP OF BARACK OBAMA, THE CITY OF CHICAGO GOT IN THE BIDDING FOR HOSTING THE 2016 OLYMPICS AND THEY LOST. THEN IN 2010 THE NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE'S CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS WIN THEIR FOURTH STANLEY CUP IN FRANCHISE HISTORY, BUT THEIR FIRST SINCE 1961, THE YEAR OF BARACK OBAMA'S BIRTH. THEN PETER CETERA GAVE THE SONGWRITERS HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR DAVID FOSTER IN 2010. THEN CHICAGO THE BAND IS INDUCTED INTO THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME SOMETIME DURING BARACK OBAMA'S EIGHT YEARS/TWO TERMS AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (2008-2017).

BARACK OBAMA IS BLACK AND HE IS FROM CHICAGO.
THE CHICAGO NHL TEAM IS CALLED THE BLACKHAWKS.
CHICAGO THE BAND PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BLACK PEOPLE.

IN 2010, DUSTIN BYFUGLIEN (PRONOUNCED BUFFLIN) BECAME THE FIRST BLACK GOAL SCORER AND FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN IN NHL HISTORY TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT DURING A BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENCY. GRANT FUHR WAS THE FIRST BLACK GOALTENDER AND FIRST BLACK HOCKEY PLAYER PERIOD TO WIN THE STANLEY CUP AND HE DID IT FIVE TIMES WITH THE EDMONTON OILERS BETWEEN 1984 AND 1990, BUT GRANT FUHR WAS CANADIAN. WAYNE GRETZKY, WHO WAS GRANT FUHR'S TEAMMATE ON THE EDMONTON OILERS, WAS BORN IN 1961, THE SAME YEAR AS BARACK OBAMA, AND WHEN WAYNE GRETZKY RETIRED IN 1999 HE HELD 61 NHL RECORDS. JOHN F. KENNEDY WAS ASSASSINATED IN 1963. WAYNE GRETZKY WORE THE NUMBER 99 ON HIS JERSEY. WHEN WAYNE GRETZKY RETIRED IN 1999 HE HAD 1,963 CAREER ASSISTS IN REGULAR SEASON NHL PLAY. JOHN F. KENNEDY JR. DIED IN A PLANE CRASH IN 1999, THE SAME YEAR THAT WAYNE GRETZKY RETIRED WITH 1,963 CAREER ASSISTS IN REGULAR SEASON NHL PLAY, THE SAME NUMBER AS THE YEAR OF JOHN F. KENNEDY'S ASSASSINATION. JOHN F. KENNEDY JR. DIED ON JULY 16, 1999, ONE DAY BEFORE THE ELEVEN YEAR WEDDING ANNIVERSARY OF WAYNE GRETZKY AND JANET JONES.

The Chicago Blackhawks have won the Stanley Cup during a Barack Obama presidency, and now Chicago the band will be inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame sometime between 2011 and 2017!!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 10.5.10 @ 05:20am


THE TOP 5 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART AND THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART:

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Bee Gees

INDUCT CHICAGO ALREADY!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 06:49am


For, I don't know, the 167th time, chart success is not a major factor in terms of induction. :-) A number of inductees have had it, but that was gravy for them. (Not sure where that list is from, anyhow, as Billboard hasn't had a list- at least in recent times- combining albums and singles performance).

I'm telling you that Chicago's slick, 80s-on material may have left a bad taste in the mouths of HOF committee members, so don't continue to be surprised to see the committee snub the group.

Posted by JR on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 06:53am


(Not sure where that list is from, anyhow, as Billboard hasn't had a list- at least in recent times- combining albums and singles performance).

Posted by JR on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 06:53am

The albums list and the singles list are the same for all five bands. That is why I listed them just once. You should buy the next editions of the Billboard 200 Albums book and the Billboard 100 Singles book. That is two books. Read the back pages for yourself and see all the statistics.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 11:00am


Here, I will make it easier on you:

THE TOP 5 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Bee Gees

THE TOP 5 CHARTING ROCK AND ROLL BANDS OF ALL TIME ON THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. The Beatles
02. The Rolling Stones
03. The Beach Boys
04. Chicago
05. The Bee Gees

Is that better?

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 11:04am


According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American rock band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. Judged by album sales, as certified by the R.I.A.A., the band does not rank quite so high, but it is still among the Top Ten best-selling U.S. groups ever. If such statements of fact surprise, that's because Chicago has been singularly underrated since the beginning of its long career, both because of its musical ambitions (to the musicians, rock is only one of several styles of music to be used and blended, along with classical, jazz, R&B, and pop) and because of its refusal to emphasize celebrity over the music. The result has been that fundamentalist rock critics have consistently failed to appreciate its music and that its media profile has always been low. At the same time, however, Chicago has succeeded in the ways it intended to. From the beginning of its emergence as a national act, it has been able to fill arenas with satisfied fans. And beyond the impressive sales and chart statistics, its music has endured, played constantly on the radio and instantly familiar to tens of millions. When, in 2002, Chicago's biggest hits were assembled together on the two-disc set The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning and the album debuted in the Top 50, giving the band the distinction of having had chart albums in five consecutive decades, the music industry and some music journalists may have been startled. But the fans who had been supporting Chicago for over 30 years were not.

Chicago marked the confluence of two distinct, but intermingling musical strains in Chicago, IL, in the mid-'60s: an academic approach and one coming from the streets. Reed player Walter Parazaider (born March 14, 1945, in Chicago, IL), trumpeter Lee Loughnane (born October 21, 1946, in Chicago, IL), and trombonist James Pankow (born August 20, 1947, in St. Louis, MO) were all music students at DePaul University. But they moonlighted in the city's clubs, playing everything from R&B to Irish music, and there they encountered less formally educated but no less talented players like guitarist Terry Kath (born January 31, 1946, in Chicago, IL; died January 23, 1978, in Los Angeles, CA) and drummer Danny Seraphine (born August 28, 1948, in Chicago, IL). In the mid-'60s, most rock groups followed the instrumentation of the Beatles -- two guitars, bass, and drums -- and horn sections were heard only in R&B. But in the summer of 1966, the Beatles used horns on "Got to Get You into My Life" on their Revolver album and, as usual, pop music began to follow their lead. At the end of the year, the Buckinghams, a Chicago band guided by a friend of Parazaider's, James William Guercio, scored a national hit with the horn-filled "Kind of a Drag," which went on to hit number one in February 1967.

That was all the encouragement Parazaider and his friends needed. Parazaider called a meeting of the band-to-be at his apartment on February 15, 1967, inviting along a talented organist and singer he had run across, Robert Lamm (born October 13, 1944, in New York, NY [Brooklyn]). Lamm agreed to join and also said he could supply the missing bass sounds to the ensemble using the organ's foot pedals (a skill he had not actually acquired at the time).

Developing a repertoire of James Brown and Wilson Pickett material, the new band rehearsed in Parazaider's parents' basement before beginning to get gigs around town under the name the Big Thing. Soon, they were playing around the Midwest. By this time, Guercio had become a staff producer at Columbia Records, and he encouraged the band to begin developing original songs. Kath, and especially Lamm, took up the suggestion. (Soon, Pankow also became a major writer for the band.) Meanwhile, the sextet became a septet when Peter Cetera (born September 13, 1944, in Chicago, IL), singer and bassist for a rival Midwest band, the Exceptions, agreed to defect and join the Big Thing. This gave the group the unusual versatility of having three lead singers, the smooth baritone Lamm, the gruff baritone Kath, and Cetera, who was an elastic tenor. When Guercio came back to see the group in the late winter of 1968, he deemed them ready for the next step. In June 1968, he financed their move to Los Angeles.

Guercio exerted a powerful influence on the band as its manager and producer, which would become a problem over time. At first, the bandmembers were willing to live together in a two-bedroom house, practice all the time, and change the group's name to one of Guercio's choosing, Chicago Transit Authority. Guercio's growing power at Columbia Records enabled him to get the band signed there and to set in place the unusual image the band would have. He convinced the label to let this neophyte band release a double album as its debut (that is, when they agreed to a cut in their royalties), and he decided the group would be represented on the cover by a logo instead of a photograph.

Chicago Transit Authority, released in April 1969, debuted on the charts in May as the band began touring nationally. By July, the album had reached the Top 20, without benefit of a hit single. It had been taken up by the free-form FM rock stations and become an underground hit. It was certified gold by the end of the year and eventually went on to sell more than two million copies. (In September 1969, the band played the Toronto Rock 'n' Roll Festival, and somehow the promoter obtained the right to tape the show. That same low-fidelity tape has turned up in an endless series of albums ever since. Examples include: Anthology, Beat the Bootleggers: Live 1967, Beginnings, Beginnings Live, Chicago [Classic World], Chicago Live, Chicago Transit Authority: Live in Concert [Magnum], Chicago Transit Authority: Live in Concert [Onyx], Great Chicago in Concert, I'm a Man, In Concert [Digmode], In Concert [Pilz], Live! [Columbia River], Live [LaserLight], Live Chicago, Live in Concert, Live in Toronto, Live '69, Live 25 or 6 to 4, The Masters, Rock in Toronto, and Toronto Rock 'n' Roll Revival.) To Guercio's surprise, he was contacted by the real Chicago Transit Authority, which objected to the band's use of the name; he responded by shortening the name to simply "Chicago." When he and the group finished the second album (another double) for release at the start of 1970, it was called Chicago, though it has since become known as Chicago II.

Chicago II vaulted into the Top Ten in its second week on the Billboard chart, even before its first single, "Make Me Smile," hit the Hot 100. The single was an excerpt from a musical suite, and the band at first objected to the editing considered necessary to prepare it for AM radio play. But it went on to reach the Top Ten, as did its successor, "25 or 6 to 4." The album quickly went gold and eventually platinum. In the fall of 1970, Columbia Records released "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," drawn from the group's first album, as its next single; it gave them their third consecutive Top Ten hit.

Chicago III, another double album, was ready for release at the start of 1971, and it just missed hitting number one while giving the band a third gold (and later platinum) LP. Its singles did not reach the Top Ten, however, and Columbia again reached back, releasing "Beginnings" (from the first album) backed with "Colour My World" (from the second) to give Chicago its fourth Top Ten single. Next up was a live album, the four-disc box set Chicago at Carnegie Hall, which, despite its size, crested in the Top Five and sold over a million copies. (The band itself preferred Live in Japan, an album recorded in February 1972 and initially released only in Japan.) Chicago V, a one-LP set, released in July 1972, spent nine weeks at number one on its way to selling over two million copies, spurred by its gold-selling Top Ten hit "Saturday in the Park." Chicago VI followed a year later and repeated the same success, launching the Top Ten singles "Feelin' Stronger Every Day" and "Just You 'n' Me."

The next Top Ten hit, "(I've Been) Searchin' So Long," was released in advance of Chicago VII in the late winter of 1974. The album was the band's third consecutive chart-topper and another million-seller. "Call on Me" became its second Top Ten single. Chicago VIII, which marked the promotion of sideman percussionist Laudir de Oliveira as a full-fledged bandmember, appeared in the spring of 1975, spawned the Top Ten hit "Old Days," and became the band's fourth consecutive number one LP. After the profit-taking Chicago IX: Chicago's Greatest Hits in the fall of 1975 came Chicago X, which missed hitting number one but eventually sold over two million copies, in part because of the inclusion of the Grammy-winning number one single "If You Leave Me Now." Chicago XI, released in the late summer of 1977, continued the seemingly endless string of success, reaching the Top Ten, selling a million copies, and generating the Top Five hit "Baby, What a Big Surprise."

But there was trouble beneath the surface. The band's big hits were starting to be solely ballads sung by Cetera, which frustrated the musicians' musical ambitions. They had failed to attract critical notice, and what press attention they were given often alluded to Guercio's Svengali-like control as manager and producer. Chicago determined to fire Guercio and demonstrate that they could succeed without him. Shortly afterward, they were struck by a crushing blow. Kath, a gun enthusiast, accidentally shot and killed himself on January 23, 1978. Though he, like most of the other members of the band, was not readily recognizable outside the group, he had actually had a large say in its direction, and his loss was incalculable. Nevertheless, the band closed ranks and went on.

Guitarist Donnie Dacus was chosen from auditions and joined the band in time for its 12th LP release, which was given a non-numerical title, Hot Streets, and which put prominent pictures of the bandmembers on the cover for the first time. The sound, as indicated by the first single, the Top 20 hit "Alive Again," was harder rock, and the band's core following responded, but Hot Streets was Chicago's first album since 1969 to miss the Top Ten. Chicago 13 then missed the Top 20. (At this point, Dacus left the band, and Chicago hired guitarist Chris Pinnick as a sideman, eventually upping him to full-fledged group-member status.) Released in 1980, Chicago XIV, the last album to feature de Oliveira, didn't go gold. By 1981, with the release of the 15th album, the poor-selling Greatest Hits, Vol. 2, the band parted ways with Columbia Records and began looking for a new approach.

They found it in writer/producer David Foster, who returned to an emphasis on the band's talent for power ballads as sung by Cetera. They also brought in one of Foster's favorite session musicians, Bill Champlin (born May 21, 1947, in Oakland, CA), as a full-fledged bandmember. Champlin, formerly the leader of the Sons of Champlin, was a multi-instrumentalist with a gruff voice that allowed him to sing the parts previously taken by Kath. With these additions, the band signed with Full Moon Records, an imprint of Warner Bros., and released Chicago 16 in the spring of 1982, prefaced by the single "Hard to Say I'm Sorry," which topped the charts, leading to a major comeback. The album returned Chicago to million-selling, Top Ten status. Chicago 17, released in the spring of 1984, was even more successful -- in fact, the biggest-selling album of the band's career, with platinum certifications for six million copies as of 1997. It spawned two Top Five hits, "Hard Habit to Break" and "You're the Inspiration."

The renewed success, however, changed the long-established group dynamics, thrusting Cetera out as a star. He left the band for a solo career in 1985. (Pinnick also left at about this time, and the band did not immediately bring in a new guitarist.) As Cetera's replacement, Chicago found Jason Scheff, the 23-year-old bass-playing son of famed bassist Jerry Scheff, a longtime sideman with Elvis Presley. Scheff boasted a tenor voice that allowed him to re-create Cetera's singing on many Chicago hits. The split with Cetera had a negative commercial impact, however. Despite boasting a Top Five hit single in "Will You Still Love Me?," 1986's Chicago 18 only went gold. The band recovered, however, with Chicago 19, released in the spring of 1988. Among its singles, "I Don't Want to Live Without Your Love" made the Top Five, "Look Away" topped the charts, and "You're Not Alone" made the Top Ten as the album went platinum. Another single, "What Kind of Man Would I Be?," originally found on the album, was included as part of the 1989 compilation Greatest Hits 1982-1989 (which counted as the 20th album) and became a Top Five hit, while the album sold five million copies by 1997.

At the turn of the decade, Chicago underwent two more personnel changes, with guitarist DaWayne Bailey joining and original drummer Danny Seraphine departing, to be replaced by Tris Imboden. Chicago Twenty 1, released at the start of 1991, sold disappointingly, and Warner rejected the band's next offering (though tracks from it did turn up on compilations). Chicago, however, maintained a loyal following that enabled them to tour successfully every summer. In 1995, Keith Howland replaced Bailey as Chicago's guitarist. The same year, the band regained rights to its Columbia Records catalog and established its own Chicago Records label to reissue the albums. They also signed to Giant Records, another Warner imprint, to release their 22nd album, Night & Day, a collection of big-band standards that made the Top 100. They were now able to combine hits from their Columbia and Warner years, resulting in the release of the gold-selling The Heart of Chicago 1967-1997 and its follow-up, The Heart of Chicago, Vol. 2 1967-1998 (their 23rd and 24th albums, respectively). In 1998, they released Chicago 25: The Christmas Album on Chicago Records, and they followed it in 1999 with Chicago XXVI: The Live Album. In 2002, Chicago began leasing its early albums to Rhino Records for deluxe repackagings, often with bonus tracks. And the success of The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning demonstrated that their music continued to appeal to fans. Feeding off the renewed interest, the band reappeared in 2006 with the new album Chicago XXX on Rhino. The rejected Warner album from 1993 was finally released by Rhino in 2008 as Stone of Sisyphus: XXXII.

by William Ruhlmann - All Music Guide

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 10.10.10 @ 18:50pm


Unfortunately, those who think of Chicago in terms of Hard Habit To Break and You're the Inspiration have the musical scope of vision akin to a bat in the daytime.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.11.10 @ 14:10pm


Number of posts: 489
Number of posts by Roy: 191 (and counting)
Number of posts by Roy in the past year: an even 100.
Number of times Roy has made 4 or more consecutive posts: 6

Posted by Teller on Monday, 10.11.10 @ 14:44pm


http://www.notinhalloffame.com/register.php?activate=5c32d0fa35831ac65a67ba3ac537876c

20. Chicago

Had we done this list with the criteria of chart success, Chicago would have easily been in our top ten. Having charted over multiple decades, Chicago has enjoyed a devoted following that few on this list can match. One has to wonder if the band was a little flashier, and the fans a little louder if it would not come as such a great shock as to the average music fan as to just how successful they were.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 10.12.10 @ 17:29pm


While the snubbing of all-time great artists like Yes, Rush, and the Moody Blues, not to mention artists not even mentioned here like the Doobie Brothers, is incredible, the most outrageous omission is Chicago. True, although they were the most popular American band in the 70's and had continued success in the 80's, and "popularity" is not supposed to factor into the RnRHOF equation (allegedly), Chicago was innovative with their unique blend of rock, jazz, r&b and pop fuled by the greatest horn section in history. Not influential? Any musician who lived through Chicago's prime 70's era knows differntly, as numerous musicians who went on to pursue their craft and "perpetuate" the genre of rock music were inspired and influenced by this amazing band of seven incredible pro musicians/ singers. Oh, I forgot. The clowns that vote for this Hall of Fame sham are writers, not musicians.

Posted by tac239 on Friday, 10.15.10 @ 19:21pm


http://www.amazon.com/Street-Player-My-Chicago-Story/dp/0470416831/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1287538530&sr=1-1

Street Player: My Chicago Story
Danny Seraphine

Product Description

The inside story of Chicago, one of the most successful and enduring rock bands ever.

With their distinctive blending of soulful rock and horn-infused urban jazz, Chicago has thrilled music fans for more than forty years with their lyrical brilliance. In this no-holds-barred memoir, legendary rocker Danny Seraphine shares his dramatic—and often shocking—experiences as the popular supergroup's cofounder and longtime drummer. He reveals behind-the-scenes anecdotes about Chicago’s beginnings as the house band at Los Angeles's legendary Whisky A Go Go, where they were discovered by music icons Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix, and personal insights about the group’s many comebacks and reinventions over the years.

Offers a lively inside account of the music and history of the perennially popular band Chicago, one of the most successful American bands ever with over 122 million albums sold, by the band’s cofounder and longtime drummer Danny Seraphine.
Includes riveting tales and rare photographs from Seraphine's time on the road touring with performers including Dennis and Carl Wilson of the Beach Boys, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Bruce Springsteen. Candidly tackles many rumors about Chicago, including Mafia ties, accounting and payola scandals, and major drug abuse
Discusses the mysterious circumstances surrounding Seraphine's 1990 firing from the band as well as his comeback with his critically acclaimed new band, California Transit Authority.

Whether you're a diehard Chicago fan or just love a well-told rock-and-roll memoir, Street Player will entertain and surprise you.

From the Inside Flap

In Street Player, legendary drummer Danny Seraphine, a founding member of the iconic band Chicago, tells the dramatic story of his rise from the very mean streets of Chicago to the pinnacle of rock fame and fortune in the 1960s, a watershed period in music history. In this riveting book, Seraphine offers vivid portraits of his fellow band members and reveals how Chicago differs from all other bands and why they have captured the hearts of millions of fans worldwide.

This lively inside story is filled with fascinating and colorful tales from Seraphine's time on the road. He recalls how his first meeting with Janis Joplin nearly turned into a fist fight (and how she sweetly apologized afterward), why Jimi Hendrix invited Chicago to tour with him, and how Hendrix, a former paratrooper, calmly reassured him during a very turbulent flight. He talks about touring with the Beach Boys, Bruce Springsteen, Led Zeppelin, and other music legends. Seraphine's tales of learning and perfecting his craft, and of how he pushed his and the band's art to their limits and beyond, are told with an unforgettable passion and urgency.

Seraphine shares moving and heartfelt stories of his life. For example, in the winter of 1965, as a high school dropout, he stood alone in his mother's kitchen wondering what had happened to his dream. He had thought he would be a professional drummer by then, basking in the roar of applause and well on his way to a brilliant career. Instead, he could hear only echoes of the shotgun blast that nearly took his life the night before. He imagined a pointless future of street fights and felonies in which the best he could hope for was a low-level position in the Chicago Mafia. Knowing there was no way out, he was close to despair. Then the phone rang; the rest is music history.

And in this book, for the first time, Seraphine tells the painful story, from the heart, of close friend and cofounder Terry Kath's death and of Seraphine's traumatic 1990 firing from the band and the pain that he has only recently overcome.

Complete with dozens of photos from Chicago's early years, Street Player is an uncommonly powerful rock memoir that is easy to pick up and very hard to put down.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 10.19.10 @ 19:51pm


According to Billboard Magazine's Hot 50th Anniversary Top 100 artists, Chicago is now tops among all the American bands, at 13.

Among the bands or groups, only the Bee Gees, Paul McCartney & Wings, Rolling Stones and The Bealtes are ahead of them.

These guys still rule!!!

Posted by Larry Launstein Jr on Friday, 10.29.10 @ 14:33pm


The Rock Hall may feel the need to induct Blood, Sweat & Tears before inducting Chicago. They may have them on the same ballot the way they have done with Donna Summer and Chic twice already. They might even induct Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears in the same year, the same way they inducted The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac in the same year (1998).

Posted by Roy on Monday, 11.8.10 @ 00:40am


Not much I can add here other than to say that Chicago pretty much dominated either rock or adult contemporary radio for large parts of the late 60's, going into the early 90's. To have that type of longevity, albeit without the critical respect of The Stones and the like, and to put out quality material with great musicianship makes them a more than deserving choice. I wasn't aware of the Jann Wenner grudge issue, and that may well keep them out, but taken song for song, hit for hit, decade by decade, this is a no brainer!

Posted by David Balzano on Saturday, 11.13.10 @ 08:33am


QUOTES FROM CHICAGO: VH1 BEHIND THE MUSIC

The most famous logo in Rock and Roll.

A Rock and Roll band with a horn section.

A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music.

A rock group whose horn section formed the heart of the band.

The horn section was another lead voice dancing with the vocals.

A horn centered rock group.

We were brash enough to say, well let's be The Beatles with horns.

-Walter Parazaider

There would be not photos of the 7 faces in the band on Chicago's album covers. The group would come to be identified by a logo.

Listen, in a lot of respects the group might resent me for it, but I wanted to market it in a certain way.

-James William Guercio

Chicago's rock and roll soul was Terry Kath. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll.

At first CTA's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was.

They actually interspersed horns with rock and roll and that was not commonplace at that point.

Jimi Hendrix told me, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away."

-James William Guercio

I felt somebody tap me on the back and I turned around and it's Jimi Hendrix staring me in the face. He say I got to tell you your guitar player is way better than me, and he says the horns are like one set of lungs, and I'm sitting there like okay someone slip me acid.

-Walter Parazaider

I felt that this music had an impact on the youth of the world and could break down barriers.

-James William Guercio

Guercio had a global view and I can't say he was totally wrong, but the way he was going about it was just really destructive.

-Robert Lamm

Chicago had a new look but their sound still met with resistence. Their second album got little radio play and concerned CBS executives turned to Guercio.

Give me something to go to radio with. All these tracks are 10 to 12 minutes long. We edited a number of these records and I think Clive got really involved.

-James William Guercio

We absolutely worked all the edits to shape all the songs to fit into the song length at the time.

-Clive Davis

Guercio and Davis made Chicago's songs shorter and more radio friendly.

We were all pretty pissed off about it because oh how dare they cut up our music, you know, because we were artists.

-Danny Seraphine

Chicago was highly critical of the butchering of their material and I agreed with them actually, but it was a compromise to be on the radio.

-James William Guercio

For the 7 serious musicians in the band chart success came with a price.

It became this machine. It was calculated that we were going to stop being a band that played arrangements and become more song oriented.

-Danny Seraphine

I noticed and Terry Kath noticed that the music we were recording was not as experimental as previous albums had been. I was uncomfortable with it because I didn't want to just do that.

-Robert Lamm

I would rather fail with an album that we really want to do than have a mega hit of crap. It's really a shocking thing to have been once considered avant-garde and now be dismissed as wimpy.

-Robert Lamm

A label said if you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you. It's like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano.

-James Pankow

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.20.10 @ 02:02am


We get it roy, they have horns.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 11.20.10 @ 09:44am


I can understand (trying to be objective) why they might struggle with Chicago, Yes, Journey, and the Doobies – WHICH members get inducted? For example, the current members of Chicago haven't contributed much beyond be "replacements", but are considered "official" members. Past Chicago member Bill Champlin certainly deserves to be inducted, because he brought something original to the band. But does Jason Scheff, Peter Cetera's replacement? He sang on a couple minor hits, and did nothing to innovate.

Posted by Vince on Monday, 11.22.10 @ 06:41am


To Vince

The difference between the replacement singers in Journey (Steve Augeri for Steve Perry) and Styx (Lawrence Gowan for Dennis DeYoung)and the replacement singer in Chicago (Jason Scheff for Peter Cetera), is that the replacement singers in Journey and Styx arrived very, very, very late into the game, the late 1990s and early 2000s to be exact and they never had any hits with those singers played on the radio. Augeri and Gowan will not be inducted, and they shouldn't be inducted.

Jason Scheff on the other hand has been with Chicago since 1985 (25 years) and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums and there is more to come. Jason Scheff sang lead on two Top 5 Chicago hits: Will You Still Love Me? (1986) and What Kind Of Man Would I Be? (1989). Songs that are still heavily played on radio. It would look very odd if the replacement for Peter Cetera was not inducted into the Rock Hall with the rest of Chicago. He's a big part of the story.

The appropriate comparison would be Jason Scheff to Sammy Hagar. Sammy Hagar replaced David Lee Roth in Van Halen in 1985, the same year that Jason Scheff replaced Peter Cetera in Chicago. Sammy Hagar was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with Van Halen. Jason Scheff will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with Chicago.

The Rock Hall inducted 12 members of The Grateful Dead and 16 members of Parliament-Funkadelic. I'm pretty sure they can handle 10 or 12 members of Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 08:10am


Chicago

1982. Love Me Tomorrow
1986. Will You Still Love Me?

Put them together and you get:

The Shirelles

1961. Will You Love Me Tomorrow

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 08:53am


I'm just double posting the way Roy does!

Hey Roy, here's one for you...

In recent years, Van Halen has toured with both David Lee Roth and Sammy Hagar together at the same time. David Lee Roth and Sammy Hagar have also toured together without the rest of Van Halen.

Chicago has yet to tour with both Peter Cetera and Jason Scheff together at the same time. Peter Cetera and Jason Scheff have not toured together without the rest of Chicago.

Posted by 6996 on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 09:11am


Chicago is the biggest Rock Hall snub ever!

Posted by Airport Hospital on Tuesday, 11.30.10 @ 13:26pm


"Chicago is the biggest Rock Hall snub ever!"

Not really.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 12.1.10 @ 16:48pm


Jazz-Rock-Rhythm and Blues Fusion

01. Chicago
02. Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. The Blues Project
04. Sly & The Family Stone
05. Earth, Wind & Fire
06. Kool & The Gang
07. The Commodores
08. Tower Of Power
09. Ten Wheel Drive
10. Weather Report
11. Electric Flag
12. Lighthouse
13. Chase

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 12.12.10 @ 08:00am


Jazz-Rock-Rhythm and Blues Fusion

01. Chicago
02. Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. The Blues Project
04. Sly & The Family Stone
05. Earth, Wind & Fire
06. Kool & The Gang
07. The Commodores
08. Tower Of Power
09. Ten Wheel Drive
10. Weather Report
11. Electric Flag
12. The Ides Of March
13. Lighthouse
14. Chase

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 12.12.10 @ 08:03am


My Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago is coming this week! For real this time.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 12.14.10 @ 19:26pm


The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees Who Will Be Voting For Chicago When They Get Nominated:

The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Led Zeppelin, The Isley Brothers, The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills and Nash, The Jackson Five, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, Santana, The Lovin' Spoonful, The (Young) Rascals, Earth, Wind & Fire, Aerosmith, Queen, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Talking Heads, The Ramones, AC/DC, The Clash, The Police, Traffic, ZZ Top, Elvis Costello & The Attractions, U2, The Pretenders, The O'Jays, Blondie, Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Van Halen, R.E.M., Metallica, ABBA, Genesis, The Hollies, The Stooges, Alice Cooper, Neil Diamond, Jeff Beck, John Mellencamp, Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, Madonna, Paul Simon, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Neil Young, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen, Joni Mitchell, David Bowie, Rod Stewart, Elton John, Billy Joel

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 12.18.10 @ 05:13am


And how exactly did you figure this out?

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 12.18.10 @ 05:44am


And how exactly did you figure this out?

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 12.18.10 @ 05:44am

The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees Who Will Be Voting For Chicago When They Get Nominated:

The Beach Boys, Led Zeppelin, Santana, The Animals, The Lovin' Spoonful, Earth, Wind & Fire, and Bruce Springsteen because they toured with Chicago

The Beach Boys and The Bee Gees because they have performed on Chicago albums, and Chicago has performed on their albums. They are friends.

Chicago has performed on Elton John albums

Peter Cetera performed on Billy Joel's My Life

Peter Cetera has worked with members of ABBA and Pink Floyd

Artists who will be voting for Chicago out of respect for a band from their time period:

The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills and Nash, The Jackson Five, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, The (Young) Rascals, Queen, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Talking Heads, The Ramones, AC/DC, The Clash, The Police, Traffic, ZZ Top, Elvis Costello & The Attractions, The Pretenders, The O'Jays, Blondie, Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Genesis, The Hollies, The Stooges, Alice Cooper, Neil Diamond, Jeff Beck, Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, Paul Simon, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Neil Young, James Taylor, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, David Bowie, Rod Stewart, Elton John

Van Halen, R.E.M., U2, John Mellencamp, Madonna and Metallica are fans of Chicago

The Isley Brothers because they did a remake of Chicago's If You Leave Me Now

Posted by Roy on Friday, 12.24.10 @ 03:48am


Chicago Where and are a magnificent band !

Jimi Hendrix rated the Late Great Terry Kath as a phenominal guitarist.

later guitarists like Donnie Dacus (also in Steve Stills band), Chris Pinnick, DaWayne Bailey & now Keith howland are all tremendous axemen as well....not forgetting friends like Michael Landau & Toto's Steve Lukather who guested with the band.

Robert Lamm is a tremendous songwriter.

Peter Cetera a memorable Lead vocalist and girted songwriter too.

The Brass section of Jimmy Pankow, Lee Loughnane & Walter Parazaider are instantly recognisable...

Danny Seraphene was a brilliant Drummer

Later recruits such as Bill Champlin & Jason Scheff (son of Elvis' Bass player Jerry) duly added their own distinctive input in songs, playing & vocalising, making them a part of the band's history as well.

The band let their music do the talking for them, being one of the most professional outfits in a tremendously long career selling zillions of records....

they recorded in many differing styles, from Jazz-Rock, Jazz, Rock, Pop ballads, etc....ranging from Improvisational long pieces, Protest songs, social comment songs,to short memorable love songs and funkier type items etc...

there is 'something for everyone' in Chicago's back catalogue...if people put aside prejudices & just.... 'Listen'

add to that their great Charity work, their work for young aspiring Musicians, work to promote both their city & country, their work on fellow artists records, their sheer scale of records & concert tickets sold worldwide, together with tremendous creative output in a career stretching back to the mid sixties as 'Chicago Transit Authority' ....

...and their continued omission from the hall of Fame seems Laughable if it were not so utterly embarressing...
(rather like those pompous Hollywood film bods 'forgetting' to give Iconic Actors like say John Wayne and Henry Fonda etc, an Oscar for many years eh ?)

The Hall of Fame committee should wake up....!

Posted by Rob on Friday, 12.24.10 @ 12:49pm


Chicago is a shoe-in for the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame! They will be inducted the first year they get nominated!

Madonna also sang with Peter Cetera on his 1988 song Scheherazade from his 1988 One More Story album.


NON-PERFORMER CATEGORY INDUCTEES WHO WILL BE VOTING FOR CHICAGO:

Berry Gordy, Jr, Gerry Goffin and Carole King, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Dick Clark, George Martin, Clive Davis, Mo Ostin, Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, David Geffen, Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry


LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT INDUCTEES WHO WILL VOTE FOR CHICAGO:

John Hammond, Seymour Stein, Herb Alpert and Jerry Moss

Posted by Roy on Friday, 12.24.10 @ 12:58pm


"The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills and Nash, The Jackson Five, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, The (Young) Rascals, Queen, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Talking Heads, The Ramones, AC/DC, The Clash, The Police, Traffic, ZZ Top, Elvis Costello & The Attractions, The Pretenders, The O'Jays, Blondie, Black Sabbath, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Genesis, The Hollies, The Stooges, Alice Cooper, Neil Diamond, Jeff Beck, Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, Paul Simon, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Neil Young, James Taylor, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, David Bowie, Rod Stewart, Elton John"

How do you know that? By the way, Bowie doesn't care about the Hall. I'm pretty sure he didn't attend his induction.

"Van Halen, R.E.M., U2, John Mellencamp, Madonna and Metallica are fans of Chicago"

This Van Halen, R.E.M., U2 and Metallica fan would like to know where you found that out.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 12.31.10 @ 05:47am


This Van Halen, R.E.M., U2 and Metallica fan would like to know where you found that out.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 12.31.10 @ 05:47am

Well, It's pretty obvious. Chicago pre-dates them. Those bands grew up listening to Chicago. I'm pretty sure the guitarists and bass guitarists from those bands especially would love to see Terry Kath and Peter Cetera being inducted.

Eddie Van Halen, Michael Anthony, Peter Buck, Mike Mills, The Edge, Adam Clayton, James Hetfield, Kirk Hammett, Jason Newsted will all be voting for Chicago, as will all the other members of the groups.

In last year's special Rolling Stone magazine about the 500 greatest songs of Rock, James Hetfield voted Elton John's Candle In the Wind as his fifth favorite song. If you're an Elton John fan, then you're a Chicago fan too!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.10.11 @ 19:48pm


Chicago songs that are over 10 minutes long:

The Chicago Suites Collection

01. 14:40 - Liberation (Chicago Transit Authority/James Pankow)
02. 12:04 - Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon (Chicago II/James Pankow)
03. 10:24 - It Better End Soon (Chicago II/Robert Lamm/Terry Kath/Walter Parazaider)
04. 22:30 - Travel Suite (Chicago III/Robert Lamm/Danny Seraphine/Terry Kath/Walter Parazaider)
05. 15:27 - Elegy (Chicago III/James Pankow)
06. 10:09 - Devil's Sweet (Chicago VII/Walter Parazaider/Danny Seraphine)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.10.11 @ 19:49pm


My Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Speech For Chicago Will Be Posted Tonight Or Early Tomorrow Morning.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.10.11 @ 19:51pm


I'm an Elton John fan and I loathe Chicago.

Posted by DarinRG on Monday, 01.10.11 @ 19:55pm


Chicago's use of brass/woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. And to boot...the fact that their first 7 albums were all double disks is a feat that no other band that I am aware of has ever attempted. Despite the 2-albums (higher costs to buy) they still managed to sell truckloads of them. According to some sources, Chicago has managed to chart an album in the Top 40 in five different decades. Who else has done that?
As far as the type of music they play...rock/jazz/pop...the fact that Jimi Hendrix was put on tour with them is an idication that they were considered "rock n roll" at the time they emerged on the scene.
Chicago is very deserving of a Hall of Fame induction. I didn't even touch on the number of hits, platinum records, total records sold (+100 Million)as a factor to consider. Those stats are available online.

Posted by Steve on Tuesday, 01.11.11 @ 07:33am


Many people have gotten albums into the top 40 over 5 decades. It's not that amazing.

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 01.11.11 @ 09:38am


My guess is only the elite have done so (Beatles, Stones, Elvis, Elton and the like). When AC/DC and Aerosmith release new albums (which they probably will at some point) then they'll join that group. I don't know for sure, but I'd guess it's not that common.

Oh and Roy, I don't know what you're getting at. I asked you how you know that all those people will vote for Chicago, and you said the same thing again, plus you said that if you like Elton John you like Chicago. You're avoiding the question.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 01.11.11 @ 14:38pm


ASSUMING CHICAGO GETS INDUCTED SOMETIME BETWEEN 2012 AND 2017

MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

25 MINUTES LONG!

(Announcer): Ladies and Gentlemen, to induct Chicago into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, please welcome... [the audience cheers and applauds]

Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Credence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll! [the audience claps and hoots]

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, Walter Parazaider and Danny Seraphine met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and would become their manager and producer. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all their own material. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. [the audience claps] Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. In the 70's Chicago used Roman numerals, in the 80's and 90's they used Arabic numerals, and in the 2000's Chicago returned to Roman numerals. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them,--"If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you,"--to which Chicago responded: Go ____ yourself! [the audience laughs and claps] Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years. [the audience claps]

Chicago's first 12 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. In the process though, something happened. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. [the audience claps] Don't get me wrong though, you can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter, and that's it! The band could have said, you know what, we don't want to be on the radio. We are an album oriented rock band. If people want to listen to our music, they'll just have to buy our albums. Back then though, the artists didn't get to call the shots. They were at the mercy of the record companies. So, the songs were made shorter because, as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it, Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). [the audience laughs] You know, because those are the people who listen to radio: people with A.D.D. [the audience laughs] I'm just kidding!

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. [the audience cheers, claps, hoots] It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. [the audience claps] When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. [the audience claps and hoots] During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. [the audience claps and hoots] In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland. [the audience claps]

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; [the audience claps and hoots] an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself, Frank Sinatra, asks you to. [The audience laughs, claps and hoots] Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Make Me Smile, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; [the audience claps and hoots] the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" and "Baby, What A Big Surprise." [the audience claps and hoots] Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. [the audience laughs] Cry in a good way, not a bad way. [the audience laughs] When Kurt Cobain said, “Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally,” he was referring to the omnipresent pessimism and the profound genius in folk icon Leonard Cohen’s lyrics, which he wanted to have for all eternity. Now, if I may, I would like to change that line just a little bit to say, “Give me a Peter Cetera afterworld so I can sigh eternally.” [the audience claps, cheers, hoots, laughs] When I say that, I’m referring to the voice of Peter Cetera. That’s the voice I want playing in my head for all eternity, if there is an afterworld. [the audience laughs and hoots] The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera! [the audience claps, cheers, hoots, laughs] There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” [the audience claps, laughs and hoots!] “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” [the audience laughs] That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! [the audience claps, cheers, laughs, hoots] The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album. Sergio Mendes, Ray Conniff, Barry Manilow, The Isley Brothers, Boyz II Men, Az Yet, 3T, Westlife and countless others have covered these two Chicago classics. [the audience claps and hoots]

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say....And that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. [the audience laughs] So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. [the audience claps, cheers, hoots] Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. [the audience claps and hoots] During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album. [the audience claps, cheers, hoots]

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. [the audience claps, cheers, hoots] During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, that can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez and Brazil '66. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say, a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

..And that folks was Chicago. [the audience claps, cheers, hoots] Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! [the audience hoots] 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. [the audience claps, cheers, hoots] Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, [the speaker points at Chicago in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots] but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! [the speaker points to Elton John in the audience; camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers, hoots] ...And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! [the audience: Yes!] I said, are you ready?! [the audience: Yes!!!] Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. [the audience laughs] Number 01. The Beatles! [the speaker points at Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots] Number 02. The Rolling Stones! [the speaker points at the Rolling Stones in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots] Number 03. The Beach Boys! [the speaker points at the Beach Boys in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots] And at Number 04., Chicago! [the speaker points at Chicago in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots even louder]...And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! [the speaker point at the Bee-Gees in the audience; the camera follows] [the audience claps, cheers and hoots] ...And that says it all right there folks! ...And notice how you've got two British, two American and one Australian band in the top 5 on both lists, who all started out in the 1960s. I don't know, I just thought I'd throw that out there for you to think about, anyway...[the audience laughs] ...And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. [Fans boo] ...And you know what's funny--first, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008, then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth, [the audience laughs hysterically] and then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, [the audience laughs] but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! [the audience laughs; others boo] I'm just kidding! Do we have free speech here or what? [the camera shows Barack Obama in the audience laughing hysterically with his hand covering his face and shaking his head] All I have left to say is that it's about time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago! [audience hoots] This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! [the audience laughs, others boo] I'm kidding, I'm kidding. ...So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!! [the speaker points at Chicago; the audience stands up, claps, cheers and hoots; Chicago walks up to the stage, take their trophies, give their speeches and perform]

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 01.12.11 @ 08:09am


ASSUMING CHICAGO GETS INDUCTED SOMETIME BETWEEN 2012 AND 2017

MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

25 MINUTES LONG!

(Announcer): Ladies and Gentlemen, to induct Chicago into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, please welcome... [the audience cheers and applauds]

Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Credence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll mthrfckrs!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, Walter Parazaider and Danny Seraphine met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all of their own material, except of course for their remake of I'm A Man by The Spencer Davis Group. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. In the 70's Chicago used Roman numerals, in the 80's and 90's they used Arabic numerals, and in the 2000's Chicago returned to Roman numerals. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label, CBS. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them,--"If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you,"--to which Chicago responded: Go fck yourself! Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. The Chicago Transit Authority had Liberation, Chicago II had "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" and "It Better End Soon", Chicago III had "Travel Suite" and "Elegy", and Chicago VII had "Devil's Sweet." Those are the tracks that were over 10 minutes long. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. [the audience claps] You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter, and that's it! But still, the band could have said, you know what, we don't want to be on the radio. We are an album oriented rock band. If people want to listen to our music, they'll just have to buy our albums. Back then though, the artists didn't get to call the shots. They were at the mercy of the record companies. So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D. I'm just kidding!

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Make Me Smile, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" and "Baby, What A Big Surprise." Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. When Kurt Cobain said, “Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally,” he was referring to the omnipresent pessimism and the profound genius in folk icon Leonard Cohen’s lyrics, which he wanted to have for all eternity. Now, if I may, I would like to change that line just a little bit to say, “Give me a Peter Cetera afterworld so I can sigh eternally.” When I say that, I’m referring to the voice of Peter Cetera. That’s the voice I want playing in my head for all eternity, if there is an afterworld. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album. Sergio Mendes, Ray Conniff, Barry Manilow, The Isley Brothers, Boyz II Men, Az Yet, 3T, Westlife and countless others have covered these two Chicago classics.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez and Brazil '66. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

..And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And notice how you've got two British, two American and one Australian band in the top 5 on both lists, who all started out in the 1960s. I don't know, I just thought I'd throw that out there for you to think about, anyway. [the audience laughs] And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008, then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth, and then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! I'm just kidding! Do we have free speech here or what? All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! I'm kidding, I'm kidding. ...So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 05:32am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

Ladies and Gentlemen, to induct Chicago into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, please welcome...

Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll mthrfckrs!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, Walter Parazaider and Danny Seraphine met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all of their own material, except of course for their remake of I'm A Man by The Spencer Davis Group. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. In the 70's Chicago used Roman numerals, in the 80's and 90's they used Arabic numerals, and in the 2000's Chicago returned to Roman numerals. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. The Chicago Transit Authority had Liberation, Chicago II had "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" and "It Better End Soon", Chicago III had "Travel Suite" and "Elegy", and Chicago VII had "Devil's Sweet." Those are the tracks that were over 10 minutes long. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter, and that's it! But still, the band could have said, you know what, we don't want to be on the radio. We are an album oriented rock band. If people want to listen to our music, they'll just have to buy our albums. Back then though, the artists didn't get to call the shots. They were at the mercy of the record companies. So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Make Me Smile, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" and "Baby, What A Big Surprise." Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. When Kurt Cobain said, “Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally,” he was referring to the omnipresent pessimism and the profound genius in folk icon Leonard Cohen’s lyrics, which he wanted to have for all eternity. Now, if I may, I would like to change that line just a little bit to say, “Give me a Peter Cetera afterworld so I can sigh eternally.” When I say that, I’m referring to the voice of Peter Cetera. That’s the voice I want playing in my head for all eternity, if there is an afterworld. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album. Sergio Mendes, Ray Conniff, Barry Manilow, The Isley Brothers, Boyz II Men, Az Yet, 3T, Westlife and countless others have covered these two Chicago classics.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

...And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And notice how you've got two British, two American and one Australian band in the top 5 on both lists, who all started out in the 1960s. I don't know, I just thought I'd throw that out there for you to think about, anyway. And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008, then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth, and then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 07:40am


Ladies and Gentlemen, to induct Chicago into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, please welcome...

Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll mthrfckrs!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, Walter Parazaider and Danny Seraphine met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all of their own material, except of course for their remake of I'm A Man by The Spencer Davis Group. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. In the 70's Chicago used Roman numerals, in the 80's and 90's they used Arabic numerals, and in the 2000's Chicago returned to Roman numerals. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter, and that's it! But still, the band could have said, you know what, we don't want to be on the radio. We are an album oriented rock band. If people want to listen to our music, they'll just have to buy our albums. Back then though, the artists didn't get to call the shots. They were at the mercy of the record companies. So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Make Me Smile, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. When Kurt Cobain said, “Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally,” he was referring to the omnipresent pessimism and the profound genius in folk icon Leonard Cohen’s lyrics, which he wanted to have for all eternity. Now, if I may, I would like to change that line just a little bit to say, “Give me a Peter Cetera afterworld so I can sigh eternally.” When I say that, I’m referring to the voice of Peter Cetera. That’s the voice I want playing in my head for all eternity, if there is an afterworld. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album, which by the way was written with producer David Foster.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

...And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And notice how you've got two British, two American and one Australian band in the top 5 on both lists, who all started out in the 1960s. I don't know, I just thought I'd throw that out there for you to think about, anyway. And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008, then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth, and then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 18:44pm


Roy, you've posted it already. How many times are you gonna keep re-posting it?

Posted by Philip on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 18:53pm


I'm finished now! You won't hear from me again until Chicago is inducted!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 18:58pm


Nice writeup, Roy. Hope they get inducted some day (Terry Kath years only).

Posted by Paul in KY on Friday, 01.14.11 @ 06:40am


Nice writeup, Roy. Hope they get inducted some day (Terry Kath years only).

Posted by Paul in KY on Friday, 01.14.11 @ 06:40am

Thanks, and it's not going to happen. I have already stated the reasons and given examples. See The Eagles and Van Halen.

THE DEFINITE CHICAGO INDUCTEES WILL BE

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.14.11 @ 07:03am


THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.15.11 @ 07:06am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll mthrfckrs!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all of their own material, except of course for their remake of I'm A Man by The Spencer Davis Group. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. In the 70's Chicago used Roman numerals, in the 80's and 90's they used Arabic numerals, and in the 2000's Chicago returned to Roman numerals. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter, and that's it! But still, the band could have said, you know what, we don't want to be on the radio. We are an album oriented rock band. If people want to listen to our music, they'll just have to buy our albums. Back then though, the artists didn't get to call the shots. They were at the mercy of the record companies. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. When Kurt Cobain said, “Give me a Leonard Cohen afterworld so I can sigh eternally,” he was referring to the omnipresent pessimism and the profound genius in folk icon Leonard Cohen’s lyrics, which he wanted to have for all eternity. Now, if I may, I would like to change that line just a little bit to say, “Give me a Peter Cetera afterworld so I can sigh eternally.” When I say that, I’m referring to the voice of Peter Cetera. That’s the voice I want playing in my head for all eternity, if there is an afterworld. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. Bill Champlin also sang the theme to the 80's and 90's prime time television series "In The Heat Of The Night" starring Carroll O'Connor. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

...And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And notice how you've got two British, two American and one Australian band in the top 5 on both lists, who all started out in the 1960s. I don't know, I just thought I'd throw that out there for you to think about, anyway. And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008, then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth, and then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.16.11 @ 20:31pm


I'm finished now! You won't hear from me again until Chicago is inducted!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.13.11 @ 18:58pm

i thought you're done.

Posted by attention deficit disorder on Sunday, 01.16.11 @ 23:20pm


Considering the speeches are normally, from what i've seen, around 2 -4 minutes yeah that wouldn't fly.
also, hootin all up in this bitch.

Posted by GFW on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 11:06am


Long speeches are allowed. Mine is only 25 minutes long. Remember all the long speeches from 2008? Justin Timberlake for Madonna, plus Madonna's speech? Billy Joel for John Mellencamp, plus Mellencamp's speech? Tom Hanks for The Dave Clark Five, plus the The Dave Clark Five speeches?

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 11:21am


25 minutes still sems to be a lot...

Posted by GFW on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 11:41am


2008 was a great ceremony... yeah Billy Joel and Tom Hanks had long speeches, but theirs were GOOD because they were never boring. JT tried to be funny and failed miserably, that it got painfully long. Lou Reed was just fricken unrehearsed and took up extra time as a result. The DC5 members' speeches weren't that long though.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 13:08pm


Roy is the Brett Farve of Future Rock Hall. The joke may be old, but just sayin....

Posted by Jim on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 14:11pm


Roy is the Brett Farve of Future Rock Hall. The joke may be old, but just sayin....

Posted by Jim on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 14:11pm

Please explain.

I could take out the first paragraph about all the members being present at the ceremony, and the bullshit drama of previous inductees, plus the last part of the last paragraph about Barack Obama, The Chicago Blackhawks and the whole Chicago conspiracy from my speech. That would take my speech down to 20 minutes. Chicago deserves a long induction speech though, because there was so much that happened with that band and it's taking so long for their induction.

I will repost a shorter version of my speech.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 14:34pm


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

Good evening!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record. Blood, Sweat & Tears reached the recording stage sooner because of band leader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all of their own material, except of course for their remake of I'm A Man by The Spencer Davis Group. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago, on the other hand, was a rock band who could and did play jazz; a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. Bill Champlin is also well known in the music industry as a studio musician and a songwriter for other artists, some of whom are here in the room tonight. Most notably, Bill Champlin wrote the Grammy award winning songs "After The Love Has Gone" for Earth, Wind & Fire, and "Turn Your Love Around" for George Benson. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

...And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 15:01pm


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

Good evening!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Horn parts that were long and intricate and didn't just honk along here and there at certain points during a song. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with A.D.D. (Attention Deficit Disorder). You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. Peter Cetera had a voice that could make both women and men cry like babies. Cry in a good way, not a bad way. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing lead in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

...And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

...And that folks was Chicago. Classical, Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Folk, Funk, Hard Rock, Prog, Country, Latin and Pop--Chicago did it all! If you don't know the music of Chicago, then you don't know shit about Rock And Roll! 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago!, but number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 15:30pm


i won't be bothered if you make Kelis' induction speech but your Chicago speech bores me to death, no one will listen to it and if ever they're gonna use your script everyone would go to the washroom.

im just annoyed you took half of the page.

Posted by attention deficit disorder on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 15:53pm


Will Chicago ever get in? Who knows- but the fact that the band's been eligible since 1994 and has not been inducted (has it ever been nominated?) indicates the the HOF does not consider the band an essential, impactful band, at least on the level of other acts who have been inducted. I happen to enjoy Chicago's music (even the slick, overly commercial 80s ballads era- which may have hurt its chances)- but, it is what it is.

Posted by JR on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 16:01pm


Roy is the Brett Farve of Future Rock Hall. The joke may be old, but just sayin....

Posted by Jim on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 14:11pm

Please explain.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 00:18am


i won't be bothered if you make Kelis' induction speech but your Chicago speech bores me to death, no one will listen to it and if ever they're gonna use your script everyone would go to the washroom.

im just annoyed you took half of the page.

Posted by attention deficit disorder on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 15:53pm


Wouldn't how boring you find it depend on your amount of interest in Chicago? Someone who hates the band would obviously rather receive paper cuts on their eyelids than listen to it. Whereas a diehard fan would be hanging on to every word. Personally, if that same speech length-wise was about the Rolling Stones, obviously I'd sit through it as I'm a fan but if it was about, say New Kids on the Block (which will never happen), I'd rather sit through a sequence of bad Eddie Murphy movies.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 02:34am


And to add I don't think anyone would listen to a speech that length on Kelis, of course you probably wouldn't have enough on Kelis' "career" to put one paragraph together let alone a dozen or however many Roy has.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 02:36am


And to add I don't think anyone would listen to a speech that length on Kelis, of course you probably wouldn't have enough on Kelis' "career" to put one paragraph together let alone a dozen or however many Roy has.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 02:36am

if roy would be making a serious speech for kelis, i won't be bothered but i'll be LMAO. i was just being sarcastic Tahvo when i posted something about kelis. no need to be serious, you need to take care of your heart, hehe

Posted by attention deficit disorder on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 08:44am


one more thing Tahvo, i don't have a problem with chicago getting in, in fact that would be wonderful. i was just annoyed with the long speech.

Posted by attention deficit disorder on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 08:48am


LOL no worries ADD, I can assure you I was not harboring any strong emotions when I wrote that, quite the opposite actually

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 09:55am


I was just listening to Chicago Live in Japan...I just don't understand people who say that Chicago was not a Rock-n-Roll band. Listening to them jam at the end of the album on "25 or 6 to 4" can leave no doubt that this band could rock!!

And for the record, Roy, I enjoyed the speech. Nicely put together. I also agree with the list of inductees listed.

Posted by Steve on Tuesday, 01.18.11 @ 13:32pm


http://fuse.tv/ontv/shows/rock-hall-2010/video26.html

What do you think of Trey Anastasio of Phish giving the induction speech for Chicago, the way he gave the induction speech for Genesis?

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 01.19.11 @ 05:57am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

Good evening!

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!


THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.20.11 @ 03:27am


Roy is the Brett Farve of Future Rock Hall. The joke may be old, but just sayin....

Posted by Jim on Monday, 01.17.11 @ 14:11pm

I suppose that's referring to the times when he said "This really is my last speech on Chicago?" Or the fact that the same speech has been posted twice? Just a guess. As a Jets fan, I hope Brett really is done. First off, the "will he or won't he?" is annoying. Second, he's nothing to prove, he should just hang it up while he can still walk. Two more wins baby! Are you ready for a show to be put on tonight?

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 01.23.11 @ 07:06am


Read all the credits in the booklets that came with Chicago's 70's albums and read wikipedia.

Chicago studio albums where only the 7 original members of the band perform on their own instruments without any help from additional musicians in the studio:

Chicago Transit Authority, Chicago II, Chicago III, Chicago V, Chicago VI, Chicago VIII

01. Walter Parazaider (saxophone; clarinet; flute)
02. Lee Loughnane (trumpet; flugelhorn)
03. James Pankow (trombone)
04. Robert Lamm (piano; keyboards)
05. Terry Kath (guitar)
06. Peter Cetera (bass guitar)
07. Danny Seraphine (drums)

Chicago albums that included the 7 original members playing their own instruments, with additional musicians taking their place on some tracks due to fatigue and drug use:

Chicago VII, Chicago X, Chicago XI, Hot Streets, Chicago 13

01. Walter Parazaider (saxophone; clarinet; flute)
02. Lee Loughnane (trumpet; flugelhorn)
03. James Pankow (trombone)
04. Robert Lamm (piano; keyboards)
05. Terry Kath (guitar)
06. Peter Cetera (bass guitar)
07. Danny Seraphine (drums)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (percussions)
09. Donnie Dacus (guitar)

Additional musicians; 20 tracks; it really wasn't that much!:

David Wolinski - ARP synthesizer, Mellotron on two tracks from Chicago VII

James William Guercio - acoustic guitar and bass on two tracks from Chicago VII

Jimmie Haskell - strings on one track from Chicago VII

Wayne Tarnowski - piano on one track from Chicago VII

Guille Garcia - congas on one track from Chicago VII

David Wolinski - piano and mellotron on "Hope For Love" from the Chicago X album

James William Guercio - acoustic guitar and bass on "If You Leave Me Now"; guitar on "Hope For Love" from the Chicago X album

Othello Molineaux - steel drums on "Another Rainy Day in New York City" from the Chicago X album

Leroy Williams - steel drums on "Another Rainy Day in New York City" from the Chicago X album

Jimmie Haskell - string and french horn orchestration on "If You Leave Me Now"; string conductor on "Gently I'll Wake You" from the Chicago X album

Rudolph Trulli - tambourine, backing vocals on 'If You Leave Me Now' from the Chicago X album

David "Hawk" Wolinski – ARP synthesizer on "Take Me Back to Chicago"; Fender Rhodes on "Little One' from the Chicago XI album

James William Guercio – acoustic guitars and bass on "Baby, What a Big Surprise" from the Chicago XI album

Dominic Frontiere – orchestral conception & orchestration on "Baby, What A Big Surprise"; orchestration for "The Inner Struggles of a Man"; string and orchestral arrangements for "Little One" from the Chicago XI album

David "Hawk" Wolinski - Fender Rhodes on "Show Me The Way" from the Hot Streets album

David "Hawk" Wolinski - synthesizer on "Street Player" from the Chicago 13 album

Airto Moreira - percussion on "Street Player", "Paradise Alley", "Life Is What It Is" and "Run Away" from the Chicago 13 album

Maynard Ferguson - trumpet on "Street Player" from the Chicago 13 album

THE 80s-90s ALBUMS: The whole band played, plus many additional musician. TOO MANY TO LIST, SO I WON'T!

Chicago XIV, Chicago 16, Chicago 17, Chicago 18, Chicago 19, Twenty 1, Chicago XXX, Chicago XXXII

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 01.26.11 @ 06:21am


Greatest Hits Albums are for people with Attention Deficit Disorder.

Posted by ClashWho on Wednesday, 01.26.11 @ 06:26am


Neither Chicago or Jethro Tull in the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame? I guess I won't be visiting Cleveland anytime soon.

Posted by themayorn206 on Monday, 01.31.11 @ 03:50am


http://www.bassplayer.com/article/chicagos-peter-cetera/nov-07/32489

Chicago's Peter Cetera

Chris Jisi | BASS PLAYER MAGAZINE | November 2007

Peter Cetera’s lively-yet-locked bass lines and melodic upper-fret forays influenced a generation of privy peers and subsequent budding bassists, including Will Lee and Nathan East. Notes Lee, of The Late Show and hundreds of New York sessions, “Peter had an R&B-rooted style marked by great taste and tone, plus a real McCartney-esque quality. He was the polish in the whole Chicago picture, adding sweetness to the vocal harmonies, while providing a gorgeous sound on the top and bottom. Very few days go by that I’m not thinking about him somewhere in my playing.” A long-time Eric Clapton sideman and L.A. session master, East adds, “Peter was one of my very first influences as a young bass student. I was just becoming familiar with the instrument and I grabbed a bunch of Peter’s licks for my arsenal because he had such great ideas. I used to sing ‘Questions 67 and 68’ in a church group I was in, with my brothers, and then I played all the big hits in Top 40 bands. I got to back up Peter recently at a David Foster charity event, and I realized how much influence his playing still has on my approach.”

Born and raised in Chicago’s Morgan Park section, on the South Side, Cetera recalls radio transitioning from the Hit Parade to the early rock & roll of Little Richard, Buddy Holly, and Ritchie Valens. At age 11, unable to convince his parents to buy him a guitar, he instead was given accordion lessons. A few years later, some older friends took him to a teenage nightclub outside of town. He recalls, “I walked in and a band called the Rebel Rockers was playing. I remember the guitarist and bass player were standing on their amps, rocking back and forth. I thought it was the coolest thing I’d ever seen—I was hooked.” As a 15-year-old high school sophomore, Cetera got a Montgomery Ward acoustic guitar and learned some open chords. Upon meeting and jamming with a guitar-playing senior who wanted to form a band, Peter moved over to bass, buying a Danelectro Short Horn. The two added a drummer and saxophonist, split vocal duties, and made their mark on the weekend dance scene.

Cetera stayed the course, moving on to better Top 40 bands and hitting the club and concert trail all over the Midwest. “By the time I was 18,” he admits, “I was making more money than my dad.” Eventually, he joined the Exceptions, staying six years with the Chicago area’s “best sound-alike” band. The group gained invaluable experience as a rare white band on the chitlin’ circuit, opening for and becoming the Dells’ backup band, and signing with a Chess subsidiary, Tollie Records. For the opening of a new club in December 1967, the Exceptions were booked opposite the Big Thing—a six-piece horn band that played some original music, but relied on organ pedals for bass lines. The unit was looking to add a singing bass player, and Cetera, digging their sound, look, and hippie headspace, accepted the role. So began a 17-year, 16-album journey with the newly named Chicago Transit Authority.

By the time Cetera left Chicago in 1985 to pursue a solo career, he had left his indelible mark not just as a bassist, but also as a lead-singing frontman and composer. That’s his unmistakable high tenor (part of his four-and-a-half-octave vocal range) on “25 or 6 to 4,” “Questions 67 and 68,” “Just You ’n’ Me,” and “Feelin’ Stronger Every Day.” As a writer, he penned such hits as “Wishing You Were Here,” “If You Leave Me Now,” “Happy Man,” and “Baby What a Big Surprise,” and he co-wrote the band’s biggest singles, “You’re the Inspiration” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry,” with producer David Foster. The pair also combined for Peter’s own No. 1 hit, “Glory of Love.”

Bass took a backseat in Cetera’s solo years (which yielded seven albums), but it has begun to re-emerge of late. Explains Peter, “Bass remains in my heart; I read Bass Player to keep up on the latest players and gear, and I played on a track [“Something That Santa Claus Left Behind”] for my latest CD, You Just Gotta Love Christmas.” Now based in Idaho, Cetera will play bass live for the first time in over ten years when he and his “unplugged band,” the Baad Daddies, embark on a December U.S. tour in support of the disc. With his friendly and engaging Midwest manner, Peter was happy to talk about his life and times as a low-ender, starting with his bass beginnings.

What do you recall about your initial bass experience?

It was pretty funny; I got my Danelectro Short Horn and I asked somebody in our band how to tune it. He said, I think it’s tuned like the first four strings of a guitar. So, that’s what I did. I started playing, and I’m thinking, gee, it doesn’t sound real bassy. A few weeks later, a famous local bassist came and sat in at our club gig. He put the bass on and went, What the hell?! He quickly tuned it down the right way and I had to learn all over again; I was lucky the neck hadn’t snapped! From there, I went on to a Fender Precision, with an Ampeg B-15 flip-top. That was a big step up, sound-wise. Another bad habit I developed was fingering some notes on the E string over the top, with my left thumb.

Who were your early influences?

Well, the guitarist in my band taught me some Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed tunes, and I was still playing with a pick, having come right from the guitar. Then R&B and soul took a more modern turn, and Motown was all over the radio. I didn’t know who James Jamerson was, but when I heard his parts I thought, Oh, my God! I knew I needed to start playing with my fingers. “My Girl” really solidified that for me; I would anchor my thumb on the P-Bass thumbrest and alternate my index and middle fingers, but I also kept a pick wedged in behind the pickguard, and I’d switch between styles. Seeing James Brown and his band a few times influenced my technique and approach, too, as did the bassists we played opposite on the chitlin’ circuit.

How about your vocal start and influences?

I had never sung in school or anywhere, but when we got the band together it was just, Who’s going to sing this one? “I will,” I said, and I was off. I remember the first song I sang was “Mashed Potato.” I got the obligatory shock when touching the mic and bass strings [laughs]. At that point, I was trying to sound like everyone, but one person I picked up a lot of phrasing and style points from was a pianist/singer on Chess named Billy Stewart; he had a hit with a cover of Gershwin’s “Summertime.”

There were two key early lessons for me. The first was from a friend’s father, a jazz saxophonist who took us to see people like Stan Kenton and the Four Freshman. He said, “Pay close attention to everyone you listen to. If you like them, you’ll pick up something from them; if you don’t like them, you’ll learn what you don’t want to do.” The other was seeing James Brown in a mostly empty auditorium one afternoon. He could have taken it easy, given the setting, but he was jumping around, sweating and yelling at the band, just giving it his all.

Your move from the Exceptions to what would become Chicago seems like a pivotal time.

It really was part of an awakening for me. The Beatles had come along and changed everything. I realized I was playing other people’s music, from a different era, and didn’t have my own voice yet. The Beatles showed that it could be done; it was music of my generation. And Paul McCartney’s bass lines were pure genius; it was almost like he was playing a whole different instrument. I bought a ’64 Hofner right away to use in the Exceptions, but it just wasn’t bassy and ballsy enough for Chicago, so I got a ’63 P-Bass and had it painted paisley. I was aware of other great rock bassists, like Jack Bruce and John Entwistle, but besides Jamerson and McCartney, the guy whose playing really spoke to me for its uniqueness was Andy Fraser of Free.

Chicago quickly relocated to Los Angeles.

We discovered we couldn’t make it in Chicago because radio wouldn’t play you unless you were famous, but the only way to get famous was to be on the radio! Our manager, Jimmy Guercio, who was a producer at CBS, moved us out to L.A. in June 1968. It was an amazing time; Jimmy got us steady Tuesdays at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go. One night Jimi Hendrix came in, and word spread across the stage. After the set he came knocking on the dressing room door and said, “You guys are mthrfckrs! I want you to come on tour with me,” which we did. The same thing happened with Janis Joplin.

What was your bass approach in Chicago, and how did you come up with your parts?

My primary goal was to be melodic; McCartney was so in my head then that I’d try to think a little out of the box—like picking my spots for the upper-register stuff. Plus, Jamerson and my R&B roots were in my subconscious, so keeping a strong groove went without saying. Coming up with parts varied by who wrote the songs. Bobby’s [keyboardist Robert Lamm] tunes were fun to play; they were melodic, they had meaning, and he wouldn’t give you too much of a parameter—you would just play what you felt and he’d say, “Cool.” Terry [guitarist Kath] was more defined and opinionated as to what he wanted and didn’t want. And Jimmy [trombonist James Pankow] was really specific about what to play. But, as I say, I always tried to be melodic when the time in the track allowed for it. The only song that was given to all of us note-for-note by Jimmy was “Colour My World.”

How would you get through the band’s extended instrumental suites, which often had odd-meter figures?

That was a challenge because I’ve never been the most knowledgeable bass player; I don’t really read music and if you’re talking about chords, I don’t go much past, “Is it major or minor?” On the instrumentals, I would have chord charts to follow, and I’d just feel my way through the odd-time stuff. I also had a live bass solo in the early shows, but I can’t remember the song. It was a one-chord vamp and my main inspiration at the time was Free’s Andy Fraser’s work on Free Live [A&M, 1971].

How was your hookup with drummer Danny Seraphine?

I first met Danny during my club days, and he subbed with the Exceptions. He was a great, funky, raw “street” drummer, with a small kit, and we locked well together from the start. In Chicago, I was a pushing kind of player, as was Terry, but Danny was laid back a bit and Robert leaned back, so we had the pocket covered from both sides! Eventually, Danny started taking lessons and his approach changed; Terry called it “lead drums,” so having Laudir De Oliveira, and later, my brother Kenny, on percussion helped solidify the overall groove.

How did you approach singing while playing on various Chicago tunes?

I didn’t really put singing and playing together conceptually in Chicago because the bass parts were important and they were constant, so if I had to sing lead on a tune it was something separate. Fortunately, I’d been doing it since my club days. In the beginning I was singing songs that had blues-pattern-type bass lines, so it wasn’t too bad—but in later cover bands, I had worked my way up to real rub-your-tummy/pat-your-head-type tunes, like “Good Vibrations.”

My first sing-and-play for Chicago was “Questions 67 and 68,” which, like “25 or 6 to 4,” was really high. I remember getting nervous and blowing the top notes one night at the Fillmore East because Leonard Bernstein was in the audience! “Dialogue, Pt. 1 and Pt. 2,” my duet with Terry, was my favorite sing-and-play because it was the most free. Overall, I found the key to singing while playing is to learn both parts separately and then slowly work them together though the tune, section by section. The more you perform the song the more comfortable you’ll become, to the point where you can loosen up and expand on both parts.

Apparently, there was a period of adjustment when the band first went into the studio.

That’s true. We were the greatest live band; we would blow anyone off the stage, but we didn’t have experience in the studio. When we went to Columbia Studios in New York City, the pressure was on. We had limited time, so it was decided to record live. Well, we soon realized we had to do it separately: rhythm section, then horns, and then vocals. And in those days, we couldn’t punch, so if someone made a mistake we’d have to start over. This was especially frustrating for me; I was a live player, with two or three good takes in me. We were doing up to 50 takes! We’d get to the end of take 49 and someone would make a mistake and we’d have to go back and do it all again. It got better, but I never really felt comfortable playing in the studio, where you’re under the microscope. Even our live Carnegie Hall album [At Carnegie Hall, Vol. 1-4] had a studio-like atmosphere; the best example of us live at the time was the bootleg of the show in Japan. [In January, Rhino will release Live in Japan as a concert DVD.]

Why did bass take a backseat when you began your solo career?

There were several reasons, which tie in to why I left Chicago. As I mentioned, I was already uncomfortable with my playing in the studio. Plus, there was a growing faction of the band that wanted to be a jazz group—even though none of us were jazz musicians. I always felt we were a song band. When some of the more ambitious material fell short, and a ballad I contributed, “If You Leave Me Now,” became a No. 1 hit, that widened the chasm. I got pigeonholed as the soft-rock ballad writer, even though ballads weren’t the only thing I was writing.

When David Foster was brought in to produce our first album for Warner Bros. [Chicago 16], that really took bass out of the equation. He and I clicked immediately and started writing together, but the sound of pop music had changed. David was not only the best keyboard player I’d ever heard in my life, he was the best drum programmer and the best synth bass player. I would go to pick up my bass and then hear him play a killer Moog groove and I’d literally put the bass away in its case. It just didn’t fit the music at that point. I also began to feel that during my time with the band, because I hadn’t been able to fully focus on either singing or bass playing, both had suffered. So, when I went solo soon after, I decided to concentrate entirely on singing and being a frontman.

Let’s talk about other bassists; you went on to use many top players on your albums.

Intentionally, because I knew there were so many great bassists out there. Two players who had a big impact on me in the ’70s were Willie Weeks and Jaco Pastorius. When I first heard Willie’s solo on “Everything Is Everything,” from Donny Hathaway Live, I was blown away; that’s like the greatest bass solo ever! I got to meet Willie in L.A. and he would come and hang at my house and play this Guild acoustic bass guitar I had. I lost contact with him; later, when I started recording in Nashville, I found out he was down there and was thrilled. He did my sessions and we hung out, and he’s still the most humble guy you can imagine. Jaco came to hear Chicago in the mid ’70s, and then we got together at my house, where he played that same Guild. He was totally straight then and just the nicest cat, but hearing him up close I was like, I can’t even call myself a bassist! Yet, he said to me, “I’d kill to play with you guys; if you ever need a sub please call me!”

I’ve gotten to know legends like Carol Kaye, Joe Osborn, Duck Dunn, and Chuck Rainey. I get as tickled meeting them as meeting stars like McCartney and Brian Wilson. I used Pino Palladino on a couple of my albums, after hearing his amazing work with Paul Young. I also had a great hang with [current Chicago bassist] Jason Scheff not too long ago; he’s a terrific bass player and singer.

How do you reflect on your career?

Overall, I’m very proud of my Chicago and solo careers, and I have no real regrets. At times, I wish I had become more of a formally trained musician and composer, and that I’d learned other instruments and my way around a studio better. But I’ve heard Paul McCartney and other top artists say the same thing—not that I’m putting myself in that class. To be told that I had an impact as a bass player all these years later is quite nice.

Hard Habit To Break

Peter Cetera began his Chicago career with his ’64 Fender Precision (featuring a rosewood fingerboard and custom Paisley-painted body). Though he tried numerous other basses—including a Gibson EB-3, Rickenbacker 4001, Gibson Ripper, and fretted and fretless Fender Jazz Basses—it was the P-Bass he kept returning to. He began with La Bella flatwounds but moved on to roundwounds, never quite liking them as much as the flats. His live amp choices were more transient, including Kustom, Acoustic, Sound City, Phase Linear, Orange, and Ampeg rigs. In the studio, Cetera generally recorded his P-Basses (he used producer James Guercio’s Precision on the first album) both direct and through an Ampeg B-15, at times with tissues stuffed under the strings for a bit of damping. Cetera’s bass was always prominent in the mix, perhaps in part because Guercio was a bassist.

Currently, Peter’s bass collection features his ’64 P-Bass (now white), a Lake Placid Blue ’65 Jazz Bass, his ’64 Hofner Beatle Bass, a ’65 Vox Constellation IV bass, and a Tune Bass Maniac. Most are strung with La Bella flatwounds. He borrowed Nashville session ace Mike Brignardello’s P-Bass to record the track on his Christmas CD, and he’s expecting his McPherson acoustic bass guitar in time for his December tour. His picks are Fender mediums.

Selected Discography

Solo albums:
You Just Gotta Love Christmas, www.petercetera.com
Another Perfect World, DDE
You’re the Inspiration: A Collection, River North
One Clear Voice, River North.

On Warner Bros.:
World Falling Down
One More Story
Solitude/Solitaire
Peter Cetera

With Chicago:
The Best of Chicago: 40th Anniversary Edition, Rhino
Chicago: The Box, Rhino
Chicago 17, Warner Bros.
Chicago 16, Warner Bros.

On the Chicago label:
The Innovative Guitar of Terry Kath
Chicago XIV
Chicago 13
Hot Streets
Chicago XI
Chicago X
Chicago VIII
Chicago VII
Chicago VI
Live in Japan
Chicago V
At Carnegie Hall, Vol. 1-4
Chicago II
Chicago Transit Authority

Currently Spinning

“I recently got the Beatles Anthology [Capitol/EMI Video] CDs and DVDs as a gift, so I’ve been marveling at Paul McCartney’s playing all over again.”

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 02.10.11 @ 06:34am


http://tomlanesblog.blogspot.com/2011/02/chicago-and-ro-ck-hall.html

Chicago and The Rock Hall

A clue, perhaps, as to why Chicago is not in the Rock Hall. In the February 2011 issue of Britain's Record Collector, original drummer Danny Seraphine has this reply as to why Chicago is not in: "I think there was an ongoing feud with Rolling Stone magazine. It seemed everyone was getting on the cover and we were huge and they never put us on the cover. Jimmy Guercio, our producer got into a feud with Jann Wenner, which I think kept us out of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. I don't think we've ever been on the ballot (note: they haven't). Chicago sold 130 million records, and maybe it's not all about sales, but our early records are beautifully crafted and great music. For me, it's a slap in the face to the fans and to the band too."

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 19:22pm


http://www.manofmusic.com/forums/index.php?topic=6866.0

The cover of this month's Record Collector magazine with the Danny Seraphine interview. David Bowie on cover, and Chicago listed at the bottom left.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 19:50pm



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X9-O5zD86Y

Chicago Rockpalast Concert Essen, Germany (Remastered) 2-12-1977

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:21pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZTZ4ocBhpg

Chicago Concert Japan (Remastered) 1972

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:22pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gbla8U0dsrs

Chicago Concert (Remastered) Amsterdam 1977

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:30pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgu3HV7mk1A

Chicago Concert (Remastered) Dortmund 1982

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:31pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJ6idx1a3aU

Chicago Concert Tanglewood (Remastered) July 21, 1970

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:37pm




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruvCxaFKELs&feature=related

Chicago VH1 Behind The Music Complete Show

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 20:58pm


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkGkNdxkugo

Chicago Concert Sydney Australia (Remastered) 1979

Posted by Roy on Monday, 02.14.11 @ 05:28am


Chicago: Who Wrote What?

Written by Robert Lamm

01. Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
02. Beginnings
03. Questions 67 & 68
04. Listen
05. Poem 58
06. South California Purples
07. Someday (August 29, 1968)
08. Poem For The People
09. Wake Up Sunshine
10. Fancy Colours
11. 25 Or 6 To 4
12. It Better End Soon
13. Sing A Mean Tune Kid
14. Loneliness Is Just A Word
15. I Don't Want Your Money
16. Travel Suite
17. Mother
18. A Hit By Varese
19. All Is Well
20. Dialogue
21. While The City Sleeps
22. Saturday In The Park
23. State of the Union
24. Goodbye
25. Critic's Choice
26. Darlin' Dear
27. Something In This City Changes People
28. Hollywood
29. Rediscovery
30. Italian From New York
31. Hanky Panky
32. Life Saver
33. Woman Don't Want To Love Me
34. Skinny Boy
35. Never Been In Love Before
36. Harry Truman
37. Long Time No See
38. Ain't It Blue?
39. Another Rainy Day In New York City
40. Scrapbook
41. Gently I'll Wake You
42. You Get It Up
43. Policeman
44. Vote For Me
45. Hot Streets
46. Love Was New
47. Paradise Alley
48. Reruns
49. A Song For Richard and His Friends
50. Bright Eyes
51. Paris
52. Manipulation
53. Upon Arrival
54. Thunder and Lightning
55. I'd Rather Be Rich
56. Doin' Business
57. Soldier of Fortune
58. Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
59. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
60. Where We Begin
61. Good For Nothing
62. Forever
63. Over and Over
64. I Stand Up
65. One From The Heart
66. Only Time Can Heal the Wounded
67. Love Is Forever
68. All the Years
69. Plaid
70. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
71. The Pull
72. Sleeping In the Middle of the Bed
73. Back To You
74. 90 Degrees and Freezing
75. Come To Me, Do

Written by James Pankow

01. Someday (August 29, 1968)
02. Liberation
03. Movin' In
04. Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon
05. Elegy
06. Now That You've Gone
07. Just You 'N' Me
08. What's This World Comin' To
09. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
10. Aire
11. (I've Been) Searchin' So Long
12. Mongonucleosis
13. Brand New Love Affair
14. Old Days
15. You Are On My Mind
16. Skin Tight
17. 'Till The End of Time
18. Wish I Could Fly
19. Alive Again
20. Run Away
21. The American Dream
22. Live It Up
23. Bad Advice
24. Follow Me
25. What Can I Say
26. Only You
27. Once In A Lifetime
28. Free Flight
29. One More Day
30. God Save the Queen
31. Love Is Forever
32. Here With Me (Candle For the Dark)
33. Get On This
34. The Only One
35. Show Me A Sign

Written by Peter Cetera

01. Where Do We Go From Here?
02. What Else Can I Say?
03. Lowdown
04. Feelin’ Stronger Everyday
05. In Terms Of Two
06. Happy Man
07. Wishing You Were Here
08. Anyway You Want
09. Hideaway
10. Mama Mama
11. If You Leave Me Now
12. Baby, What A Big Surprise
13. Little Miss Lovin’
14. Gone Long Gone
15. No Tell Lover
16. Mama Take
17. Loser With A Broken Heart
18. Upon Arrival
19. Song For You
20. Where Did The Lovin’ Go?
21. Hold On
22. Overnight Café
23. Thunder and Lightning
24. Bad Advice
25. Rescue You
26. Chains
27. Hard To Say I’m Sorry/Get Away
28. Love Me Tomorrow
29. Stay the Night
30. Along Comes a Woman
31. Prima Donna
32. Remember the Feeling
33. You're the Inspiration

Written by Terry Kath

01. Introduction
02. Free Form Guitar
03. The Road
04. In The Country
05. Prelude
06. A.M. Mourning
07. P.M. Mourning
08. Memories of Love
09. It Better End Soon
10. I Don't Want Your Money
11. Travel Suite
12. An Hour In The Shower
13. Alma Mater
14. Jenny
15. Beyond All Our Sorrows
16. Song of the Evergreens
17. Byblos
18. 'Til We Meet Again
19. Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
20. Sixth Sense
21. Once Or Twice
22. Hope For Love
23. Your Love's An Attitude
24. Mississippi Delta City Blues
25. Takin' It On Uptown

Written by Danny Seraphine

01. Travel Suite
02. Lowdown
03. Prelude To Aire
04. Aire
05. Devil’s Sweet
06. Take Me Back To Chicago
07. Prelude (Little One)
08. Little One
09. The Greatest Love On Earth
10. Take A Chance
11. Ain’t It Time
12. No Tell Lover
13. Show Me The Way
14. Street Player
15. Aloha Mama
16. Birthday Boy
17. Thunder and Lightning
18. Sonny Think Twice

Written by Lee Loughnane

01. Call On Me
02. Together Again
03. This Time
04. Take A Chance
05. No Tell Lover
06. Wndow Dreamin'
07. Stone of Sisyphus
08. Child's Prayer

Written by Walter Parazaider

01. It Better End Soon
02. Travel Suite
03. Aire
04. Devil’s Sweet
05. Window Dreamin’

Written by Laudir De Oliveira

01. Life Is What It Is

Written by Donnie Dacus

01. Aint It Time
02. Must Have Been Crazy
03. Closer To You

Written by Bill Champlin

01. Sonny Think Twice
02. Daddy's Favorite Fool
03. We Can Stop the Hurtin'
04. Remember the Feeling
05. Please Hold On
06. It's Alright
07. I Believe
08. Come In From the Night
09. Runaround
10. Somebody, Somewhere
11. Who Do You Love
12. Holdin On
13. Hearts In Trouble
14. Plaid
15. Cry For the Lost
16. The Show Must Go On
17. Bethlehem
18. Why Can't We
19. Where Were You
20. Already Gone
21. Better

Written by Jason Scheff

01. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
02. We Can Last Forever
03. What Kind of Man Would I Be
04. Runaround
05. If It Were You
06. What Does It Take
07. God Save the Queen
08. Man to Woman
09. Bigger Than Elvis
10. Mah Jongg
11. Let's Take A Lifetime
12. The Pull
13. King of Might Have Been
14. Caroline
15. Why Can't We
16. Love Will Come Back
17. Long Lost Friend
18. 90 Degrees and Freezing
19. Where Were You

Written by DaWayne Bailey

01. Stone of Sisyphus
02. Get On This

Written by Keith Howland

01. Back To You

Posted by Roy on Monday, 02.14.11 @ 13:13pm


THE CHICAGO ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
09. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 02.16.11 @ 06:51am


THE CHICAGO ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 02.26.11 @ 03:48am


jann wenner is a total dick. he could not carry Chicago's jock strap, and makes the rock and roll hall of fame as much of a joke as its location.

Posted by kj on Sunday, 02.27.11 @ 19:35pm


Nice piece and well said. Chicago gets nominated at the Committee level but has yet to receive enough votes to make the ballot.

-Sharon Uhl

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 03.1.11 @ 05:11am


FROM RECORD COLLECTOR MAGAZINE INTERVIEW WITH DANNY SERAPHINE

Why do you think critics never embraced Chicago?

They got us at first, but once we started having hits, that's when they started tearing us apart. Also, the band was really melodic and musical, not garage band-y, trashy, heavy rock. The critics didn't have that edginess to talk about. The critics gravitated towards edgier lyrics and music. There was also an ongoing feud with Rolling Stone magazine. It seemed everybody was getting on the cover and we were huge and they never put us on the cover. Jimmy Guercio, our producer/manager, was getting upset. He got into a feud with Jann Wenner, publisher of Rolling Stone, which kept us out of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The feud got out of hand and became nasty. Of course, we jumped on the bandwagon too and at every chance we could we said nasty things like, "We just sold four million records, and we wipe our ass with Rolling Stone." If it hurt us, we pretended it didn't, with bravado. It just got ridiculous, all the things that the magazine would write about us. I mean really, really bad reviews. But then you look at who they gave good reviews to. Where are a lot of these people today?

Make a case for Chicago's induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

I still think it has something to do with our feud with Rolling Stone magazine (the magazine's publisher Jann Wenner is on the Hall of Fame board). I don't think we've ever even been on the ballot. Chicago sold 130 million records, and maybe it's not all about sales, but our early records are beautifully crafted and great music. For me, it's a slap in the face to the fans and to the band too.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 03.10.11 @ 20:17pm


From Roy's induction speech:

"Good evening! Let me just preface by saying I have been informed that all living members of Chicago are here tonight; the current members, the former members, the ones being inducted and the ones who are not being inducted, and they will all be performing tonight as well at different points during the ceremony. So don't expect to see the drama of a Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Sex Pistols, Blondie or Van Halen. There isn't going to be any bullshit drama here tonight folks because it's only Rock 'n' Roll mthrfckrs!"

I stopped reading after that because it's clear that you are an idiot.

Posted by Stephano on Sunday, 03.13.11 @ 19:46pm


I changed the opening. Read on further. I posted another speech.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.13.11 @ 20:10pm


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 29 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 83 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 46 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 32 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!


THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.13.11 @ 20:18pm


THE PART I TOOK OUT

And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008 Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, and I smell a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 03.13.11 @ 20:25pm


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns versus a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on most of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Well, I don't know if that's how Chicago responded because I wasn't there in the room, but I'm pretty sure it was something along those lines because telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 25 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 75 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was the song "Colour My World," one of 35 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 33 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with the band now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970s on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 03.14.11 @ 19:22pm


http://www.showbiz411.com/2011/03/15/rock-hall-2011-eligible-only-guns-n-roses-would-make-the-cut

Showbiz 411 asks who will be inducted next. Vote on the right of the screen:

Kiss, Chicago or Bon Jovi are your options.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 03.15.11 @ 20:06pm


Actually, it's a poll asking how much I'd pay to meet Charlie Sheen. Anyway, I'd say Chicago will be last of those to be inducted.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 03.22.11 @ 09:55am


"Actually, it's a poll asking how much I'd pay to meet Charlie Sheen."

$0.00, baby.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 03.23.11 @ 03:41am


The poll changes daily

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 03.23.11 @ 06:45am


"In my opinion they are the worst snub for a group" - somebody way back when

Big snub? Sure. Biggest snub? Not by a long shot.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 03.23.11 @ 10:33am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, also had connections to the music industry. He moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns rather than a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as trombonist James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago II album, which was written and arranged by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, basically, the songs were made shorter because Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 25 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 75 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was "Colour My World," a portion from Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon, one of 35 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 33 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry from the 1982 Chicago 16 album.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce, as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, from the bands Honk and Firefall, who has been with Chicago now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970's on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! But number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! Yeah, that's right, Chicago couldn't top Elton John. And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008. Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, but I sense a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fcking time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 03.25.11 @ 21:22pm


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns rather than a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as trombonist James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years, but their approach to the horns changed from melodic to harmonic for the most part.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Chicago could not be pigeonholed. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" from the 1970 Chicago album (A.K.A Chicago II), which was written and arranged by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow. From it came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, basically, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, James Pankow and Lee Loughnane weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 25 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 75 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was "Colour My World," a portion from Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon, one of 35 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and the next Chicago band member I'm going to talk about...

Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't. During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 33 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry" from the 1982 Chicago 16 album, which was co-written and produced by David Foster.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce, as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

And finally, Chicago's backbone; its original drummer, Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, from the bands Honk and Firefall, who has been with Chicago now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970's on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! But number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! Yeah, that's right, Chicago couldn't top Elton John. And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008. Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, but I sense a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fcking time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 04.22.11 @ 11:21am


I am final, I am sorry, but, in my opinion, there is other way of the decision of a question.
It is a pity, that now I can not express - it is compelled to leave. But I will return - I will necessarily write that I think.
In it something is. Many thanks for the information. You have appeared are right.

Posted by stertorgo on Friday, 04.22.11 @ 11:49am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then In 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns rather than a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as trombonist James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years, but their approach to the horns changed from melodic to harmonic for the most part.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Chicago could not be pigeonholed. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" which was written and arranged by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow, from the 1970 Chicago album (A.K.A Chicago II). From "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, basically, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drums of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, Lee Loughnane, and James Pankow weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 25 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs". When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 75 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was "Colour My World," a portion from Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon, one of 35 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't.

During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 33 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! There is no comparison! As Arsenio Hall once told Peter Cetera, “Peter, you don’t sing—you siiiing!” “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry" from the 1982 Chicago 16 album, which was co-written and produced by David Foster.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce, as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

Chicago's original drummer; its backbone, was Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with Chicago now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970's on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! But number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! Yeah, that's right, Chicago couldn't top Elton John. And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008. Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, but I sense a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fcking time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions)
09. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
10. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.1.11 @ 06:34am


Was there any need to post that induction speech 3 times?

Posted by Sam on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 07:06am


Was there any need to post that induction speech 3 times?

Posted by Sam on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 07:06am

Yes, minor edits.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 13:43pm


Minor edits isn't enough reason, it's kinda annoying scrolling down here though what is essentialy the same, long thing three times.

Posted by GFW on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 16:32pm


"They don't give a damn about any trumpet playing band. It ain't what they call rock and roll."

Posted by joker on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 17:20pm


"They don't give a damn about any trumpet playing band. It ain't what they call rock and roll."

Posted by joker on Monday, 05.2.11 @ 17:20pm


HORN PLAYERS IN THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME

01. 1987 Louis Jordan
02. 1990 Louis Armstrong
03. 1993 Jerry Martini (Sly & The Family Stone)
04. 1993 Cynthia Robinson (Sly & The Family Stone)
05. 2000 King Curtis
06. 2002 Isaac Hayes
07. 2003 Steve Douglas
08. 2006 Herb Alpert
09. 2006 Miles Davis
10. 2008 Denis Payton (The Dave Clark Five)

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 05.3.11 @ 07:27am


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/exclusive-hear-chicagos-introduction-from-their-1975-tour-20110502

Rolling Stone Magazine

Chicago XXXIV : Chicago Live In '75

Exclusive: Hear Chicago's 'Introduction' from Their 1975 TourTrack will be released May 24th on the band's new archival disc 'Live In '75'

By ANDY GREENE
MAY 2, 2011 12:40 PM ET

Chicago have been playing state fairs and casinos for so long that it's easy to forget that back in the Seventies they were one of the biggest bands in the country. The group's popularity peaked around 1975, when they went on a massive co-headlining tour with the Beach Boys. Critics dubbed the package "Beachago" and Peter Cetera and Chicago's horn section even joined the Beach Boys during their encores. Chicago is revisiting this period with the release of Live In '75, which chronicles their set at Maryland's Capital Centre in June of 1975. Sadly, no tracks from the Beach Boys are on the disc - but it does feature Chicago covering "I'm A Man" and "Got To Get You Into My Life."

The disc hits stores on May 24th. Check out an exclusive stream of Chicago's opening number "Introduction."


READER COMMENTS

Chicago mentioned in Rolling Stone? Any moment now I'll see pigs flying by my window. Why is RS writing about Chicago? A band that for some reason has been blacklisted from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Also, one could argue that the group's popularity peaked with the release of Chicago 17 in 1984, which has gone on to sell more than six million copies.

Playing Casinos and State Fairs?!?!? This band tours every single summer since 1967 - count 45 summers! - and sells out major, prestigious venues. This year they have two nights in a row at Ravinia on Chicago's North Shore. They are the only headlining band to be playing two nights!

Andy, Get your head out of your rear, get your facts straight, and see a Chicago concert before you pen drivel like this!

Since this is on Rolling Stone.... Does this mean that Chicago will FINALLY be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame??? I know Rolling Stone has a lot to do with this decision.............??????

Where is the voice of social comment and dissent that Chicago brought to the masses, where is it today? Who speaks for the wrongs and ills done to the people?

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.5.11 @ 07:14am


http://rhinorecords.com/shop/product/chicago-live-in-75

Chicago XXXIV : Chicago Live In '75

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.5.11 @ 07:20am


http://www.rollingstone.com/news?page=3

Here is the Rolling Stone News page with Chicago listed with all the other issues.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.6.11 @ 06:29am


http://www.goldminemag.com/blogs/make-me-smile-induct-chicago-into-rocks-hall-of-fame

Chicago on Goldmine

(Seventh in a series on artists who should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, but are not)

Four members of the original Chicago appeared on Chris Isaak’s excellent show, which runs on Sundance. Isaak asked them point blank – and I paraphrase – “Just who did you piss off?”

Isaak’s query revolved around the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s failure to induct (or even nominate) the group that now ranks as the most popular – chartwise – the United States ever has produced. How can this be?

True, the still-active band may have overstayed its welcome, but from 1969 until Peter Cetera departed in 1985, there was nothing less than top quality work from this group, especially before the 1978 death of lead guitarist Terry Kath. With keyboardist Robert Lamm and the horn section of Walt Parazaider, Lee Loughnane and James Pankow carrying on, the group re-surfaced with a string of blockbuster hits in the late ’80s that garnered public approval but, evidently, proved too schmaltzy for critical blessing.

But Chicago’s initial core, which included Danny Seraphine on drums, gave us some of the most innovative works of the Rock era. Where The Buckinghams and Blood, Sweat & Tears introduced the concept of a horn section supplementing a basic rock group, Chicago was the group that avoided self-destruction and carried on, expanding Rock’s boundaries.

With Kath, supposedly Jimi Hendrix’ favorite guitar player, providing a raw edge, Chicago ran off 10 consecutive Top 10 albums from 1970 to 1977, including a string of five straight No. 1 LPs. Five straight No. 1 albums! Any artist who denies he or they would give his best Fender and Roland to get near the top of the album charts is an artist who has never gotten near the top of the album charts. This group topped the charts five times.

Several other offerings just missed the top, seven reaching the top 10, three of which were double albums and one which came 15 years after their debut. That is a truly unbelievable achievement and the original Chicago seven should be acknowledged by the Hall of Fame. Actually, a carryover from my original list 10 years ago, they should have been recognized long ago.

Though clearly an album-oriented group at the outset, with long, progressive pieces being the norm, the group still managed the ridiculous number of 20 singles to reach the top 10, three landing in the No. 1 position. In the United Kingdom, Chicago also was a regular presence on both album and single charts.

William Ruhlmann, writing in the “Allmusic Guide,” hits the nail right on the head, describing the group’s plight as follows “…Chicago has been singularly underrated since the beginning of its long career, both because of its musical ambitions (to the musicians, rock is only one of several styles of music to be used and blended, along with classical, jazz, R&B, and pop) and because of its refusal to emphasize celebrity over the music. The result has been that fundamentalist rock critics have consistently failed to appreciate its music and that its media profile has always been low. At the same time, however, Chicago has succeeded in the ways it intended to. From the beginning of its emergence as a national act, it has been able to fill arenas with satisfied fans. And beyond the impressive sales and chart statistics, its music has endured, played constantly on the radio and instantly familiar to tens of millions.”

Obviously, those in command of nominating artists feel the intelligence and taste of the majority of record buyers can be described using the same phrase that leads us to picture the rear portion of a horse. It would be nice if the Hall of Fame had the guts to reveal just who holds the public in such low esteem.

Or, as Isaak so elegantly stated to the remaining originals, “Just who did you piss off?”

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.8.11 @ 08:33am


http://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/02/11/why-arent-they-in-the-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-chicago/

Edge Induced Cohesion

Why Aren’t They In The Rock And Roll Hall of Fame: Chicago

Posted on February 11, 2011 by nathanalbright
Introduction

Chicago should be one of the no-brainer members of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. They had 5 #1 albums, 21 Top 10 hits on the billboard chart. Billboard ranks them as the #1 selling band of the 1970′s, and they rank second all time in American bands to the Beach Boys in terms of their success. They have 8 multi-platinum albums, 18 platinum albums, and 22 gold albums [1]. Let’s take a look at their contribution to Rock & Roll music, their career success, and why they have been snubbed by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Chicago’s Contribution

Chicago’s contribution to Rock & Roll was not an insignificant one. For one, they provided Rock & Roll with a template of how a strong producer can shape a band—both in the 1970′s with James William Guercio and in the 1980′s with David Foster. The band also was instrumental in adding jazz and latin sounds to Rock & Roll music in the early 1970′s, right along with other bands like Steely Dan and Santana in the same time period. They were also very important in their providing double disks of much of their work, especially their early work, and even releasing a 4 volume live set long before it became popular for bands like the Clash to release so many disks in the same album. Additionally, their albums Chicago XVI and XVII set the template for the sound of middle-of-the-road rock in the 1980′s. Additionally, the band had one of the epic “lost albums” in “Stone of Sisyphus,” an album with a legendary history like the “Chinese Democracy” or “Smile.” That combination of stellar success, importance as a model for other bands, and mysterious lost works says “Hall of Fame” to me.

Why Chicago Is A No-Brainer For The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

See the introduction. The band had hits in the 1960′s, 1970′s, 1980′s, 1990′s, and 2000′s. They have remained relevant and influential despite the change of time and personnel.

Notable Songs: “25 or 6 to 4,” “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It is?,” “Beginnings,” “Saturday In The Park,” “Feeling Stronger Everyday,” “Just You ‘N’ Me,” “Call On Me,” “Old Days,” “If You Leave Me Now,” “Baby What A Big Surprise,” “Hard To Say I’m Sorry,” “Hard Habit To Break,” “You’re The Inspiration,” “Will You Still Love Me?” “Look Away,” “What Kind of Man Would I Be,” “Here In My Heart”

Why Chicago Isn’t A Member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Voters fail to realize the daring nature of their musical vision and the jazzy quality of their original work and judge them for cheesy 1980′s romantic ballads. Additionally, the band gets less credit for their success than their producers have, and the fact that they were a template for 1980′s middle-of-the-road rock is held against them.

Verdict: Put these guys in—immediately. No one holds popular success against bands like the Beatles or the Beach Boys, so why hold it against Chicago?

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 05.8.11 @ 08:48am


MY ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTION SPEECH FOR CHICAGO

The year was 1966, and the place was Chicago's DePaul University. That was where a saxophone, clarinet, and flute player named Walter Parazaider got together with a drummer named Danny Seraphine, a guitar player and singer named Terry Kath, a trumpet player named Lee Loughnane, and a trombone player named James Pankow. Then in 1967, they met a piano player and a singer named Robert Lamm, from Chicago's Roosevelt University, who was performing at a local night club, and they asked him to join their band, which he did. The band would be called The Big Thing, and The Big Thing would play on the Midwest club circuit, building a following. An engagement during the second week of December 1967 proved to be an important gig. The Big Thing was an opening act at Barnaby's in Chicago for a band called the Exceptions, which was the biggest club band in the Midwest, and they stuck around and listened to them. If The Big Thing had stayed late to see the Exceptions, one of the Exceptions had come early to see The Big Thing. That night, singer and bass guitar player Peter Cetera would leave the Exceptions and join The Big Thing as its seventh member, and big things were about to happen.

James William Guercio, who had been a DePaul University student of music as well, moved the band out to Los Angeles and he would become their manager and producer. The Big Thing would become The Chicago Transit Authority, and then simply, Chicago. The plan from the beginning was to start a horn centered Rock and Roll band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section. A Rock and Roll band with horns that were an integral part of the music. A Rock and Roll band whose horn section formed the heart of the band. A Rock and Roll band with a horn section that was another lead voice dancing with the vocals. Chicago's use of brass and woodwinds was like no other band. They took what is called a "melodic" approach to the horns rather than a "harmonic" approach. The horns actually acted as an additional vocal line, not just performing fill rifts. This is what was innovative about Chicago. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, and a band way ahead of its time.

True to the need of the album-oriented rock format that launched them, the first four albums released by Chicago between 1969 and 1972 comprised three double albums and one quadruple album. That's 10 albums in three years. Chicago's next five albums: Chicago V, VI, VII, VIII, and IX all hit number one on the Billboard 200 Albums Chart. Chicago took America and the world by storm without the help of their faces. Total subjugation of individual ego to the collective good of the group was the rule in Chicago, even to the point of using a logo rather than a picture of the band on all of their album covers. Chicago refused to emphasize celebrity over the music. The group turned its anonymous, professional air into a virtue and a marketing strategy. They were the faceless band behind a logo. Chicago's logo and its facelessness were very much in keeping with the style of the late '60's that valued group effort over individual ego. The group would come to be identified by a logo, and that logo, designed by Nick Fasciano, would become the most famous logo in Rock and Roll history. Inspired by classical music, Chicago also chose to number most of their albums instead of giving them full names. As the 70's became the 80's and the demands of the music industry started to change, Chicago was dropped by their record label. During Chicago's search for a new record company, one label said to them, "If you get rid of the horn section we'll sign you," to which Chicago responded, "Go fck yourself!" Telling Chicago to get rid of the horn section is like telling Elton John to get rid of the piano, as trombonist James Pankow once said. Chicago would go on to sign with a new record label and the horns stayed and the band played on for forty more years, but their approach to the horns changed from melodic to harmonic for the most part.

Chicago's first 11 albums consisted of songs that were just under 10 minutes long, and songs and suites that were over 10 minutes long. These albums all showcased the impeccable musicianship of all the members of the band. At first, Chicago's sound was a hard sell. Radio stations wouldn't play their songs. Chicago's music was not easily identifiable what it was. Chicago could not be pigeonholed. Their sound met with resistance. Record executives turned to Guercio, and Guercio edited a number of Chicago's songs and suites to make them shorter and more radio friendly. It was a compromise to be on the radio, and it was what it was. You can still listen to all of the band's songs and suites in their entirety on all the early Chicago albums; it's the radio versions of the songs that are shorter. The first track that got edited was the 12-minute suite called "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" which was written and arranged by Chicago's trombonist James Pankow, from the 1970 Chicago album (A.K.A Chicago II). From "Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon" came two hits: "Make Me Smile" and "Colour My World." So, basically, the songs were made shorter because (as Robert Lamm so eloquently put it) Chicago's music wasn't for people with Attention Deficit Disorder. You know, because those are the people who listen to radio--people with A.D.D.

In 1969, Chicago released their first album, and to this day, it is considered to be one of the greatest groundbreaking albums ever produced in the history of Rock and Roll; that album being The Chicago Transit Authority. It was a blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock and roll. It included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar rock and roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. It was funky, melodic, emotive, politically intoned and avant-garde. I'm guessing most people in this room have never listened to The Chicago Transit Authority. You can not buy a Chicago greatest hits record and understand what I'm talking about, but there are so many people that I am speaking for tonight who know exactly what I'm talking about. When The Chicago Transit Authority was released in 1969, it seemed to be the perfect synthesis of everything that was diametrically opposed. It had smooth, lush harmonies, it had the distorted feedback-drenched guitar works of Terry Kath, it had the Beatles-meet-Motown bass works of Peter Cetera, it had the Buddy Rich-meets-Mitch Mitchell drum works of Danny Seraphine, it had the churning Hammond organ and classical piano works of Robert Lamm, and it had those powerful horns of Walter Parazaider, Lee Loughnane, and James Pankow weaving in and out of the arrangements, ending up toe-to-toe with everything else. And it all worked. The dynamics were perfect. The Chicago Transit Authority seemed to have everything in the right place. The horn section, the vocalists, and the rhythm section were tight and unified. Individually, the members of Chicago were all outstanding on their respective instruments. Unlike many bands of the era that utilized session musicians for their recordings, Chicago was completely self-contained.

Question: What do you get when you mix the voice of Ray Charles with the voice and the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix? The answer is Chicago's first lead singer and lead guitarist, Terry Kath. During his eleven years with Chicago, Terry Kath wrote 25 songs for the band. He had a soulful quality to his voice, and his guitar playing was considered to be better than the guitar playing of Jimi Hendrix. Jimi Hendrix himself asked Chicago to tour with him, which they did, after he heard them playing at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go in Los Angeles and said, "I'm pretty good man, but this Kath blows me away", "Your guitar player is way better than me, and the horns are like one set of lungs." When Jimi Hendrix says, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix, that means, Terry Kath is a better guitar player than Jimi Hendrix. In a group known for its horns, it was Terry Kath's hard edged guitar and soulful vocals that kept the band rooted in rock and roll. Chicago's line-up for such a large band was astonishingly stable, broken after eleven years and eleven albums only by the death of Terry Kath. After Terry Kath's tragic death in 1978, Chicago could have gone on to produce albums under a different name, they could have dissolved their band completely with each member going off to do other musical projects, or they could have just left the music business altogether and done other things with their lives, but they didn't. Chicago soldiered on for another forty years with the help of other notable lead rock guitarists, from Donnie Dacus and Chris Pinnick, to DaWayne Bailey and Keith Howland.

Chicago's second lead singer was Robert Lamm; an ambitious composer/pianist/keyboardist. Robert Lamm wrote 75 songs for Chicago (the most out of all the members in the group) and his songwriting talents made him the default leader of the band in the early years. The Robert Lamm-penned hits included, "Beginnings", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Questions 67 & 68", "Saturday in the Park" and "25 or 6 to 4". His clear baritone voice was an asset, as were his stylized keyboarding skills. The International press portrayed Robert Lamm as Chicago's social conscience, and many of his best songs ("Dialogue", "Free", "Harry Truman", "State of the Union") all espoused political themes. Some of Robert Lamm's compositions had a swing feel to them as well. Frank Sinatra could have handled "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" very well. Actually, as the story goes, it was "Colour My World," a portion from Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon, one of 35 Chicago songs that was written by the band's trombonist James Pankow, that Frank Sinatra wanted to do a remake of. It never happened though because Frank Sinatra wanted James Pankow to write a few more verses for the song, and James Pankow wouldn't do it. You don't mess with a classic, even if the chairman of the board himself asks you to. Other Chicago songs penned by James Pankow included the hits, Old Days, Just You 'n' Me, I've Been Searchin' So Long, and Feelin' Stronger Everyday. That last one, by the way, was written by James Pankow and Chicago's original bass guitarist and third lead singer, Peter Cetera; the elastic tenor voice who was brought in to hit the high notes and keep up with the horn section, which the baritone voice of Robert Lamm and the gruff voice of Terry Kath couldn't.

During his time with Chicago, Peter Cetera wrote 33 songs for the band, but if you were to ask any Chicago fan or Rock music historian to name the first two Chicago songs they think of when they hear someone say the name Peter Cetera, they will all tell you the same thing, what else but the smoochadelic classics, "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, and "Baby, What A Big Surprise" from the 1977 Chicago XI album. The sexiest, the sweetest, the most distinctive tenor voice in all of Rock And Roll history belongs to Peter Cetera mthrfckrs! “High above shimmering, echoing ballads and rock-solid choruses that aim for the bleachers, Cetera’s tenor voice soars like a bird in flight. If it doesn’t strike you deep in your heart, it’ll at least stick deep in your head.” That's what an unknown source from Rolling Stone magazine's website once said about Peter Cetera. Well Peter, I would like to tell you tonight on behalf of all your fans that your voice has actually done both for us. Your voice has struck us deep in our hearts and it is stuck deep in our heads and that is where we want it and that is how we like it! The two most covered Chicago songs of all time were Chicago's first two number one hits, both written by Peter Cetera: The Grammy award winning "If You Leave Me Now" from the 1976 Chicago X album, which I mentioned earlier, and "Hard To Say I'm Sorry" from the 1982 Chicago 16 album, which was co-written and produced by David Foster.

In May of 1985, after 18 years with the band, Peter Cetera left Chicago for a solo career. Let's just say that things got really ugly and Peter quit. It was like a divorce, as Peter would say, and that's all I'm going to say about that because it's none of my goddamn business. So, out walks Peter Cetera and in walks singer/songwriter and bass guitar player Jason Scheff, the son of Jerry Scheff, who was a bass guitar player for Elvis Presley. Jason Scheff has been with Chicago for over 25 years now and he has written 19 songs for the band's last 7 studio albums. Now, to tie this whole thing together, I have to take you back to 1981 because that was the year that singer/songwriter, keyboard player and guitarist, Bill Champlin, the lead singer of the late 60s and 70s psychedelic rock band, the Sons of Champlin, joined Chicago. During his 28 years with Chicago, Bill Champlin appeared on 9 of the band's studio albums and he wrote 21 songs for the band and his husky voice was the perfect complement to both, Peter Cetera, on the top 5 hit "Hard Habit To Break," from the 1984 Chicago 17 album, and Jason Scheff, on the top 5 hit "Will You Still Love Me" from the 1986 Chicago 18 album. Bill Champlin would go on to sing solo in 1988 on Chicago's third number one hit, the power-ballad, "Look Away" from the Chicago 19 album.

Chicago's original drummer; its backbone, was Danny Seraphine. During his 25 years with Chicago, Danny Seraphine wrote 18 songs for the band and he played drums in a style that, ironically perhaps, can best be described as lyrical. To be a good drummer one must develop his own technique. Good timing and good taste is essential, but it is the technique that sets the truly great drummers apart from the rest, as Danny Seraphine once said. In 1973, Chicago brought in percussionist Laudir De Oliveira from Sergio Mendez. For seven years, Laudir De Oliveira added Latin flare to the band's music and his percussion work was the perfect compliment to the drum work of Danny Seraphine. After 25 years with the band, let's just say a little more drama ensued, and Danny Seraphine was replaced by drummer Tris Imboden, who has been with Chicago now for over 25 years.

And that folks was Chicago. 50 years, 50 albums, 5 number one albums, 130 million albums sold worldwide, 50 hits, and 3 number one songs later, Chicago is being inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Now I am going to present you with information that will make your head spin. This must be stated! According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American Rock and Roll band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. The number one charting Rock and Roll band of the 1970's on both the Billboard Top 40 Albums Chart and the Billboard 200 Albums Chart was Chicago! But number one overall was none other than (who else) Elton John! Yeah, that's right, Chicago couldn't top Elton John. And now, ladies and gentlemen, the list of the Top 4 charting Rock And Roll bands of all-time on both, the Billboard 200 Albums Chart, and the Billboard 100 Singles Chart. They just happen to be the same four bands on both lists, so I'm only going to say this once. Are you ready?! I said, are you ready?! Wait, let me get into my dramatic announcer voice. Number 01. The Beatles! Number 02. The Rolling Stones! Number 03. The Beach Boys! And at Number 04., Chicago! And in case you are wondering who's at number 05., it's The Bee-Gees! And that says it all right there folks! And up until tonight, Chicago was the only band on those lists who had not been inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame yet. And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008. Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency, but Chicago the band isn't black, but they did play Rock and Roll, which stems from the blues, which is the music of black people as Jann Wenner said at the 2008 Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction ceremony in reference to the induction of Little Walter. Well, you know what they say, things always happen in threes, but I sense a conspiracy! All I have left to say is that it's about fckng time Chicago got inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame because this is Chicago mthrfckrs! This isn't Boston or Kansas, if you know what I mean! So, without any further ado, ladies and gentlemen, CHICAGO!!!

THE CHICAGO INDUCTEES

THE CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO WILL BE INDUCTED

01. Walter Parazaider (1967-Present: saxophone; clarinet; flute; songwriter)
02. Lee Loughnane (1967-Present: vocals; trumpet; flugelhorn; songwriter)
03. James Pankow (1967-Present: vocals; trombone; songwriter)
04. Robert Lamm (1967-Present: vocals; piano; keyboards; songwriter)
05. Terry Kath (1967-1978: vocals; guitar; songwriter)
06. Peter Cetera (1967-1985: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)
07. Danny Seraphine (1967-1991: drums; songwriter)
08. Bill Champlin (1981-2009: vocals; keyboards; guitar; songwriter)
09. Jason Scheff (1985-Present: vocals; bass guitar; songwriter)

THE CHICAGO MEMBERS WHO MIGHT BE INDUCTED

10. Laudir De Oliveira (1973-1980: percussions; songwriter)
11. Donnie Dacus (1978-1980: guitar; songwriter)
12. Tris Imboden (1990-present: drums)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 05.11.11 @ 06:20am


http://www.suntimes.com/news/marin/5352339-452/time-for-rahm-emanuel-to-take-reins-tackle-citys-problems.html

Time for Rahm Emanuel to take the reins, tackle city’s problems
CAROL MARIN cmarin@suntimes.com May 15, 2011 9:26AM

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‘Beginnings” . . .

The decision by Team Emanuel to have the rock band Chicago kick off this weekend’s inaugural festivities is a perfect and perfectly ironic choice.

The group, formed by DePaul students back in the ’60s, turned a 1969 hit called “Beginnings” into gold. Whether the Emanuel administration can convert its own beginnings into gold is the question.

“Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”

Time for Rahm to take the reins from Rich “If You Should Leave Me Now” Daley and tackle the multiple crises threatening the city.

“Questions 67 & 68” have to do with how the new mayor will backfill a gaping $650 million to $700 million budget hole. Or pull pension funds from the brink.

Dialogue Part 1 will require a continuous conversation with City Council. But already there’s a peace treaty between Emanuel and a political nemesis, Ed Burke, the most powerful alderman in the world.

Dialogue Part 2 remains a contentious conversation with the media. The nascent Emanuel administration takes the term “control freak” to stratospheric heights, attempting to limit questions, control topics and use access as a big stick to reward or punish an unruly press. Even Mayor Daley’ has noticed, cheerfully offering the other day that he always took questions.

“Colour My World” skeptical, but this situation won’t improve without a fight.

So let’s return to the music, shall we?

For decades, the band Chicago has traveled the world, carrying the name of this city wherever it went. Still, they are not without their music critics.

One is Jim DeRogatis of WBEZ-FM, a former Chicago Sun-Times colleague, who dubbed Chicago a “creaky nostalgia act and horn-driven schlock-meisters.”

Peter Schivarelli, the colorful and sometimes controversial former 43rd Ward superintendent and longtime manager of Chicago, naturally disagrees. And so do I.

After dozens of gold and platinum records and tens of millions of records sold, the group has scaled just about every mountain but one.

For 20 years, they’ve been eligible for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Yet, somehow, that honor has eluded them.

Some theorize — rightly or wrongly — that it has to do with Rolling Stone creator and driving force Jann Wenner blackballing them.

“Politics is in everything,” said Schivarelli, who didn’t want to throw brickbats when I reached him by phone Thursday.

Schivarelli knows politics. His first city job was on a garbage truck. Daley I made him ward superintendent, but he fell out of favor with Daley II.

He doesn’t know Emanuel but says he and most band members who were registered to vote here voted for him.

“I’d say we had about 75 percent turnout for him,” Schivarelli said with a laugh, reverting to the lingo of the ward boss he once was.

Asked if he had any guidance for the new mayor, Schivarelli said: “He has to realize people want him to be successful. A lot of people love the city, love livin’ there.”

They don’t, however, love underperforming schools, high property taxes or cutbacks in city services. All stand as profound challenges.

“Where Do We Go From Here?” That’s what Chicago asked in its second album.

Whatever the answer, it will be “No Saturday In the Park.”

But if the new mayor can’t move the needle and nothing seems to work, for diversion there’s always Kelsey Grammer, who is in town filming a TV sitcom called “Boss” about a fictional Chicago mayor.

Cheers!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.16.11 @ 11:22am


I think they are around #150 or so on my HoF induction list ,I think they might be higher on Charles' list.

I lost interest in them after '75,I'd put them in for their first five albums (except Carnegie Hall).

Even then,I still think their first album was/is their very best.

Posted by Underground Democrat on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 06:20am


Actually, they're #186 on my list of eligibles, and part of that was because of the massive popularity of their best albums during the early through mid-70s, a factor that won't be part of the equation next time I rank them. Artists who either cited Chicago as an influence or have covered their songs include Peter Cetera, of course, as well as Rufus, Stephen Malkmus (Pavement), Little River Band, Amy Grant, Air Supply, Leo Sayer, Rick Springfield, Toto and REO Speedwagon among others. The best I can say is that, influence wise, they're more influential than most acts, but compared to other influential acts, that list is slim pickings. I'd love to point to later horn driven acts like Oingo Boingo or Fishbone as having been influenced by Chicago, but the connection just isn't there as far as I can see. And their 80s output with all those Cetera ballads is horrid. For me, the best Chicago was what they created while Terry Kath was alive. After he died, Cetera drove them into an easy listening ditch that was on one hand very popular but on another hand made them lose all credibility. I hope you know this, but there is not a thing you said in that induction speech that almost all of the nominators would care about, with perhaps the singular exception of what Jimi Hendrix said about Terry Kath. The only nominator that might be swayed by that information is the newest one, Roy Trakin. He is all for Daryl Hall & John Oates, Bon Jovi and Neil Diamond, so Chicago is probably on his radar also.

Posted by Charles on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 06:23am


I am the exact right age to be a Chicago fan... I was so very cool with the horns in the Butterfield Blues Band when Bloomfield left and Bloomfield's Electric Flag. I loved the Al Kooper flavored first album of Blood Sweat and Tears. By the time Tower of Power was playing in my home area, I was in Texas, but I went to high school with Lydia Pense, and Cold Blood and ToP played together often so I picked up on both, loving Cold Blood completely. I always like James Brown's band whether the Famous Flames or the JBs, and listening to the Mar-Keys join Booker T & the MGs as both an instrumental group and as Otis Redding's backup band was always great. I think it started when I grew up listening to my mom's Glenn Miller and Dorsey Brothers records and I discovered Count Basie through Al Collins' Purple Grotto, leading me to Duke Ellington, Harry James, Gene Krupa, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Don Redman, Cab Calloway, Louis Jordan, and many many others.

But I never cared for Chicago. Listening to the Chicago Transit Authority double disc debut album, I felt like more than half of it was crappy filler. This proved true after they changed their name and kept issuing two disc albums with a nice song or three and acres of bland stuff. I was stationed with a Chicago fan who kept insisting that I should love them, I just needed to know which cuts to skip on every album. I told him then and I repeat it now: why not release a single disc LP with good stuff instead of overblown albums with a lot of mediocre filler?

I recognize their influence, but like them less than I like the non-Kooper BS&T.

And, I cited a number of other rock bands which were horn based who released singles and albums before CTA. Chicago was early, but I saw the Electric Flag and the revamped Butterfield band debut at Monterey (June 1967) as well as the Mar-Keys play there... and JB's band was playing rock years before that... Oh, did I mention Checkmates, LTD? You mentioned Ray Charles in your speech.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 06:25am


I am the exact right age to be a Chicago fan... I was so very cool with the horns in the Butterfield Blues Band when Bloomfield left and Bloomfield's Electric Flag. I loved the Al Kooper flavored first album of Blood Sweat and Tears. By the time Tower of Power was playing in my home area, I was in Texas, but I went to high school with Lydia Pense, and Cold Blood and ToP played together often so I picked up on both, loving Cold Blood completely. I always like James Brown's band whether the Famous Flames or the JBs, and listening to the Mar-Keys join Booker T & the MGs as both an instrumental group and as Otis Redding's backup band was always great. I think it started when I grew up listening to my mom's Glenn Miller and Dorsey Brothers records and I discovered Count Basie through Al Collins' Purple Grotto, leading me to Duke Ellington, Harry James, Gene Krupa, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Don Redman, Cab Calloway, Louis Jordan, and many many others.

But I never cared for Chicago. Listening to the Chicago Transit Authority double disc debut album, I felt like more than half of it was crappy filler. This proved true after they changed their name and kept issuing two disc albums with a nice song or three and acres of bland stuff. I was stationed with a Chicago fan who kept insisting that I should love them, I just needed to know which cuts to skip on every album. I told him then and I repeat it now: why not release a single disc LP with good stuff instead of overblown albums with a lot of mediocre filler?

I recognize their influence, but like them less than I like the non-Kooper BS&T.

And, I cited a number of other rock bands which were horn based who released singles and albums before CTA. Chicago was early, but I saw the Electric Flag and the revamped Butterfield band debut at Monterey (June 1967) as well as the Mar-Keys play there... and JB's band was playing rock years before that... Oh, did I mention Checkmates, LTD? You mentioned Ray Charles in your speech.

Posted by Cliff on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 06:26am


http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,1058168,00.html

Pavement Was Prog?
Stephen Malkmus talks about prog rock -- We chat with the ex-Pavement frontman about how his music is being classified with the newly-revived genre
By Tom Sinclair | May 09, 2005 | Entertainment Weekly

There's no denying the prog slant of much of Face the Truth, the new album from ex-Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus. While flirting with prog is nothing new for the arch and arty singer-guitarist, we wondered just how comfortable he is being lumped in with the new school of noodlers.

EW How does it feel when your music is described as prog?

SM I don't mind, although to me Radiohead is more a classic prog band. Our original drummer in Pavement was a big Yes fan.

EW Do you consider yourself a leader of the prog revival?

SM Maybe a band like the Mars Volta is, but most of our so-called progressive moves are still pretty blues- and acid-rock-related. We're kinda garagey. Not quite out there in chin-stroking-land.

EW Since '70s punk was partly a rebellion against bands like ELP, is it weird that punky bands are moving in that direction?

SM As the punks grow up, it's good to mess around with the forms. People might be getting tired of these Strokes-y bands, the Kings of Leons and the Jets, and wanting something else.

EW Who are your fave prog acts?

SM There's a band called the Groundhogs who made some kind of progressive albums. Soft Machine, at least through their third album, were classic. And early Chicago, when they were Chicago Transit Authority. I would say listen to those for sure.

EW Whoa. Steve Malkmus digs Chicago?

SM Hey, those first two records were amazing.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.30.11 @ 19:44pm


The possible candidates for giving the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago:

PREDECESSORS AND CONTEMPORARIES

The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Earth, Wind & Fire, America

FOLLOWERS

Huey Lewis
Chris Isaak
Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20
Steve Malkmus of Pavement
Trey Anastasio of Phish

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.30.11 @ 19:55pm


The possible candidates for giving the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago:

PREDECESSORS AND CONTEMPORARIES

The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Earth, Wind & Fire, America

FOLLOWERS

Huey Lewis
Chris Isaak
Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters and Nirvana
Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20
Steve Malkmus of Pavement
Trey Anastasio of Phish

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.30.11 @ 20:19pm


The possible candidates for giving the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago:

PREDECESSORS AND CONTEMPORARIES

The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Earth, Wind & Fire, Bruce Springsteen, America

FOLLOWERS

Sting
Huey Lewis
Chris Isaak
Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters and Nirvana
Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20
Steve Malkmus of Pavement
Trey Anastasio of Phish

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 06.2.11 @ 21:57pm


FLUTE ROCK

Ray Thomas (The Moody Blues)
Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull)
Peter Gabriel (Genesis)
Walter Parazaider (Chicago)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 06.4.11 @ 09:02am


You post enough of your weird-assed fantasy crap all over the place.

Posted by Kid on Saturday, 06.4.11 @ 09:07am


The possible candidates for giving the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago:

PREDECESSORS AND CONTEMPORARIES

The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Earth, Wind & Fire, Bruce Springsteen, America

FOLLOWERS

UB40
Sting
Billy Joel
Huey Lewis
Chris Isaak
Dave Matthews
Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters and Nirvana
Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20
Steve Malkmus of Pavement
Trey Anastasio of Phish

Posted by Roy on Monday, 06.6.11 @ 16:49pm


The possible candidates for giving the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame induction speech for Chicago:

PREDECESSORS AND CONTEMPORARIES

The Beach Boys, The Bee-Gees, Earth, Wind & Fire, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, America

FOLLOWERS

UB40
Sting
Huey Lewis
Chris Isaak
Dave Matthews
Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters and Nirvana
Taylor Hawkins of Foo Fighters
Rob Thomas of Matchbox 20
Steve Malkmus of Pavement
Trey Anastasio of Phish

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.7.11 @ 18:47pm


http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/news.php?id=82248

Something Else! Interview: Bill Champlin, Formerly of Chicago

SOURCE: SOMETHING ELSE!, Published: 2011-06-02
By Nick DeRiso

Bill Champlin, who co-founded the legendary Bay Area band the Sons of Champlin, is perhaps best known for his nearly three decades as a member of Chicago. But he had already collected a pair of Grammy awards before joining Chicago, first for “After the Love Is Gone" (a hit for Earth, Wind and Fire) and then for “Turn Your Love Around" (George Benson).

Chicago, meanwhile, was a shadow of the group that had once reeled off a string of 12 platinum and multi-platinum albums. The 1978 death of original guitarist Terry Kath had thrown Chicago into a tailspin that it didn't pull out of commercially until Champlin brought in producer David Foster prior to the release of Chicago 16. Champlin would eventually become the face of the band, singing lead on three of the four hit singles from Chicago 19. That included the chart-topping “Look Away," which ranked No. 1 on Billboard's 1989 year-end Hot 100.

By 2008, however, Champlin and the group seemed to be going in opposite directions. He was at work on a new solo album, even as Chicago trudged on—having released just three albums of original material during the previous 20 years. Champlin had been reduced to a single feature spot during recent tour stops. Chicago, still on the road, announced Champlin's sudden departure as he celebrated 2008's well-received No Place Left To Fall.

Champlin, in the latest SER Sitdown, makes it clear that he didn't quit. “I was fired two days after the American release of my album," he told us. “It made me look like an assh—le that I would walk away in the middle of the tour. I had no idea that would happen, though I should have seen it coming. It was a lot of things."

He went on to discuss fond memories from his tenure, making an emotional argument for the work Foster did in reviving the Chicago franchise, as well as key early influences and his new plans to form a family band:

Nick DeRiso: You won a 1979 Grammy for best R&B song for co-writing the hit “After the Love is Gone," with Jay Graydon and David Foster, later made popular by Earth, Wind and Fire. Within a couple of years, you and Foster were both working with Chicago.

Bill Champlin: A lot of people thought he brought me into Chicago, but it was other way around. I told the band: 'You've got to be ready to throw every song you have away. It's got to be good songs, or he's not involved.' That's when things started to change; that's when they started to hate him. But Foster really put some life back in that band. Everything he touches is awesome. I don't hang with him very much, but that guy's a bad boy—one of the best piano players on the planet.

DeRiso: David Foster's involvement signaled a dramatic change in the sound and feel for the band, away from experimental jazz-rock and into more mainstream pop. I get the feeling that you're proud of what you guys put out during that period, despite the way it's been critically reviled.

Champlin: Look, the blend of vocals, mostly on 16, was f—king awesome. We sounded great together. And the combination of all of that, on 16 and 17, it just took off. Of course, pretty soon (original singer/bassist Peter) Cetera started getting all of the attention. When it got person-oriented, he said they fired him, too. When you get around really big bands, you see that insecurity runs the whole thing. They were riding on our coattails—Cetera, David Foster, me. As far as they are concerned, I didn't have anything to do with it, but I'll stand up for our five Top 10 hits.

[ONE TRACK MIND: Former Chicago singer Bill Champlin finds something lived-in and comfy with “Tuggin' On Your Sleeve"—this home-cooked kind of soul.]

DeRiso: In 1997, you revived Sons of Champlin, your old high school band. Later, the economic downturn slowed things up. Are you ready to tour again?

Champlin: I'm bailing on the Sons. It just doesn't work anymore. We're looking at doing a family band, with me and (wife) Tamara and (son) Will. We're just going to call it Champlin. I'll probably play a few of the tunes that I am more known for, some Chicago stuff, some stuff from the Sons. We've already gone to Japan and Iraq; we just got back from playing for the troops. Next, we're going to do some stuff with Max Weinberg (of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band).

DeRiso: You're a Bay Area guy, but it seems you came more out of the James Brown or Sly and the Family Stone groove rather than the local folk-based hippie vibe of the Airplane and the Dead. How'd you get there?

Champlin: I saw James Brown for the first time when I was a sophomore in high school, and that was the end of that. We started coming from an R&B place. We threw jazz into the ball game. Then we started listening to the Beatles and Bob Dylan, and we tried to write lyrics that said more. Next, Sly Stone came up, and he was doing all of that, too. He was so good, they just took off. When the Stand album came out, it was a monstrous hit. It changed everything.

DeRiso: I remember hearing that Will called the Bill Champlin sound “steely swamp"—a combination of rootsy R&B and Steely Dan. That seems fitting.

Champlin: I think he got it pretty much right, though Steely Dan got to a point where they took it too far. Look, when it comes to (pianist Dave) Brubeck, I love that too, but then it got to where you could hear the jazz influences more than I particularly like. There's something about an R&B feel, though. I love that kind of music.

DeRiso: That leads me to “Blues in the Night," a showcase for your gritty vocal style on Chicago's Night and Day: Big Band from 1995. As good as it is, loose and R&B soaked, it almost doesn't fit.

Champlin: I almost got fired for doing that. (Laughs.) When I first heard about the big-band project, I thought we could do some Count Basie stuff, some Thad Lewis. No, they were talking mostly Henry James and Glenn Miller. I said, 'Oh, Jesus, go to the whitest thing you could find!' I went after what I could, tried to find something that felt a little deeper. It's kind of an homage to Little Milton, if you listen to it. He tore the sh—t out of that song. When it came down to the blues, he was a great guitarist—but also a serious singer.

[SOMETHING ELSE! REWIND: Travel back now, to those thrilling days of roman numerals and Terry Kath. Here are five hand-picked sides from Chicago's pre-guilty pleasure era.]

DeRiso: “Look Away," featuring a Diane Warren lyric and none of Chicago's signature horns, would become the band's third, and last, No. 1 hit, but has since been derided for being so disconnected from the band's classic sound. What's your take?

Champlin: Those moments were way, way earlier with Chicago. Some of the guys in the band don't want to cop to it that David Foster was ever involved. They think people are coming for “Saturday in the Park," but that wasn't what we were by then. “Look Away" got them a hit when they needed one. It was a giant Diane Warren song—not my favorite song, but there's nothing wrong with it. It put the band back on the map. I sang them back onto the charts.

DeRiso: Ultimately, Chicago has evolved into a band that seems to be endlessly touring, rather than redrawing their own legacy through new songs. Clearly, after recording four solo records in the 1990s, you were itching to do more creatively.

Champlin: They were only using one or two new songs here and there, and mostly re-releasing older stuff. When I got in, I felt there was a striving for excellence. I tried to remind them, you know, isn't this what it's supposed to be about? So, they fired me. I don't blame them, in a lot of ways. I was swimming upstream.

[TOMORROW: Bill Champlin discusses five key tracks from across his Grammy-winning career, including Chicago's “Hard to Say I'm Sorry," Earth Wind and Fire's “After the Love is Gone" and his bluesy theme song for TV's “In the Heat of the Night."]
Continue reading...

This story appears courtesy of Something Else!.
Copyright © 2011. All rights reserved.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.7.11 @ 22:06pm


http://somethingelsereviews.com/2011/03/31/something-else-featured-artist-chicago/

— March 31, 2011 6:08 am
Something Else! Featured Artist: Chicago

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.7.11 @ 22:10pm


http://somethingelsereviews.com/2011/03/31/something-else-featured-artist-chicago/

— March 31, 2011 6:08 am
Something Else! Featured Artist: Chicago
Posted by Something Else! Reviews

Fans of their initial music could be forgiven for barely recognizing Chicago by the 1980s, as fussy power ballads eventually flushed out the band’s signature horn sound. A group that had built its reputation on organic experimentation, a kind of prog-fusion that earned heavy rotation on a then-new FM radio format, never returned to the album-length suites that once defined it.

Well, we have. Often.

Travel back now, to those thrilling days of roman numerals and Terry Kath. Oh, and look for a special contribution, as well, from our friend Charlie Ricci of www.Bloggerhythms.com, a big Chicago fan. Here are five hand-picked sides, from their pre-guilty pleasure era …

“CRITIC’S CHOICE” (CHICAGO VI, 1973): Chicago’s early success has drawn its fair share of detractors (most notably Rolling Stone magazine), who probably just didn’t know what to make of the band’s progressive often intense blends of rock, blues jazz and R&B. Plus, horns in a rock band? Harumph, that’s just sacrilege!

As the band’s conscience and main songwriter up through Chicago V, Robert Lamm understandably took attacks against his band as attacks against his own artistry. Thus, he opens up VI in dramatic fashion: by performing
a blistering screed against those critics armed with just his soft vocal and a piano. Oh sure, the song is a gentle number played as Lamm’s hits discreet chords with no embellishments. But listen to the lyrics as his voice echoes throughout the studio when he first pleads (“What do you want?/I’m givin’ everything I have/I’m even trying to see if there’s more”) and then flips them off (“What do you need?/Is it someone just to hurt/So that you can appear to be
smart/ And keep a steady job/Play god, play god/What do you really know”). Lamm’s got a bone to pick, and he doesn’t hold back.

That he performed this one alone sent the message that this was personal between him and his maligners, and the song itself brought on even more criticism that Lamm is thin-skinned. But Lamm did his best work when he was pissed off at something, whether it was Vietnam, the ecology or Richard Nixon. With a pretty melody and a calm voice, “Critic’s Choice” in hindsight seemed to mark the end of his “angry young man” era, replaced with a Chicago that was still good, but not quite the great band it once was. – S. Victor Aaron

“NOW THAT YOU’VE GONE” (CHICAGO V, 1972): It’s hard to pick my favorite song by Chicago, but one of their top five all-time best studio performances is also one that is totally unknown outside of their hardcore fan base. It’s trombonist Jim Pankow’s “Now That You’ve Gone” from their 1972 album, Chicago V. Pankow wrote many quality pop songs for the septet. Most of his work was not considered avant-garde or even alternative but he knew how to write music that didn’t pander to the masses.

“Now That You’ve Gone” rocks hard. You get an excellent hint that this is going to be a high-octane piece of music from the very first moment with Danny Seraphine’s opening drum sequence. The brass charges in and then Terry Kath’s perfect, soulful vocal takes off from there. After the primary arrangement is finished, Seraphine’s floor tom-tom opening returns while Lee Loughnane’s trumpet and Pankow’s trombone serve as a solid bedrock for Walt Parazaider’s powerful, frantic, scorching, almost atonal sax solo on top. It’s one of the section’s greatest moments and it’s a surprise coming from Pankow. The raucous finish is one of his rare, out-of-mainstream moments that actually sounds like it came from the mind of the band’s other great composer, Robert Lamm.

Pankow’s arrangement is spectacular and features the horn section in all of its wonderful glory. For those of you who think that Chicago was just a ballad band in the 1980s, listen to this song. It’s a great example of what they originally stood for. – Charlie Ricci, Bloggerhythms

“MOTHER” (CHICAGO III, 1971): In 1971, Marvin Gaye had a song out about the ecology, and so did Chicago. But while Gaye sang about sang about man’s damage to the environment on “Mercy, Mercy Me,” Chicago expressed their angst mostly through instrumental prowess. More to the point, it’s a varied set of emotions as filtered through James Pankow’s trombone.

The song is very carefully crafted and typical of Chicago of that time: There’s a bunch of devices and nuances unheard of in a rock band. Robert Lamm offers a verse in a strident 4/4 pace, sounding like a car going down a freeway as he sings “driving down the concrete beams/Looking around and it now seems/Mama Earth is nowhere, gone from your eyes.” But the message comes across louder as the Lee Loughnane/Walter Parazaider/Pankow horn section runs through a transitional chart into a 5/8 section.

Resembling, per guitarist Terry Kath, “industry, money making and pollution,” Pankow duels frivolously with … Pankow. A double trombone solo with one dubbed over the over, the jousting ‘bones moan, sigh, and agitate though this pivotal middle section. An abrupt horn blast from all three brass players returns the song to the second and last verse. The final line — “pur Mother has been raped and left to die in disgrace/she is gone” — opens the way for Pankow’s second solo, a sublimely sorrowful set of phrases that puts the right feeling behind Lamm’s grieving words.

Without the message, the song is a fusion cut that would rank right up there with some mighty heady competition of its time. With the message comes the feel that was often lacking in fusion. “Mother” was a song that only Chicago was in a position to pull off convincingly. – S. Victor Aaron

“A SONG FOR RICHARD AND HIS FRIENDS” (CHICAGO V, 1972): When I go back and listen to Chicago at Carnegie Hall, I’m struck by the essential weirdness that Peter Cetera was actually in that band. This was no 1980′s power-ballad machine, not in the least. The Carnegie hall record documented the group at the height of their Chicago Transit Authority-through-Chicago III powers. Long before the schmaltz took over, there were snarling guitars, blistering horns, and passionate (if incredibly stoned) vocals.

And what would good, solid classic rock be without a little political zing? “A Song For Richard And His Friends” wishes away President Nixon with ominous & angular horn lines and a huge dose of Terry Kath’s guitar brutality. You get a few moments of hope when the band begins to swing after Kath’s spot, but then we end with more brooding horns.

This tune didn’t land Chicago on Nixon’s famous Enemies List. But it should have! – Mark Saleski

“JUST YOU ‘N ME” (CHICAGO VI, 1973): This lightly swinging No. 4 hit was one of a pair of Top 10 compositions for James Pankow on VI — along with the more muscular “Feeling Stronger Every Day,” which was co-written by Peter Cetera. (Muscular, and Cetera in the same sentence? Yeah, we’re talking a long time ago.) If only Chicago had continued to make ballads that strived for this level of inventiveness. Heck, any inventiveness. Sure, “Just You ‘N Me” sounds, at least on first blush, like every slow-jam that Chicago seemed somehow destined to do. Except that, rather than getting closed in by a wall-of-David Foster-fiddles, the tune lifts off at its middle into a jazzy interlude.

Critics, at the time, lambasted the band for trading in magnum opuses for the pureed digestibility of pop music. Well, as they say, you ain’t seen nothing yet. In retrospect, this track is a canny melding of Chicago’s first and second styles, incorporating some of the improvisational elements that defined the band’s double-album days with the glib easy-listening vibe of its chart-topping later period. Pastoral, plainly romantic, and still passably experimental, “Just You ‘N Me” draws a straight line to where Chicago is headed — that sound you hear, as the song fades, is “If You Leave Me Now” coming around the bend — only, thankfully, blessedly, they’re not there yet.

Recommended for those who grew up listening to the blow-dried 1980s-era version, but want to explore backward. “Just You ‘N Me” provides a steady bridge to their earlier persona as inspired fusion-minded hipsters. – Nick DeRiso

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.7.11 @ 22:23pm


My sympathies to Mr. Lamm. As for the rest of the album, it should by now be clear that Chicago has become the primary prisoner of its own image. In trying so hard to act the role of the "hippest-dudes on the planet," they have only succeeded in caricaturing themselves through overbearing pledges of allegiance to the freak-flag of Hippiedom. It's sad that the group has yet to realize the correlation between their actions and the critical response they generate, but sadder still is the fact that many of the folks who chuckle at them haven't taken the time to differentiate between the group's right-on buffoonery and the music that accompanies it.

If they did, they'd find that they probably had Chicago pegged wrong all along. The Windy City boys may have tried to come on hipper-than-thou, but after their exceptional debut album their produce has in fact been strictly MORsville. Not that this should be taken as an excuse for shoddy musicianship, it's just that when people come to grips with where Chicago is really at musically, it's a lot easier to understand them.

Chicago VI contains two more-or-less outstanding commercial ditties, either of which would improve the average radio playlist a hundredfold. Terry Kath's "Jenny" is a real treat. Its simplicity is refreshing -- guitar, bass, drums and the pedal steel of J.G. O'Rafferty thrown in for good measure -- and the results are a complete success. An ethereal ballad about the love between man and dog, it's so straightforward that it transcends the corniness of the subject.

Peter Cetera's "In Terms of Two" is similarly successful, its major attraction being the youthful harp-blowing of an unidentified harmonicat. It gives direction to the song's otherwise mechanical rhythmic backing and serves as a focus for listener accessibility. Cetera's lyrical arrangement is commendable: He returns to the phrase "in terms of two" not out of repetition but as a restatement of the song's major theme. Once again it's the simple honesty of this song that pulls it through, a quality too much in absence from the rest of Chicago VI.

The other six songs are nearly indiscernable variations of what has by now come to be known as the "Chicago Formula." Pretentious "we gotta get it together" lyrics, muddled musical arrangements and a mix that lacks specific direction are rolled into a glib and slick package, that seems devoid of emotional involvement on the part of the band.

It's doubtful as to whether Chicago will ever return to playing the kind of music that graced their first album. Now that was progressive! So all you folks out there had might as well hunker down and get to know Chicago for what they really are -- a bunch of well-meaning guys who mean no harm to anyone. If they want to kid themselves about being anything other than rock & roll Doc Severinsens, it's fine with me. Take their music for what it's worth; after all, it's the middle of the road that makes the edges possible.

- Gordon Fletcher, Rolling Stone, 8/16/73.

This band continues to progress in terms of musical expansion. Once it was the first band in the shadow of Blood, Sweat and Tears, combining rock tempos with jazz solos. Now it has become more vocally oriented, offering a pastoral sound that leads into temporal solos. It's nice to hear the sound of the horns, of course, but they aren't overpowering. All instruments play with a controlled exuberance, but it is the strength of the ensemble singing that shines through. "In Terms Of Two" almost sounds like a Gilbert O'Sullivan inspirational effort, with a harmonica adding a new trill to the band's blowing abilities. Best cuts: "Feelin' Stronger Every Day," "Hollywood," "Just You 'N' Me."

- Billboard, 1973.

Chicago demostrates all its strength here, turning in one of its great ballads in "Just You 'N' Me" and one of its great rockers in "Feelin' Stronger Every Day." Elsewhere, the group takes on its negative reviews in "Critics' Choice" and acknowledges the impact of L.A. stardom on a bunch of Midwestern kids in "Something In This City Changes People." * * *

- William Ruhlmann, The All-Music Guide to Rock, 1995.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 06.8.11 @ 05:52am


http://somethingelsereviews.com/2007/04/20/deep-cuts-chicago-a-hit-by-varese-1972/

— April 20, 2007 5:00 am
Deep Cuts: Chicago, “A Hit By Varèse” (1972)
by S. Victor Aaron

Fewer bands in rock have been more unjustly maligned than Chicago. Now, I’m no fan of the David Foster years, but being responsible for some of the shlockiest pop of that era doesn’t diminish the more innovative and ambitious output of the seventies, especially those first five albums.

And paying the bills have allowed the band to continue touring and recording for forty years; if you want to go see a classic slice of AM radio like "Make Me Smile" performed by the original band with most of the original players, you only need to wait for them to show up in your town and buy a ticket. You can't say that about many well-known rock bands today, much less one with a three part horn section.

From the mid seventies until his departure about a decade later, bassist Peter Cetera was the focal point of the group as he increasingly took on the lead vocal role for chart topping ballads. But before then, Chicago was very much a collective, where the stars were often that horn section, unmatched in all of rock except maybe Blood, Sweat and Tears (and still intact and potent today). Vocal duties were shared by Cetera, the late, great guitarist Terry Kath and keyboardist Robert Lamm. However, behind the scenes, the main guy driving the musical direction of the band was Lamm.

Lamm's compositions comprised the bulk of Chicago's early material, and not surprisingly, the early hits. "25 or 6 To 4", "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?", "Beginnings", "Free" were all his compositions, as well as notable album cuts like "Dialogue (Pts. 1 & 2)."

After an unbelievable four double lp's in a row — made more incredible in that they all went gold and spun off eight hits — came Chicago's first single player, 1972's Chicago V. This is the album that contains Lamm's biggest hit to that point, the perennially catchy "Saturday In The Park" and his peaking songwriting skills dominate much of the album, making V one the group's very best releases of all time.

The song the kicks off V is, as noted by the title, a tribute to French-born classical composer Edgar Varèse, whose works are greatly admired by Lamm and other members of Chicago.

Frank Zappa was famously a huge fan from the time he was a teenager, and he turned other open-minded rock musicians like Chicago on to Varèse. Varèse had his fans among guys like Zappa and Lamm because he was a 20th century classical composer who experimented with creating new ways to present rhythms and timbres and was one of the first to incorporate electronic instruments. In fact, he is often referred to as the “Father of Electronic Music”.

In his own words (from the Chicago V liner notes), Lamm stated that Varèse’s music “really kind of set us free in terms of what was possible musically. And so what I was trying to say in ‘A Hit by Varèse’ was ‘Wouldn’t it be great if music this free could actually be accepted on radio — not just by the programmers, but by the people listening?’”

Lamm, who undertook the vocal duties himself, wrote fairly brief and straightforward lyrics to express those sentiments:

Something to move me
Remove me and groove me, you want to know why?
I’m so tired of oldies
And moldies and goldies, that I want to cry

While the song's lyrics spoke about a desire for less conventional music, the music behind it is meeting that desire with shifting meters, chromatic harmonic structures and sizzling dueling solos among all three of the horn players: Lee Loughnane (trumpet), James Pankow (trumpet) and Walter Parazaider (sax). Terry Kath's feedback that opens the song before it really starts mimics the opening of Steppenwolf's "Magic Carpet Ride", while Cetera's melodic bass is supple and even adventurous (an aside: Cetera, like Sting, is an outstanding bassist who sumerged his instrumental prowess in favor of singing songs that aren't that demanding of their musicianship. I miss the old versions of both of these guys).

Being that 1972 was during the golden age of Yes, King Crimson and Emerson, Lake and Palmer, it might be easy to accuse Lamm of following their lead, but one listen of 1969's Chicago Transit Authority dispels the notion the he and his band were latecomers to jugular rock. While far from unlistenable, “A Hit By Varèse” is definitely not something that radio programmers even in the relatively freewheeling early seventies would provide airplay for as eagerly as "Saturday In The Park," but it's one of the better examples of what this band was capable of, in terms of both of songwriting and playing chops.

Over the succeeding years, Lamm's dream of freer forms of music being widely accepted on the radio not only was no closer to reality, it became more and more elusive. Chicago went on to even greater commercial success but the cost of the success was that the band's visionary and best songwriter gradually withdrew from a prominent role; fresh ideas and risk-taking soon disappeared.

The man who complained "I'm so tired of oldies" wrote a very oldie sounding "Harry Truman" a mere three years later; he could no longer fight the disinterest toward the loftly ideals of his hero Edgar Varèse. But when Robert Lamm was in a fighting mood, he could make some damned good music. As in "A Hit By Varèse."

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 06.8.11 @ 06:04am


http://www.futurerocklegends.com/blog_files/A_Case_for_Chicago.html

A Case for Chicago
June 06, 2008 12:05 AM Filed in: Snubbed

Phil Gallo, over at Variety, discusses whether or not Chicago and the Doobie Brothers should be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He argues that Chicago deserves it, but the Doobies don't (but he never really states why not).
His case for Chicago:

Chicago... were revolutionaries. "CTA," "Chicago," "III," "V," "VI" and "XI" pushed the limits on conceptual boundaries and displayed superb musicianship. And they had hits, which has somehow been labeled as a sin over time.

I have been appalled by the acts that have made it in ahead of them. It shows the bias of the hall's voters - they are either too old to have the wistful childhood memories of the early '70s or too young to fully appreciate how distinctive they were in the pop landscape at the time. Chicago made a difference back then.

Both Chicago and the Doobies are fan favorites, but each have been eligible for over 10 years without a single nomination, so they have to be considered long shots for future induction until the Rock Hall reconsiders the 70's.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 06.8.11 @ 06:08am


http://weblogs.variety.com/thesetlist/2008/06/adding-transpar.html

Adding Transparency To A Critical Process: Giving Chicago Its Proper Place In The Rock 'n' Roll Canon

Chicago and the Doobie Brothers perform two shows this week at the Gibson Amphitheatre, yet another summer tour double bill that has made Chicago one of the strongest B.O. attractions at amphitheaters over the last several years.

Previous years have featured Earth, Wind & Fire, America and Huey Lewis & the News, but this year's trek will bring Chicago fans in contact with a set of fans who have something in common: An feeling that their band is being unfairly snubbed by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Well one side is right, despite there being a number of striking parallels. Both acts came of age in the early 1970s playing distinctive music that had only a modicum of a link to a 1960s sound; both had minor hits with covers, Chicago doing Spencer Davis Group's "I'm a Man" and the Doobies with the Byrds' "Jesus is Just All Right"; they had success using different vocalists; and their signature sound at the end of the decade bore little resemblance to the sound they started with. At various times in the 1970s, they were among the five most popular bands in the U.S.
The Doobies, out of San Jose in Northern California, delivered magical harmonies and a blueprint for rock music that drew on a range of elements; few acts fused hard rock and boogie with a front porch sensibility so convincingly; you can't tell me that the Dave Matthews Band does not rely on a similar formula.

Chicago, on the other hand, were revolutionaries. "CTA," "Chicago," "III," "V," "VI" and "XI" pushed the limits on conceptual boundaries and displayed superb musicianship. And they had hits, which has somehow been labeled as a sin over time.

Any kid who studied an instrument in the early 1970s saw the songs of Chicago and the Doobie Brothers as worthy challenges that once commanded, were sources of pride Both had exceptional, gifted guitarists though Chicago's Terry Kath has never received his true due while Jeff Baxter's talent have been thoroughly examined. The horn section and the key songwriter, Robert Lamm, still lead Chicago, which can still impress in concert when they step away from the wall of hits and proffer their more adventurous music; the Doobies less so.
Endurance does not win prizes in the performing arts -- until the creators are beyond retirement age. Chicago could have called it quits after Kath's death and let their 10 or so studio albums be the entirety of their catalog or they could have imploded in the early 1980s when MTV started shaping pop music and examples of '70s excess were tossed aside. They not only soldiered on, they reinvented their sound, creating a new mainstream sound for adults. Not my cup of tea musically, but an achievement nonetheless.

Rhino Records will release on June 17, "Stone of Sisyphus (XXXII)," the album Chicago turned in to Warner Bros. in 1993 that the label refused to release. Produced by Peter Wolf, it was a return to the adventurousness of their early '70s output and was deemed not commercial enough. The guys in the band packed their things and left WB at that point, but have never seen fit to release this work.

I was a fan of the band between the ages of 11 and 16 - basically the classic "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" through "Wishing You Were Here" - and was hired to write liner notes for their boxed set and few reissues in 2003. It feels far enough removed that I can return to writing about the band critically, which I have begged off for the last several years. Material on the boxed set, by the way, emphasized their deft compositional abilities, specifically the manner in which they used 20th century classical technique.

In the years since I wrote those liner notes - and I went in thinking the band had been under-appreciated critically and deserving of the Hall of Fame - I have been appalled by the acts that have made it in ahead of them. It shows the bias of the hall's voters - they are either too old t have the wistful childhood memories of the early '70s or too young to fully appreciate how distinctive they were in the pop landscape at the time. Chicago made a difference back then.
Having taken in mostly theater since returning from Cannes ("Chorus Line," "Jersey Boys"), my one concert was Cher, leaving me with 69 concerts and 181 acts to go on the path to 100/300. At least summer is here.

Posted at 04:31 PM in Year in A Critical Life | Permalink

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 06.8.11 @ 06:11am


And you know what's funny? First, a Chicago politician named Barack Obama is elected the first black President of the United States of America in 2008. Then, in 2010, the National Hockey League's Chicago Blackhawks win their fourth Stanley Cup in franchise history, but their first Stanley Cup since 1961, the year of Barack Obama's birth. Then, what do you know, Chicago, the band, is finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 20??, during a Barack Obama presidency.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 05.11.11 @ 06:20am

Also, "Chicago" has seven letters and had seven members, till a game of rumored Russian Roulette. Then there were six, just like six letters in "Barack", who is an "ally" of Russia. Keeping one's nuclear rivals close can be seen as a six-lettered gamble itself, and gambling was born of the Chicago mob scene. Seven Blackhawks on the ice would have been too many. You dig?

Posted by inediblehulk on Wednesday, 06.15.11 @ 05:48am


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v247/brinkeguthrie/aor-3-cover-image.jpg

NOW IN STORES

CLASSIC ROCK MAGAZINE PRESENTS AOR: JULY 2011

CHICAGO: PETER CETERA BLASTS HIS EX-BANDMATES

We find out why Chicago sacked their talismanic frontman, Peter Cetera.

Classic Rock Presents AOR 3: Foreigner 4 | PRE-ORDER | Due for UK release 6th July 2011 | Free UK Delivery

A year to make. More than $1 million in recording costs. Deadlines missed. Budgets broken. Classic Rock Presents AOR analyses the dramatic birth of Foreigner 4.

The third sensational issue of AOR magazine celebrates a very special birthday: the 30th anniversary of the release of Foreigner 4 – the classic 1981 album that brought you such massive hits as Waiting For A Girl Like You, Urgent, Juke Box Hero and many more.

A sprawling 10-page feature, complete with a raft of exclusive interviews with the main players, tells you everything you need to know about the creation of this melodic rock masterpiece.

Plus there’s a fantastic free CD: Raised On Radio, featuring the very best of the latest melodic rock releases, including tracks by Def Leppard, Night Ranger, Alyson Avenue, Lionville, Airrace and 10 more.

Elsewhere in the issue, we find out why Chicago sacked their talismanic frontman, Peter Cetera.

We marvel at the the success of hitmaker supreme, Desmond Child.

We talk to Richard Marx, Black ’N Blue, Hardcore Superstar, Romeo’s Daughter and Eden’s Curse.

We look at the softer side of southern rock, when b