Boz Scaggs

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1990 (The 1991 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? Yes  what's this?

Boz Scaggs @ Wikipedia

Boz Scaggs Videos

Will Boz Scaggs be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

56 comments so far (post your own)

All these years later, background music for Hollywood movies, elevator music, waiting-noise on phone services AND the MAN 'BOZ SCAGGS' is still here! I wonder why?

Posted by Anthony Armstrong on Wednesday, 05.23.07 @ 22:18pm


You know who produced Boz Scaggs' first album?

Our good buddy.....the one and only (thankfully) the man we love (and some of us-hate)..............


JANN S. WENNER!!!

Posted by classicrocker on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 23:24pm


"Lido Shuffle" is cool. "Lowdown" absolutely sucks. "We're All Alone" is better by Frankie Valli.

So no, not really.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 08.15.09 @ 19:02pm


'Lowdown' kills 'Lido Shuffle'. Songs like 'Georgia', 'Miss Sun', and 'Someone Loan Me A Dime'...Boz deserves consideration.

Posted by Steve on Friday, 09.25.09 @ 20:54pm


Great songwriter, but stylistically obscure and...

He sings like a duck quacking. Not pleasant to listen to. Anyone with me on this?

Posted by -B on Wednesday, 12.9.09 @ 03:49am


"He sings like a duck quacking."

Posted by -B on Wednesday, 12.9.09 @ 03:49am

Fantasio Barrino fit's that description.


Posted by akeem on Wednesday, 12.9.09 @ 18:13pm


Yuo all a bunch of idiots. Boz was around in the San fran days with the Steve Miller band. One of the originals than drifted more into the R&B duck quacking youa re an idiot

Posted by Jay on Tuesday, 01.26.10 @ 17:44pm


BOZZ IS A LIVING LEGEND. PEOPLE WHO HAVE DONE MUCH LESS ARE IN THE HALL. HE IS A GREAT RnB PERFORMER AND SONGWRITER. THE ALBUM SILK DEGREES BY ITSELF IS ENOUGH - AND HE HAS DONE SO MUCH MORE

Posted by steve on Friday, 01.14.11 @ 21:25pm


As a writer Boz Scaggs penned some of the most memorable songs. His beautifully crafted music and lyrics put him in the company of many rock and roll songwriters of the past and present. As a recording artist he presented some of the most sleek and stylish albums that, like Steely Dan, penetrated the airwaves of FM rock. Later his studio session band made up of some of the most talented musicians would form TOTO and in my opinion is collectively as talented as say Springsteens E Street Band. Scaggs is in a league of his own. Silk Degrees is a perfect album, how many present R and R Hall of Famers can claim such distinguished credentials.

Posted by David on Tuesday, 07.26.11 @ 02:12am


THE BOZ SCAGGS/CHICAGO CONNECTION

1. Boz Scaggs and Chicago share three song titles:

LOWDOWN

Chicago-1971
Boz Scaggs-1976

LOVE ME TOMORROW

Boz Scaggs-1976
Chicago-1982

WHAT CAN I SAY

Boz Scaggs-1976
Chicago-1982

2. They both worked with producer David Foster

3. Bill Champlin did a few session with Boz

4. Both have used members of Toto on their albums and...

5. Jason Scheff co-wrote Boz's 1988 comeback hit "Heart of Mine"

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Saturday, 11.5.11 @ 17:05pm


Boz Scaggs' first official solo album, "Boz Scaggs" was produced by Jann Wenner. His second album, "Moments" was produced by recently appointed inductee Glyn Johns.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Friday, 12.9.11 @ 21:56pm


HALL OF FAMERS ASSOCIATED WITH BOZ SCAGGS

1. Duane "Skydog" Allman: Played lead guitar on the immortal classic "Loan Me A Dime"

2. Al Green: Boz recorded Green's "Old Time Lovin" on his album "My Time"

3. Glyn Johns: Produced Boz' second album "Moments"

4. Allen Toussaint: Boz covered four of Toussaint's songs:

"Freedom for the Stallion" and "Hello My Lover" (My Time, 1972)

"Hercules" (Slow Dancer, 1974) and...

"What Do You Want the Girl To Do" (Silk Degrees, 1976)

5. Jann S. Wenner: Founder of "Rolling Stone" and producer of the self-titled album released on Atlantic Records.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Saturday, 02.11.12 @ 02:30am


HALL OF FAMERS ASSOCIATED WITH BOZ SCAGGS

1. Duane "Skydog" Allman: Played lead guitar on the immortal classic "Loan Me A Dime"

2. David Brown: Founding member of Santana. Played bass on "Moments," "Boz Scaggs & Band" and "My Time." Wrote three songs for Boz. "Alone, Alone" (which he sang) and "We Been Away" from "Moments" and "Slowly In The West" from "My Time"

3. Al Green: Boz covered Green's "Old Time Lovin'" on his album "My Time"

4. The Eagles: Sang backing vocals on "Look What You've Done to Me."

5. Glyn Johns; Produced Boz' second album "Moments"

6. Jimmy Reed: Boz covered Reed's "Found Love" on his album "Come On Home"

7. Jimmie Rodgers: "Waiting For A Train" was included on Boz' self-titled debut album

8. Carlos Santana: Played lead guitar on "You Can Have Me Anytime" from "Middle Man (1980)"

9. Allen Toussaint: Boz covered four of Toussaint's songs:

"Freedom for The Stallion" and "Hello My Lover" on
"My Time" (1972)

"Hercules" (Slow Dancer, 1974) and...

"What Do You Want The Girl To Do" (Silk Degrees, 1976)

10. Jann S. Wenner: Founder of "Rolling Stone Magazine" and producer of Boz' self-titled debut album.

6. Jimmie Rodgers: Boz recorded "Waiting for a Train" on his self-titled debut album.

7. Carlos Santana: Played lead guitar on "You Can Have Me Anytime" from

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Saturday, 02.11.12 @ 06:56am


Frankly, I strongly dislike his voice and find his music unimaginative. I've been compelled to search his name, and brought to this site, as I thought that awful song played on the "swifter" commercials "Give me just a little more time" sounded like a Boz Scaggs song in both voice and melodic composition.

I realize I'm just an oddball and to each his own; he was very popular in the gosh awful period of music known as "the 70s".

Posted by noyb on Monday, 07.16.12 @ 10:03am


I realize I'm just an oddball and to each his own; he was very popular in the gosh awful period of music known as "the 70s".
__________________________________________________

>thinking an entire decade had nothing of worth.

Get out.

Posted by GFW on Monday, 07.16.12 @ 11:09am


I cannot endorse GFW's comment enough. "noyb" sounds exactly like a professor I had who only kept whining bad things about the 70's.

"noyb," if you have the audacity to write off an entire decade of music "gosh awful" well I guess you can have your opinion. Just don't share it with the rest of us who think your statement's a load of BS.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.16.12 @ 12:59pm


*"off an entire decade of music AS"

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 07.16.12 @ 12:59pm


Well, sorry, but if the page invites opinion, don't be aggravated someone has a different opinion than you do. No, there were some decent bands from the 70s, around the end such as the Sex Pistols, The Clash, Ramones, Elvis Costello, etc. which brought death to the monotonous, boring 70s. Sure, Iggy & the Stooges, Larry Raspberry & the Highsteppers ... nice bands. First three Springsteen albums ... nice stuff. Those were few and far between, though.

I mean really, what's the difference between styx, journey, foreigner, reo speed wagon, marshall tucker, jackson browne, james taylor, on and on and on ... same ole, same ole, boring yawn. Boz Scaggs and Steve Miller are in the middle of it, with Lynrd Skynrd, Molly Hatchett, Edgar & Johnny Winters ... my fingers are getting bored just listing these homogenous bands.

Posted by noyb on Monday, 07.16.12 @ 22:53pm


Nice way to gloss over Soul and Funk, noyb. :P

Posted by Antonio on Tuesday, 07.17.12 @ 00:17am


Actually apart from maybe Journey and Lynyrd Skynyrd I agree with you!

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 07.17.12 @ 14:11pm


In that case, I mostly agree with you, noyb. Thanks for going in depth ;)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 07.18.12 @ 02:53am


Out of all the acts you namedropped, noyb, the ones whom I would defend are Foreigner and Styx. REO Speedwagon and Journey are only good for a couple songs apiece, while Jackson Browne, James Taylor, and Marshall Tucker are the cream of the dogshit pile.

The best acts of the '70s, IMHO, are David Bowie*, Queen*, Roxy Music, The Sweet, Alice Cooper, The Doobie Brothers, Foreigner*, Donna Summer, The Bee Gees*, Jobriath, Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes, James Brown*, T. Rex, Pink Floyd*, The Spinners, Mickey Gilley*, Marvin Gaye*, Jerry Lee Lewis*, The Runaways, and Judas Priest*.

I would probably rank the 1970s as my second favorite decade of music, although it would be a tie with the 1980s (I love both decades too much to rank one below the other). Those who know my tastes on FRL will tell you what my favorite decade is, though (Hint: It's the one before the 1960s).

All the artists whom I've placed asterisks next to their names aren't necessarily just '70s acts, but their work in that decade was significant enough to justify ranking them among my favorite artists who recorded in the '70s.

Posted by Zach on Wednesday, 07.18.12 @ 15:13pm


You were so close! If you just would have switched around Foreigner and Styx with Jackson Browne and James Taylor you would have right. Darn...Thanks for playing!

Posted by Gassman on Wednesday, 07.18.12 @ 17:43pm


For a guy who wrongly accuses me of being a troll, you sure like to troll me a lot. I've counted three pages on which you've attempted to provoke fights with me: Minor Threat, Phil Ochs, and now here.

Perhaps if you'd read some of my other posts on this site, you'd realize I have a great deal of insight and knowledge of music. Take a look at the pages for Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, The Big Bopper, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Bill Haley, The Stray Cats, The Cars, Bill Ward and The Dominoes, The Coasters, Fats Domino, Asia, Pat Benatar, Cliff Richard and The Shadows, Yes, Chuck Berry, and Hank Williams pages. You'll see that I do contribute a lot of intelligent, informative comments here. If you don't want to accept that, then go on believing your false image of me.

Last time I checked, a troll is one who merely exists to get a rise out of other people. A troll is incapable of giving justification for their arguments and uses a lot of ad hominem attacks. None of those qualities apply to me.

Now if you want/need to know why Jackson Browne and James Taylor annoy me, here you go: Browne is another whiny, self-aggrandizing musician who uses his music as a soapbox to brainwash the public into buying his political propaganda (Not to mention he foolishly performs at rallies for the talking heads hand-picked by the Illuminati). Furthermore, his actual music is generic singer-songwriter pablum. His cover of Stay is overblown and lacks the heartfelt emotion of the original by Maurice Williams and The Zodiacs. Browne's draggy-ass vocals kill it for me. Somebody's Baby, a cheesy little ditty, almost ruined what is otherwise a very funny comedy movie (Fast Times at Ridgemont High). Need I go on?

As for James Taylor, he's the king of sissy music. The first time I heard Fire and Rain, I wanted to slap JT and tell him "Keep your drama to yourself, schmuck." Much like his compatriot Jackson Browne, Taylor decimated a classic '60s soul song, How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You). Then there's the all-time Golden Turkey Your Smiling Face. The flat, unemotive vocals are a major killjoy for this Motown fan. What's up with that godawful warbling at the end of the song? It sounds like JT's trying to combine yodeling and falsetto, but without doing either right. On top of all this, James Taylor's another puppet who performs for NWO-approved politicians (What's up with all the terrible musicians who perform at rallies for equally bad politicians, whether they're on the left or the right?).

That should clear up why I consigned Browne and Taylor to the dogshit pile.

Posted by Zach on Wednesday, 07.18.12 @ 21:20pm


I don't even care about Jackson Browne's politics, I just find him plain boring to listen to! Interestingly enough I actually used to own stuff by both Browne and James Taylor but sold it off. There's only so many times you can hear "Running On Empty" or "Fire and Rain" (using these two as examples since they're considered each respective artists signature songs) without going.. ugh!

If you're gonna go for singer-songwriters my recommendations are people like Cat Stevens, Jim Croce, Leonard Cohen or Donovan! (among others)

Since the argument started with Styx and Foreigner, I'll touch on those two as well. Styx, I don't care for ("Mr. Roboto" ... yecch!) but Foreigner actually has plenty of quality material which is often overlooked by high-brows who like to turn up their noses at people who listen to Foreigner as enjoying "corporate rock" (that label and "selling out" don't seem to be going the way of recordable tapes and compact discs, unfortunately).

Good discussion going on, though we've definitely gotten off the Boz Scaggs topic ;)

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 03:03am


Oh, come on, Tahvo, Leonard Cohen deserves better than that.

Posted by DarinRG on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 03:33am


Now that I have a few pints in me and my brain is finally working right, I think I misunderstood what you said, Tahvo. Disregard.

Posted by DarinRG on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 07:26am


Heh, yeah totally. I was SUPPORTING Leonard Cohen.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 09:35am


Please don't tell me you agree with that paranoid stupid Illuminati bullsh*t, Zach. I respected you!

Posted by GFW on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 09:37am


Don't worry, GFW. I used to be a total believer in all the illuminati/NWO theories, but have since discarded all of it. David Icke's batshit insane idea about how all the major political figures are reptilian shapeshifters was the final straw for me.

I honestly don't know why I even used the term "NWO-approved politicians." I was on a roll with my rant and got too caught up.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 18:32pm


Oh man, my local bookstore has a David Icke book. I remember seeing it while doing Work Experience and just laughing.

Posted by GFW on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 18:51pm


So let's see, Zach. We can't have people singing about politics or religion. Now we can't have human beings singing about relationships and how they feel because we risk being drenched in emotion. What's left to sing about that would meet your approval? The weather, perhaps? Yawn.

I kick myself for never telling James Brown when he was alive every time I heard him yelling "I Feel GOOOOD" to "Keep your drama to yourself, schmuck."

Posted by Arrow Man on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 20:25pm


As usual Arrow Man, you put words in my mouth and completely misconstrue what I was trying to say.

I have no problem with musicians using personal relationships or inner feelings as a basis for their songs. The problem lies in the presentation of those feelings and relationships.

One of my biggest turn-offs is singers with flat, unemotive voices. James Taylor puts no emotion or rhythm into his vocals. I used Fire and Rain as an example because it's one song that particularly grates on me because of Taylor's vocals, not the subject matter.

The "Keep the drama to yourself, schmuck" line was a reference to how the singer-songwriters of the early 1970s tended to indulge in writing weepy, overly sentimental lyrics. It was not intended as a flat-out dismissal of all musicians who use personal issues as inspiration for writing songs, just a select few.

When James Brown belts out, "I feel good," I feel a sense of joy. Then again, Brown trumps Taylor in just about every category and is a far more important musician.

I'm not big on lyrics because I find that analyzing them too deeply distracts from the enjoyment of the overall song. Besides, if lyrics were the only thing that mattered in music, we'd be left with spoken word recordings. I pay more attention to how the lead vocals sound and the instruments.

One exception is Chuck Berry's Downbound Train, which is full of deeply evocative lyrics. It's a great cautionary tale about the evils of alcoholism and has some of the darkest lyrics in a Berry song ("As the train rushed on at a terrible pace, Sulfuric fumes scorched their hands and face"). On top of that, you've got the rollicking background rhythm and deep, soulful vocals of Berry. Highly recommended song for Berry fans.

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 07.19.12 @ 21:55pm


Thanks for clearing that up. You have the right to dislike whatever you want anyway, don't misunderstand me. I just didn't see what else there would be that would qualify as very exciting lyrically.

The music is what I consider the most important part of a song. If I like the sound I can tolerate cheesy or sentimental lyrics. The sound of Fire And Rain always impressed me. The way the drums pound with an otherwise soft accompaniment results in an interesting musical contrast. I'm no big JT fan, but I always thought that song was really special. The words just fit the mood the music creates. Those are the best tunes, when words compliment music. That's what the 70s singer songwriters like Joni Mitchell did so well. If weepy words are what the songwriter is really feeling, then that's what the songwriter should be singing. Anything else would be bogus IMO.

Posted by Arrow Man on Friday, 07.20.12 @ 01:04am


test

Posted by test on Friday, 07.20.12 @ 01:09am


"I don't even care about Jackson Browne's politics, I just find him plain boring to listen to!"

It isn't so much Jackson Browne's political views that offend so much as it is that he incorporates them into his music. You already know how I regard musicians who use their music as bully pulpits for indoctrinating the public. This doesn't just apply to music; stand-up comedy, film, novels, and other media have been infiltrated by opportunists and rabble-rousers who are more interested in spreading their propagandistic views than they are in creating entertaining, good works of art.

I am a true escapist. After all, I was reared on The Three Stooges, Godzilla, and Universal Monsters as a child and I love all of that stuff as an adult. Call it naive or childish, but making it through life's realities is only possible because of life's fantasies. When I want to learn about global issues, I'll turn to the news or history books. Audiences these days have no imagination anymore. Everything has to contain some kind of heavy-handed political message or allegory. It's almost as if all those stuffy, pseudointellectuals who warned us about the so-called "evils" of rock 'n' roll, comic books, video games, etc., took over the arts and entertainment industries. How sad!

Now back to music:

Personally, the only artist to emerge from the whole singer-songwriter era who I can honestly say I like is Van Morrison. Morrison didn't just stick to the ho-hum, acoustic guitar strumming, sappy ballads. His material is far more versatile than the James Taylors and Carole Kings.

Using Morrison's 1970 album Moondance as an example, we can find gospel (Crazy Love), jazz (Moondance), blues (These Dreams of You), Celtic (Everyone), country (Brand New Day), and pop (Glad Tidings) all together, and that's only six of the ten songs of the album. He was a breath of fresh air in the late 1960s/early 1970s and one of the best things going on in music at that time.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 00:06am


So you really think every work of art containing a political theme is worthless? Frankly, that's just as pretentious as "all those stuffy, pseudointellectuals who warned us about the so-called 'evils' of rock 'n' roll" ever were.

It seems obvious (to me at least) that there is good escapist music and bad escapist music, as well as good political music and bad political music. Frankly, I think most people would agree that at least SOME acts were better in their more political periods than their more escapist ones. There are clearly some acts who write better political lyrics and struggle when they try to switch to escapism, and there are others who write better escapist lyrics and struggle when they attempt to cross over to politics. You can fill in the blanks. If I mentioned any specific bands, I know I'd piss you off, because you seem to have acts on either your "good list" or your "bad list" and you almost get to the point where anyone who likes any artist on your "bad list" (i.e. any band who has ever delved into politics at all) is not worth discussing music with. That's far too reductive for me to support. But here's one example in general: I think many heartland rockers/singer-songwriters were usually better in their political periods than their later adult contemporary periods when they wrote generic love songs.

I have nothing wrong with escapist acts at all, but how many long-running bands have been completely escapist all the time? Probably not all that many.

And there are certainly artists who are hypocrites who still make good political music in spite of their own hypocrisy. Preferring escapist music is fine. I probably do myself, but saying all music with political lyrics is bad and saying that certain acts are beyond reproach (even though some of the acts you like have probably delved into politics occasionally) is a bit too extreme and I daresay almost as extreme as the highly politicized acts you like to criticize.

Posted by Sean on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 01:53am


Zach, you are way too dogmatic on this point. I get irritated occasionally when musicians preach too much too (I've got a law degree, a masters and a B.A., so I don't need someone who barely finished high school telling me about the intricacies of global politics). But at the same time, there are simply too many great examples of music, film and literature that have a political message. To dismiss them just because they are somewhat political means you miss out on way too much great art.

You call it "indoctrination." I call it free speech. I am not so stupid as to change my beliefs just because Springsteen can sing convincingly about the trials of the working man. But I can still appreciate his talent, appreciate the spirit of the songs, and enjoy the muscality of it all. I can even listen carefully to lyrics and appreciate what he is trying to say, even though my own politics may not line up with his. So what? That is what is great about this country. Freedom of expression. And some of it might actually make me think about the issues in a different way, even if it doesn't change my mind all the way. That's great too.

Do you enjoy any sci-fi? A lot of sci-fi is metaphor or allegory for social or political issues. You'd have to almost ignore this entire genre if you fear the taint of the political in your art.

Posted by Dezmond on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 08:50am


Wait, how on earth is all of Carole kings music sappy ballads? Some of the stuff on Tapestry is pretty energetic. I mean, it's not exactly the Ramones or anything but still.

Also there's been loads of great political art, dismissing it all is silly.

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 08:52am


Jeeze, I feel like Frankenstein's monster when he was chased by the torch-wielding mob in the 1931 classic starring Boris Karloff.

Sean, I don't see how my viewpoint is pretentious seeing as how I'm not pretending to be something I'm not. The problem with politically-charged lyrics is that they alienate listeners like myself who just want to enjoy the music. There is enough stress and chaos in this world. I don't need to be reminded of it in a song, a movie, or a novel.

I'm not a musician and have no desire to be one, but when I listen to music, I listen to the instruments first. Whether's it's guitars, horns, drums, harmonicas, flutes, and what have you, it is the instrumentation that matters most to me in music. Without that, what would we be left with? Acapella and spoken word recordings? Sounds pretty dull to me!

I've never had any conversations with you before, but you seem to have checked up on my history here. What ever gave you the impression that I don't like to converse with other posters who like artists whom I loathe? My disagreements with GFW Tahvo Parvianen have not stopped me from being able to enjoy mature, thoughtful conversations on the music we mutually enjoy. It's the likes of Chalkie and Paul in KY whom I can't stand because they try to pigeonhole me as a "conservative" or "a monarchist/fascist." My dislike of Neil Young, Rage Against the Machine, Jackson Browne, Pete Seeger, and other left-wing artists does not automatically make me a member of the Faux News crowd. I hate their music in general. The naive lyrics are just a reinforcement for my dislike of these artists. I have also singled out right-wingers like Toby Keith, Ted Nugent and Hank Williams, Jr. (even though I enjoy some of the latter's music) for using their concerts and music as pulpits for their politics. There's no way in hell I'll ever see Hank Jr. in concert after his recent anti-Obama tirades. Concerts are not the place to go on one-sided, monotonous political rants. Thank God the original Hank Williams never stooped to that level.

The problem with politically-charged music is that it tends to sounds dated very quickly. Look at all the anti-GWB songs from the last decade. Everyone from Green Day to Pink to Neil Young jumped on the bandwagon because it was the "in" thing, but now that Dubya's no longer the Prez, all those songs mean nothing anymore. Hell, those songs are already largely forgotten because they're too tied in to a specific period of time. When you blatantly call out a political figure in your music, you can kiss your chances of having any transcendence or timelessness goodbye. And no, substituting someone else's name for GWB (or any other political figure) won't work, because times change and so do the circumstances. I don't exactly see such misfires as Let's Impeach the President and American Idiot joining the pantheon of timeless, transcendent songs any time soon.

Dezmond, I am not saying that artists like Bruce Springsteen can't have opinions. It's when they inject those opinions into their music and concerts that I get annoyed. I personally don't care for the Boss, mainly because of his vocals. His voice bothers me far more than his one-sided, annoying politics.

Musicians aren't being paid to drone about who we should vote for in upcoming elections. The music is what matters most. Play your instruments and sing. Leave the indoctrination to the talking heads on FOX, MSNBC, and other propaganda outlets controlled by the right and left. I pity the sheep who seriously look up to the likes of Ted Nugent or Pete Seeger for political opinions and ideas. Whatever happened to people thinking for themselves and not blindly toeing the line?

Themes like the trials of working class don't bother me so long as over references to political figures (more like ventriloquist dummies) and events aren't incorporated into the lyrics. I enjoy songs like Hell is For Children, Downbound Train (Chuck Berry's rendition), I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive, and Heroin, all of which deal with dark themes.

I do enjoy a lot of sci-fi. It's one of my favorite movie genres, next to horror, fantasy, action, and comedy (Sense a pattern here?). However, I find that a lot of these so-called political allegories are read into these movies after-the-fact and were not even intended by the directors. The original Invasion of the Body Snatchers is often read as an allegory for McCarthyism and/or Communism, but some of the personalities involved with this film have either denied these messages or said that they were never intended. Even Don Siegel, who directed the movie, stated in the book Don Siegel: American Cinema (1975):

I felt that this was a very important story. I think that the world is populated by pods and I wanted to show them. I think so many people have no feeling about cultural things, no feeling of pain, of sorrow. [] The political reference to Senator McCarthy and totalitarianism was inescapable but I tried not to emphasize it because I feel that motion pictures are primarily to entertain and I did not want to preach."

What one reads into a movie is entirely subjective. Merian C. Cooper, co-director and co-producer of the original King Kong, once said "Kong was never intended to be anything but the best damned adventure film ever made, which it is; and that's all it is." All the theories about King Kong being some kind of allegory for the struggle of blacks in the U.S. or the immigrant experience are just that, theories. There's no concrete evidence to support them. I'd rather take the testimony of those who actually made the movie.

Even if there are political metaphors present in these films, they are very latent. I sure as hell didn't get any socio-political vibes from watching Invasion of the Body Snatchers or King Kong.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 11:52am


You already know how I regard musicians who use their music as bully pulpits for indoctrinating the public. This doesn't just apply to music; stand-up comedy, film, novels, and other media have been infiltrated by opportunists and rabble-rousers who are more interested in spreading their propagandistic views than they are in creating entertaining, good works of art.

I am a true escapist. After all, I was reared on The Three Stooges, Godzilla, and Universal Monsters as a child and I love all of that stuff as an adult. Call it naive or childish, but making it through life's realities is only possible because of life's fantasies. When I want to learn about global issues, I'll turn to the news or history books. Audiences these days have no imagination anymore. Everything has to contain some kind of heavy-handed political message or allegory. It's almost as if all those stuffy, pseudointellectuals who warned us about the so-called "evils" of rock 'n' roll, comic books, video games, etc., took over the arts and entertainment industries. How sad!

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 00:06am
--------------------------------------------------
I understand somewhat where you are coming from. At the same time, don't forget that the Japanese had a definitive anti-nuclear message in Godzilla. In addition, most film critics have cited the quite interesting quasi-lesbian influece running through the 1936 film "Dracula's Daughter", which definitely falls under the 'classic horror" guideline.

Deep down inside, I believe your issue w/the 1960's isn't so much about politics, but rather the revisionist usage of politics to lend weight to songs in relation to music scenes that came afterwards. Here I can sympathize. It's real easy for some 1960's boomer to bury the music of the 70's, 80's, 90's, & 2000's by saying that some 60's track "spoke to people", & then drop a political reference to cover it up. There's a lot of "classic" rock that gets by using that stunt, & I'm not too much of a fan of it either. I don't discourage politics in everything, but rather I ask that the item in question hold itself up on artistic merit first. Anything added in is gravy, per se'.

I shouldn't have mentioned gravy - now I'm in the mood for mashed potatoes & gravy, w/maybe chicken & veggies. I'm outta here...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 11:52am


Zach - Our last comments came up at exactly the same time. Ignore the bits about Godzilla & Dracula's Daughter if you wish.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 11:58am


I understand somewhat where you are coming from. At the same time, don't forget that the Japanese had a definitive anti-nuclear message in Godzilla. In addition, most film critics have cited the quite interesting quasi-lesbian influece running through the 1936 film "Dracula's Daughter", which definitely falls under the 'classic horror" guideline.


Posted by Cheesecrop on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 11:52am

Absolutely, Cheesecrop. I'm not ignorant to the anti-nuclear themes present in the original Gojira. However, unlike a lot of recent films where the director is attempting to indoctrinate the audience into accepting his/her ideologies (Michael Moore is very guilty of this), Ishiro Honda wasn't blaming any one people or nation for nuclear weapons. You said it yourself, the film focuses on the effects of nuclear weapons in general. The scenes of mass destruction caused by Godzilla and human suffering speak louder than anything that some opportunist like Michael Moore or Oliver Stone could muster.

I haven't seen Dracula's Daughter in ages, so I'll have to check that one again.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 12:14pm


I think with Zach, it's that they seem to attempt 'indoctrination' from one particular point of view.

I suspect ole Zach wouldn't mind it so much if his point of view had more in the song creating cupboard than Wagner & Ted Nugent ;-)

Posted by Paul in KY on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 13:03pm


Methinks he doth protest too much.

Hee hee!

Posted by Paul in KY on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 13:06pm


Don't you ever get tired of being proven wrong, Paul?

I don't even like Ted Nugent's music, much less his overall views. As for Wagner, I am largely indifferent to classical. If you were trying to insinuate that I would be in favor of Wagner's anti-Semitic views, than you are an asshole of he first degree. I have never espoused any anti-Semitic ideologies.

Paul, you have a very sick habit of making baseless ASSumpions about me and my life. You don't even know me. You're a typical keyboard terrorist who takes advantage of the safety of his computer to malign my name and character. You wouldn't get away with this nonsense in the real world.

I never asked for your snide, baseless comments. Go do something productive with your life, like reading a book or going for a walk. Just get lost and don't ever respond to me again.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 14:08pm


Well I am sure we can all get along on agreeing that Boz Scaggs is talented person...

Posted by Happy on Sunday, 08.12.12 @ 16:29pm


Zach, "Let's Impeach the President" (Neil Young) won't stand the test of time because it's a crappy song that was thrown together in about 2 minutes (like the rest of that album)...not because of its political message. I agree, the song's got to be great first. Which is why Neil's "Ohio" is still a great song decades later. It rocks and has an urgent energy. It still packs a punch, even if it is dated in your estimation because he mentions "Nixon" in the lyrics.

Artists get "paid" (or, people buy their stuff) because that artist touches the audience in some way. Saying that an artist is not being paid to express his political opinions but to entertain doesn't make sense. An artist is "paid" to create art from whatever really moves that artist, and hopefully it will entertain. Sometimes, what moves an artist is politics or their view of what is happening in the world. Even "entertain" can have many meanings. Yes, it can be escapism, but I also find things in music, film or literature that make me think, not just let me escape for awhile. As opposed to escaping, great art might even connect you more to what is going on around you.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 08.13.12 @ 12:53pm


Now I will completely agree with you Zach on one point. When an artist from the stage starts to lecture (as in, give a speech vs. playing their music) in a live setting...few things piss me off more than that.

By the way, I'm also a big fan of classic horror.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 08.13.12 @ 12:55pm


Talented songwriter; talented musician; talented singer; still going strong 47 years after his first album: Yes, Boz Scaggs belongs in the hall!! From Loan Me A Dime to King Of El Paso, he has produced eclectic, amazing music. He delves into different styles seamlessly and always gives 100%. He is soul, R & B, rock, pop, country at any given time. His melodys are smart and stylish. Many people dismiss him as a soft balladeer...first they are badly informed. Second, his roots are in soul and blues. If Smokey Robinson sang the same songs they would be called classics. Now, I'm not dismissing anyone's opinion...we are all entitled to our own. My opinion is that Boz Scaggs not being in the Hall after 45 years of great craftsmanship is a damn shame!!

Posted by marmeduke on Tuesday, 08.14.12 @ 19:23pm


Zach, "Let's Impeach the President" (Neil Young) won't stand the test of time because it's a crappy song that was thrown together in about 2 minutes (like the rest of that album)...not because of its political message. I agree, the song's got to be great first. Which is why Neil's "Ohio" is still a great song decades later. It rocks and has an urgent energy. It still packs a punch, even if it is dated in your estimation because he mentions "Nixon" in the lyrics.

Artists get "paid" (or, people buy their stuff) because that artist touches the audience in some way. Saying that an artist is not being paid to express his political opinions but to entertain doesn't make sense. An artist is "paid" to create art from whatever really moves that artist, and hopefully it will entertain. Sometimes, what moves an artist is politics or their view of what is happening in the world. Even "entertain" can have many meanings. Yes, it can be escapism, but I also find things in music, film or literature that make me think, not just let me escape for awhile. As opposed to escaping, great art might even connect you more to what is going on around you.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 08.13.12 @ 12:53pm

Whatever "energy" Ohio contains is undone by Neil Young's characteristically draggy vocals and wailing guitars. Even when he does try to rock, Young still sounds as neutered as always.

And yes, the Nixon reference does date Ohio badly. Perhaps if you were alive when the Kent State shootings occurred, the song would probably resonate with you. I doubt the song has any actual resonance with younger generations, considering Nixon is long dead and the event which the song describes is more than 40 years old. The fact that classic cock (That's an intentional typo, by the way) stations play this hoary anachronism of a song doesn't bolster your case. It just means that classic rock radio has yet to emancipate itself from the late 60s/early 70s ghetto and dig deeper.

As for songs that resonate with generations, Ohio can't compare to something like My Girl or Rock Around the Clock. Those songs deal with timeless themes, namely romance and celebration, respectively. Ohio will forever remain an archaic artifact of a bygone generation. Yeah, Nixon was an asshole and the shootings at Kent State were an unfortunate occurrence, but why bother with a song when historians and eyewitness accounts tell a more complete story?

I'm not against discussing world events, but they have to be placed in their proper context. A three-minute song isn't going to solve a damn thing. Protest singers, regardless of their political affiliation, are mere demagogues. They should be dismissed as mere annoyances.

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 09.25.12 @ 14:06pm


I feel like I'm arguing with a fundamentalist regarding your rules against anything topical in your music. It just doesn't make much sense. I was not alive when Kent State happened, the song still resonates a great deal with me because I understand and appreciate our history. It is relevant because it is about our past.

When you say that "a three minute song isn't going to solve a damn thing," I don't think it was meant to. It was merely a reaction to what was happening. A visceral reaction, and one that is interesting, regardless of your politics. I teach history, so I don't go to music to learn history, but it can be a fantastic primary source document to reflect the times. (And, Nixon wasn't such the asshole as you may have been taught. It's a bit more complicated than Nixon being a simple villain.) I don't look to music to appreciate those nuances, most of these artists never even finished college. I don't expect them to teach me about history or politics. But I can appreciate their points of view and how they try to creatively express them.

I enjoy my music when it is a little more varied. I can only take so many songs about "romance or celebration" before it gets, well, boring. I appreciate more varied topics, including songs that reflect their times. Especially if the music (vs. just the lyrics) still move me, as "Ohio" does.

As for your critiques of Neil Young, those sound more like a difference in personal taste than anything else. I didn't hear any substantive criticism in there. Each to his own, though. Go ahead and listen to more "baby, I love you" / "you broke my heart" songs. There are only so many ways you can say that.

Posted by Dezmond on Tuesday, 09.25.12 @ 23:00pm


Gosh I don't know about all that is being said on the above Boz Scaggs thread but I sure enjoy his music

Posted by Happy on Tuesday, 09.25.12 @ 23:04pm


Love how you resort to making a complete ASSumption at the end of your post. Nah, I can't say I'm a fan of so-called "baby, I love you" / "you broke my heart" songs. Even the ones I do like, I like them for the musicianship, which is what matters most to me in music, not diatribes thinly disguised as songs. I very rarely listen to songs for lyrics, and when I do, it's for clever turns of phrase, humor, and poetic writing, not for the content.

Quite a few of my favorite acts haven't really dabbled much in "baby, I love you"/"you broke my heart" songs. I can't name any songs offhand by Gary Numan, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Pink Floyd, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Count Basie, or The Coasters (just to name a few of my eclectic favorites) that fit under either category. Even someone like Hank Williams, who wrote more than his share of these kinds of songs, poured a lot of emotion into his singing of these songs so that it would sound more natural.

If you want to keep listening to politically-charged songs, fine, that's your prerogative. I'm not trying to force anyone to accept my views as being the only valid ones. Kinda contradicts your half-witted notion that I sound like a fundamentalist, huh? I'm not even a religious person (Although I'm not an atheist either, I just don't really care either way), so how could that even remotely true?

If I were feeling particularly hateful right now, I'd go on a full-blown rant on why I despise Neil Young and his music. I'm not even going to bother with one because I'm tired of this conversation. It's time for me to get back to discussing good artists.

Boz Scaggs is okay. I haven't really had much exposure to his repertoire, aside from Lowdown and Lido Shuffle. I'll have to dig deeper and listen to a few albums before I make a complete judgement on Boz.

Posted by Zach on Wednesday, 09.26.12 @ 07:58am


I used to think of Boz as more of a "crooner", but after listening more closely, I find that, to me, he has fine R&B style. Some of his lyrics don't flow all that great, but overall an excellent artist. Silk Degrees alone should get him in....

Posted by Colleen on Friday, 06.21.13 @ 14:58pm


A class act,Sierra,Heart of mine,Just go, and many other great songs, my favourite singer by far,beats all others when he sings a ballad.

Posted by dave kent on Thursday, 09.4.14 @ 06:01am


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