Yes

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer

Category: Performer

Inducted in: 2017

Inducted by: Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson

Nominated in: 2014   2016   2017

First Eligible: 1995 Ceremony

Inducted Members: Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, Steve Howe, Trevor Rabin, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Alan White, Tony Kaye

Snubbed Members: Peter Banks


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 2001 (ranked #147) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Fragile (1971)
The Yes Album (1971)
Close To The Edge (1972)
Tales from Topographic Oceans (1973)
Relayer (1974)
90125 (1983)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Roundabout (1971)
I've Seen All Good People (1971)
Long Distance Runaround (1971)
Starship Trooper (1971)
Close to the Edge (1972)
Owner of a Lonely Heart (1983)
Leave It (1983)

Yes @ Wikipedia

Yes Videos

Comments

372 comments so far (post your own)

How can they have not even yet been nominated? Ridiculous. Now I must go vote for King Crimson.

Posted by Kailash on Saturday, 09.2.06 @ 21:52pm


For some reason Yes is being snubbed, it is something that happens and if it hasn't happened yet I'm sorry to say I don't think they will ever be inducted.

Posted by peter on Wednesday, 11.8.06 @ 06:35am


For Yes to not already be in the Hall of Fame points to some other factor. Arrogance, ignorance (let's be frank, stupidity) or denial of how influential and enormously successful Yes has been and how they still sell out a lot of arenas (over 35 years too). This isn't someone liking The Knack and LOverboy and wishing they got in. Yes has been dubbed a Supergroup time and time again. They have had #1 singles and a long list of songs that charted high in both rock and pop. They have sold millions of albums (tape, 8-track, cassette, cd's) and DVD's. They have made a movie or two. Even the artist who painted many of their album covers, Roger Dean has influenced millions. They have appealed to music majors at Berklee, dancers at the local disco, metal heads, philosophers and teenie boppers. The rock legends that have come out of Yes include: 5-time Best Overall Guitarist (Guitar Player magazine)-Steve Howe. Grammy-winning producer Trevor Horn, movie soundtrack mogul-Trevor Rabin, Pioneering keyboardist and rock bass legends Rick Wakeman and Chris Squire respectively. I actually have to stop because there are so many more superstars (Jon Anderson) and spawned supergroups (Asia) that I could go on forever.

Yes not in the Hall of Fame? That is quite literally and impossibly hard to ignore. One then must ask themselves: Why would Yes even want to be in a place so wrong and ignorant of such a juggernaut in the world of rock and popular music?

It must be a selfish sham.

Posted by The Truth on Tuesday, 11.14.06 @ 12:11pm


Yes has been in the top 5 of this poll:
http://www.rateitall.com/t-2529-deserving-of-the-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame.aspx
for over 2 years. After Van Halen gets in, then Yes will be near the top of the list of overlooked but most deserving bands.

Posted by Garrett on Wednesday, 11.29.06 @ 16:14pm


I've almost given up hope that Yes will be inducted. When it Finally does happen, it will almost feel like a token gesture.

All the musicians in and out of Yes are masters at what they do.

It seems virtuosity doesn't count for anything, but bad attitudes and four-letter words do.

Posted by Steve on Saturday, 12.30.06 @ 21:57pm


The RRHOF is a joke. Looking at future nominees it appears it is all about getting paying customers in the door. The influence of Yes is enormous and deserving. Now they have inducted Grand Master Flash.. Rock and Roll, I think not!

They will never get my money.

Posted by Charles on Monday, 01.8.07 @ 18:33pm


I don't think there can be any denying that the RRHOF comittee has an obvious bias against progressive rock. The only real prog band to make it is, predictably, Pink Floyd. I have no argument there but to ignore the impact that YES, Genesis, ELP, Crimson, Rush and others had on rock for the entire decade of the 1970s and beyond is ridiculous.

I think Yes and Genesis are the obvious choices based on the extent and quality of their work, the level of musicianship and their impact on the way albums and concerts are presented. Without these artists there would be no Radiohead or Tool, which I would suggest are the two greatest bands recording today. And to say that Howe, Squire and Wakeman haven't had a profound impact on how the guitar, bass and keyboards are played today in rock and roll would be a ridiculous lie.

The natural retort to those who don't get prog is that the music is "self-indulgent". This is a lazy and trite excuse for critical examination. Progressive rock, led by the aforementioned inovators, purposely and enthusiastically pushed the boundaries of rock to spaces and places it had never been before. Granted, they may have over-reached at times but without them we would still be hearing the same 3 major-chord progressions, wrapped around verse, chorus, verse, chorus, guitar solo, chorus.

Posted by SRM on Tuesday, 01.23.07 @ 14:50pm


The geatest most distinctive classic rock growl in history has been shamefully overlooked. The legendary JOE COCKER has a resume that far out paces many inductees. he has been making hit music for over 4 decades and still can outsing most performers half his age. Today justin timberlake is considered soulful to the young generation, but Joe cocker makes him sound like a "girlie man". Vocally Joe would blow him and most of his contempoaries off the stage. It is amazing how the RRHOF induction committee has forgotten about Joe who can't even get a nomination. His performance at Woodstock and his famous Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour are legendary rock events. At 62 years old he can still bring an audience to a frenzy as seen in his most recent tours. One of the few classic rockers who still has what it takes.

Posted by Tony on Saturday, 02.17.07 @ 09:06am


Like all the posts before me, I also find it incredulous that a supergroup like YES has been overlooked. Each member of YES can stand on their own merit. Not many other groups can boast that. And their influence on todays music and musicians, well, that list is almost endless. An egregious mistake has been made by the RRHOF.

Posted by Radioactive on Tuesday, 03.13.07 @ 07:29am


I HAVE PURCHESED EVERY YES ALBUM AND CD AND DVD PRODUCED IN AND ABOUT THIS BAND AND ALL THEIR SOLO ENDEVORS,AS A MUSICAN IM ABSOLUTLEY APPALLED THAT THESE ARTISTS WHO HAVE HAD MAJOR INFLUENCE IN MUSIC ALL OVER THIS PLANET SUCH ORIGINAL MASS APPEAL. SAME THING FOR EMERSON,LAKE AND PALMER .DONT LET THESE INOVATORS HANG IN THE WIND LET US RAISE THEM UP. IM SURE THEY DESERVE THIS JUST REWARD.THEY HAVE EARNED IT,...THANK YOU ALL MEMBERS OF YES PAST TO PRESENT .YOUR MUSIC INSPIRES ME ALL OF MY DAYS...THANK YOU

Posted by don pruitt on Friday, 03.16.07 @ 13:54pm


Yes and King Crimson are the two prog rock acts if any that should get in in my opinion.

Posted by jim on Thursday, 03.22.07 @ 18:24pm


You forgot the premier "progressive" rock band -RUSH

Posted by Anonymous on Monday, 03.26.07 @ 19:01pm


Here are the Billboard album chart numbers from
1972-1994 for YES.
1972 Fragile 4
1972 Close to the Edge 3
1973 Yessongs 12
1973 Tales of Topographic Oceans 6
1974 Relayer 5
1977 Going for the One 8
1978 Tormato 10
1980 Drama 18
1983 90125 5
1987 Big Generator 15
1991 Union 15
1994 Talk 33
Those numbers are not good enough for the Rock-n-Roll hall of Fame.
Do you know how many Top 15 Albums "Grandmaster Flash","The Ramones" and "Patti Smith" have combined in the same time span?

Posted by anthony rubbo on Friday, 04.6.07 @ 18:24pm


Do you know how many more bands cite those bands as influences compared to Yes?

I've said it before and I'll say it 'till I'm blue in the face: record sales and album charts do not count for jack when it comes to real, definite influence.

Posted by William on Friday, 04.6.07 @ 23:11pm


"YES" --Have influenced many --and they have a sound that is distinctive to them.

--There is a underground progressive movement of many bands(YES influenced) and thanks to the internet fans can find them. Mass media and radio has dictated what you listen to in four minutes or less. Yes has had tons of influence. Not anyone can take on Yes music without having a great degree of skill and attention span for up more than three minutes.
I can get a group of thugs to learn the Ramones catalog of songs. And what does Grandmaster Flash do? Play a turntable?

I added the IMPRESSIVE Album chart numbers of Yes because I guess it means someone liked them.
There are artists out there that score on a couple of single hits over a span of four years and are exaulted.
1972 to 1991 YES attained chart numbers like that and did not influence anybody? There is no other genre of music that suffers the prejudice that progressive rock does.

Posted by anthony rubbo on Saturday, 04.7.07 @ 14:51pm


This is probably the tenth time I've been accused of being a radio junkie by some random idiot.

That would be why I've advocated King Crimson and the Melvins, huh?

The irony of talking about a "bias" toward progressive rock while mocking the achievements of the Ramones and Grandmaster Flash might be lost on you, but I'm relishing it.

Posted by William on Saturday, 04.7.07 @ 18:19pm


I'm not a random idiot you snob.
Don't worry no one is threatening your musical knowledge. Its safe and sound.
How nice of "YOU" to advocate King Crimson

When I stated that the mass media and radio dictate what YOU listen to. I meant it in general terms. Not toward you specifically.
What makes the Album chart sales relevant in the case of YES is that they are not a singles band.
They tour with or without an album release.

Do NOT underestimate the influence of YES.
Thats All.
Did you advocate ELP?
- The Ramones and Grandmaster Flash should have been honored AFTER --YES and ELP. The whole prog rock era was ignored.

Posted by ANTHONY RUBBO on Saturday, 04.7.07 @ 21:12pm


I don't hold a hefty stake in the Hall, but I don't think I'm underestimating Yes. Certainly I have a few I'd rather see before them, but I'd take them over, say, Rush.

But influence-wise, the Ramones and Grandmaster Flash nearly dominate their respective genres,whereas with something like prog, there are quite a few competing for the top spot.

Posted by William on Saturday, 04.7.07 @ 21:34pm


OK ,I do agree.
As stated.

Posted by anthony rubbo on Sunday, 04.8.07 @ 20:35pm


"Do you know how many more bands cite those bands as influences compared to Yes?"

You are an absolute idiot...Yes, no influence? Grandmaster Flash has had no influence in Rock...mb in Rap, but not rock. This is the RRHOF, is it not?

To say that Yes has had little influece is plain dumb. As for Rush, they are one of the greatest rock bands of all time, hnads down...plus they have the numbers to back it up....if you think being able to sell your music via albums and concert songs means nothing, that is plain dumb too...get out these blogs!

Posted by ANON on Tuesday, 04.10.07 @ 05:54am


William wouldn't know good music if it bit him in the ass.......

Posted by Anonymous on Monday, 04.16.07 @ 20:00pm


Go back to 4chan.

Posted by William on Monday, 04.16.07 @ 20:36pm


Yes won't get in anytime soon... because too many on the voting committee play favorites, having fixed ideas as to what true rock / rock and roll should be. - Yes struck out on a very individual path, and aspired to *art*; roundabout 1975 that began to be viewed as anathema to the 'true spirit of rock and roll', (most cliches are so for a reason) . On their own terms the band were very much rebels, ...but that had nearly everything to do with the *music*. While, of the image they portrayed, what had it to do with the proscribed and favored forms of 'the genuine article', or of genuine rock rebellion? (James Dean grooving on Yes music? Both he and the viewer alike would probably end up wincing.)

True, their music wasn't much about some youthful striking out against society, not overtly or implicitly backing any sort of minority or cause. Nor in their rebellion was the individual the main point, he/she was never the center of attention. (An important point I think.) - But maybe the main problem for Yes, as regards their HOF status, is that their music rebelled against the wrong thing; their rebellion was against the limited and prepossessing structures of rock and roll itself! - (Plus there's the whole matter of Yes' lyrical content... in all the documentaries I've seen, produced since the late 1980's, the spiritual aspect of '60's-'70's counter-culture is treated as a sideshow at best, if not ignored or outright ridiculed....) Initiated to the themes and concerns common to rock music, or soul, or punk music, disco, do-wop or any other style the Hall has seen fit to give honor, Yes is... well, an outsider. And that is how it stands.

The matter of their inclusion or not ultimately has to do with fashion, with changing styles, what's in and what's out. But from this perspective sez I, the band for years made great music, and did with a style and message all their own, years before the R n'R Hall of Fame was even a twinkle in I. M. Pei's eye.

Posted by Mark Sink #38 on Monday, 04.30.07 @ 23:41pm


"As for Rush, they are one of the greatest rock bands of all time, (blah-blah-blah...)"

(Ahem)- please take of the tin foil cone hat and stop channeling Rush every fucking chance you get - please?? Who brought up Rush?

Yes seems like too big of an icon and too much of a progressive patriarch to ignore much longer, in my pop layman opinion. I'd agree that The Ramones and Grandmaster Flash were more widely influential, but c'mon already - Yes seems obvious to me.

Posted by shawn on Tuesday, 05.8.07 @ 22:43pm


I'd take Yes over Ramones or Grandmaster Flash any day. The Rockhall's No Prog Rock Rule is getting more and more ridiculous with each passing year.

Posted by Dezmond on Wednesday, 05.9.07 @ 08:38am


I can't understand why Yes isn't in yet...

Posted by John - CT on Saturday, 06.2.07 @ 23:01pm


It's pretty clear why they aren't in: The people running the show HATE progressive rock. Even Pink Floyd would have been kept out if DSOM and The Wall hadn't become cultural icons.

Now everyone's entitled to their opinions, but these self-imposed representatives of the Rock and Roll community really need to start looking past their personal biases.

Posted by Tom W on Thursday, 06.7.07 @ 14:15pm


William said on 04.7.07 - "But influence-wise, the Ramones and Grandmaster Flash nearly dominate their respective genres,whereas with something like prog, there are quite a few competing for the top spot.

As far as influence, the Johnny (?) Romone quote I best remember, it's on video I recall, is the one where he says The Romones thought they were creating bubble gum music, but then someone told them it was punk. ...Half a dozen of one... half a week's worth of The Sundays, maybe... it's still (*just*) Rock 'n Roll to me. --- Maybe The Romones where another Sha Na Na revival... but stuck somewhere in the early-to-mid '60's?

Posted by Mark Sink #38 9 on Sunday, 06.24.07 @ 14:53pm


Grandmaster Flash gets in over Yes, what a joke....

Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, 06.24.07 @ 15:33pm


Grandmaster Flash gets in over Yes, what a joke....

Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, 06.24.07 @ 15:33pm


WOW THEY WEREN'T EVEN NOMINATED ITS REDICULES THAT BANDS SUCH AS

KANSAS, LOVE, HEART, RUSH, JUDAS PRIEST, BOSTON, B-52'S, YES, THE GUESS WHO, LOVIN SPPONFUL, STEPPENWOLF, GENESIS, OZZY OSBOURN, TEARS FOR FEARS, THE "5" ROYALES, BLOOD, SWEAT, AND TEARS, The Zombies, The Turtles, The Monkees, X, AND KISS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The Crickets aren't even in this web site!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by jOHN on Tuesday, 06.26.07 @ 18:56pm


You sure know how to list your old record collection, just like many baby boomers here...by the way, The Lovin' Spoonful ARE in the Hall.

Posted by Casper on Tuesday, 06.26.07 @ 20:26pm


Yes is not in the R&R Hall of Fame. Unbelievable.

Posted by Vexableman on Friday, 09.28.07 @ 12:23pm


Yes is not in because they do not think that Progressive Rock is Rock. Yet the highly talented Patty Smith get in. I live in Cleveland & I have never been there & will not go there, especially after the newest inductees were introduced, Madonna???? WTF. Call it the PoP music hall of fame, cause it ain't RnR

Posted by Marc on Monday, 10.1.07 @ 13:28pm


Yes should definately be in. They are the best ROCK band in the history. They are so good they coulkdn't just call it rock anymore, they had to find a new 'tag'. Prog rock has allways been neglected by so called experts. And Yes is the most important prog rock band.
They have sold lots of records, but more importantly, they have sold out arenas all over the world for 35-40 years now. They are BIG. (Didn't they sell oout MSG 7 days in a row back in the 70s). They are the musicians musicians.

Posted by Roger Hennie on Monday, 10.29.07 @ 04:23am


I suspect that Britney Spears will be inducted before Yes.
Long live stupidity!!

Posted by Roger Hennie on Monday, 10.29.07 @ 04:26am


This is reverse snobbery -- the fact that a band thought their music deserved more than throwing TV sets out of hotel rooms into swimming pools, nightly orgies with teeny boppers or injecting dope in their veins makes them seem "on the fringe" as serious rockers. It's not going to be too long until youth re-discover YES as they have the Beatles... What will the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame think then? You can't keep Yes down. I've some of the members of Yes, they are the hardest working band ever.

Posted by Susan Sheppard on Sunday, 12.9.07 @ 17:26pm


It has become so obvious that those who are behind the nominations and voting of the HoF have a serious bias against prog rock. Yes, Pink Floyd is in. That is their concession. But what they seem to ignore is the popularity, the influence, the raw talent that bands such as Yes and ELP and Rush and Kings Crimson and perhaps the most talented of all, Gentle Giant, have shown over the years. For these artists to not be considered, let alone inducted, in the face of some of the over produced pop artists who already have plaques in the HoF, just goes to show that this place is not about the music but about what a small group of biased individuals believe.

Posted by Mark R. Turner on Thursday, 12.13.07 @ 19:52pm


I think it's time for people to stop being upset about talented groups like "YES" not being inducted into the HOF. Most people who grew up listening to rock know that they and other well-known groups should be shoe-ins for induction.
What people should be upset about is how the Hall of Fame has lost its way from its original intentions of who can be eligible. The HOF used to represent integrity for their earlier selections of inductees. These earlier members were truly influenced by one genre, ROCK & ROLL, which is what The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame was originally all about...celebrating the bands and musicians who, influenced by the pioneers of Rock, created great enough songs to be honored in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.
So, again, don't be sad for YES, King Crimson, or the many other bands that deserve to be recognized as great artists. They don't need to be associated with this organization. Be sad that this once credible establishment has turned into just another corporate money maker driven by greed to get as many people in their doors as possible by inducting artists like Madonna, and the Hip Hop groups who have virtually no connection to Rock & Roll.

Long live Rock & Roll. Sadly, short lived the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by Gary_John on Friday, 12.14.07 @ 07:50am


I can't really add any more to the example already given as to why YES should be in the Music Critics Hall of Fame. I'm just one more fan the band raising my hand to vote for them as the most deserving bands in the world. I'm sure some day they will be inducted. Funny, bands like The Sex Pistols and The Ramones are in and when the music critic's darling,"Punk" emerged in the 70s, YES was one the bands sited as a reason for the doors needing to be kicked in. Those bands are gone and YES is still around. And when the are inducted, it will put a fine point on what is so glaringly obvious to Rock music fans.

Posted by Greg Bumgardner on Sunday, 02.10.08 @ 13:30pm


Yes Should be not only in the hall of fame as a group but individually also. How could a group as talented and popular as them not be in ON THE FIRST BALLOT!!! Lets stop with the grand master flash stuff and put in one of the greatest and most influential bands of all time in!!!

Posted by jeff Kenyon on Tuesday, 02.19.08 @ 11:12am


I remember learning to play guitar in the early 80's. Playing songs by Kiss, the Who, and some other blues influenced stuff...then a friend (a far better player than I) showed me Yes...the sonud blew me away. I had to make that sound! But it was far too complicated for my untrained musicality to handle. It forced me to get better. It forced me to learn how to actually play my instrument. I sought out music theory and knowledge. I had to learn many styles of music to understand what was going on in Yes' music.

I play music in the US Army now, and it was all that searching and seeking and striving to play that helped me earn that honor.

I am but one musician inspired and challenged by the music of Yes. I know there is uncountable numbers of others out there. This band deserves the recognition that has been bestowed upon so many others of considerably inferior musicianship.

Posted by Frank Esquer on Wednesday, 04.9.08 @ 20:32pm


i have thought about a trip to the r&r hall of shame---but now not untill yes is in there. they lose my money & time till then.

Posted by hotrod bill on Thursday, 06.5.08 @ 10:47am


Face it folks... there are reasons that bands such as Genesis, ELP, Jethro Tull, Procol Harum, King Crimson, Yes, the Strawbs, Gentle Giant, Alan Parsons (he produced/engineered a little thing called "Dark Side of the Moon," too, remember?) and many others are NOT in the Hall--they are not seen as the "voice of the common man," according to Jann Wenner and his compatriots. Somehow if Rock meshes with the blues, or folk, or jazz it's OK... but mix classical with rock and somehow that is illegitimate. Hence, prog rock is kept out by those who have contempt for the genre because of its classical roots (hence the overused description that it's "overblown, indulgent," etc.). Yes has sold the albums, made the impact, re-invented itself and has excelled in the multi-media universe- even today, 35+ years after their birth... all the while releasing albums and continuing to tour. It is systemic bias. But, perhaps after one truly prog rock band gets in, maybe we will see the likes of others admitted. That is my hope.

Posted by Music Lab on E-Music on Saturday, 07.5.08 @ 14:05pm


Don't know if they should be in or not. They're right on the bubble, IMO. Loved those Roger Dean album covers, though.

Posted by Paul in KY on Thursday, 07.10.08 @ 13:02pm


This is all about Jann Wenner and Rolling Stones' persecution of "progressive rock" since day one. Yes, ELP, Genesis, and King Crimson are but the most noticeable exclusions. Rolling Stone has been bashing prog rock bands since they first broke new ground in the early seventies. They were unique and brought a whole new sound to the table. These bands were once referred to as "classical rock" at the time because no one had heard their like before and as such defied classification. You know how every kid in America has those little Casio keyboards in their basements? Well back in the day, the Moog synthesizer was new, bulky, and expensive. And only a handful of bands were visionary enough to include these new sounds into the musical mainstream. This is what's known as "influence". But ultimately this isn't about influence, record sales ( although my personal favorite Yes has sold roughly 35 million records worldwide), and creativity. This is about Wenner and his magazine's relentless dislike of music they simply can't understand. Make no doubt about it: this is Rolling Stone's Hall of Fame. Through the years we've seen one act wonders make the cover of RS, as well as manufactured pop tarts and puff pieces on fluff acts that read as if they came from a record company's PR department. And ultimately it's not so much as the folks that haven't gotten in, so much as it is the dizzying array of indefensible acts who shouldn't as much be allowed in the city of Cleveland, not to mention one of it's best known attractions.
Soon Genesis will be in, but not because of it's Gabriel/Steve Hackett days, but because of they pop phenom they morphed into as Phil Collins' backup band. Hey Jann...step down. A lot of us are sick of your exclusion of some of the most truly deserving acts just because you've been out of the loop. Bands comprised of actual musicians should not be excluded simply based on your lack of repect. Step aside Jann; your time in the sun is over.
Or as Peter Gabriel put it all those years ago "If you think that it's pretentious/you've been taken for a ride".



Posted by Walston on Friday, 08.8.08 @ 11:18am


Great post Walston

By the way I realized prog rock band Strawbs don't have a page on this site we need to get one up and running

Posted by Keebord on Thursday, 08.28.08 @ 13:06pm


Aside from the ones truly deserving, starting with Elvis and the Beatles, this is one institution in which I, for one, would want little or no part of. It's almost an embarrassment to be inducted, especially if you look to the likes of both the Ronettes and Phil Spector being included. This abomidable list goes on and on.

The Yes musicians can rest easily in the fact that they are amongst the virtuosos of rock, consistently and fluently partaking in highly advanced melodies, progressions, key changes, transitions and lyrics. If this is "self indulgence" to those at the Hall, then you can have the Hall. For me, it's incredible music for the ages. Long live Anderson, Squire, Howe and the rest! Down with Jenn Wenner and his highly biased cronies who see rock and roll as little more than boundless anger backed with a beat.

Who needs the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

Posted by Gig on Sunday, 09.7.08 @ 11:21am


This band stand as the absolute definitions of "self-indulgence" and "instrumental wankery."

No way are they at the front of the prog queue, but they're certainly ahead of the deeply mediocre Genesis.

Posted by Liam on Sunday, 09.7.08 @ 11:47am


I had signed a petition this year to get them inducted and even sent the HoF a letter listing 5 acts that should be considered. I'm not taking any shots at Genesis or Rush, because I included both of them as future considerations. While I still hope for their worthy induction, I do know this- they're in MY Rock and Roll Hall of Fame!

Posted by Bill Langan on Friday, 09.12.08 @ 19:59pm


I am tired of labels. All the bands mentioned in this thread (Yes, Rush, ELP, King Crimson, Kansas, etc...) that have been ignored, probably don't give a flip about being in the Hall of Fame. That is what makes them great. They do it because it is in them to do it. They create because it gives them joy to do so. It is the air they breathe. Lucky for us, it is the air we breathe also. I would rather buy a Rush tee-shirt than a ticket to the Hall of Fame. I would rather listen to a Porcupine Tree cd than travel to that building.
As the commercial goes...
Rush tee shirt...$40.00
Porcupine Tree cd...$16.00
non-commercial music...priceless
Keep on going Hall of Fame, I hope you live on for 100 years, and that prog rock dances on your grave after you die out!

Posted by Robert on Monday, 09.22.08 @ 21:43pm


saw gary moore and i saw power.saw stevie ray and i saw love and soul shining through.saw steve howe and i saw genius! he does solo acoustic outings in nashville once in awhile, there music is so technical leaps and bounds above the masses most cant phathom until they witness the bond between steve howe and his hundred or so guitars.squire on bass anderson ,oh im not here to educate turns out i'm here to laugh and the unknowing .as for this rap and disco garbage i have a multidigit IQ so i cant relate.dance as if no ones watching- sing if no ones listening, but for gods sake dont waste this philosophy on rap.

Posted by segovia on Monday, 09.22.08 @ 22:47pm


Two words keep Yes and all the others out - "Jann Wenner". This pompous, self-important creator of "Rolling Stone" magazine thinks only his opinion counts. It's his HOF, not the peoples', so our opinion does not matter. As far as I'm concerned, The R&RHOF is a private endeavor, and does not reflect the true state of our passion for our favorites. It's all about Jann. To hell with him. Yes are in "MY" HOF, and will be forever.

Posted by Steve on Tuesday, 09.23.08 @ 13:53pm


simply beyond comprehension that Yes is not there.

Posted by TimO on Tuesday, 09.23.08 @ 15:04pm


Kailash and Peter,

it is not accurate to say Yes are being snubbed.

It is clear that the Nominating Committee has discussed them, but many people within it find them unpalatable.

The idea that King Crimson have been snubbed, however, is quite possible. The fact that King Crimson have never been discussed by the Committee shows a possibility of deliberate exclusion at that level for personal or other reasons.

Posted by taite on Wednesday, 10.8.08 @ 22:03pm


The absence of Yes is irrefutable proof that the Hall hates prog.

Posted by Randy on Sunday, 11.2.08 @ 17:26pm


This is a pissing match with Jann Wenner. Yes has always been a problem for the mainstream elite. They are without a doubt one of the most influential bands in rock history. Without them, the prog rock genre may not have germinated. Bands like Rush, Dream Theater, etc. were very heavily influenced by them. The fact they didn't sell as many units as GrandMaster Flash has nothing to do with it. This snub negates any credibility with the RHOF in my book.

Posted by Zibby on Monday, 11.10.08 @ 10:33am


You can't say "No" to "Yes"

Posted by Semaj Dnob on Saturday, 11.22.08 @ 15:05pm


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHAAAAA

Posted by king floyd on Saturday, 11.22.08 @ 20:32pm


YES should have made it many, many years ago, along with Deep Purple, ELP and the Moody Blues.

Posted by Dick on Wednesday, 01.14.09 @ 10:47am


was just at the Hall of fame today........that Yes, Deep Purple, & KISS to name but 3 are not in the hall is the biggest travesty.
And don't get me started on ELO, E.L.P and even ABBA (possibly the biggest selling act of the 70's)

Posted by dubois on Saturday, 02.7.09 @ 22:24pm


A lot of good comments here that I agree with. What about a law suit by yes, elp , etc. By being biased they are liable for damages. Other half of fames look at facts etc and have consistant rules for inclusion. Does anyone know if non-inclusion restricts advertizers etc not to carry their cd's t-shirts, etc?

Posted by bruce on Friday, 03.6.09 @ 11:22am


I once heard that Rolling Stone had some kind words for "Close to the Edge" when it came out, but has bashed the album since then. Can anyone confirm this and point me to a source?

Posted by Cory Cosens on Thursday, 03.12.09 @ 12:12pm


Yes has always been in a league of their own. Something has kept them out all these years - it's anybody's guess who/what/why. Perhaps the foundation are confused about "which Yes" to induct. There have been MANY personnel changes in the band. The "Fragile/Close To The Edge" Yes is an entirely different band from the "Owner Of A Lonely Heart/Trevor Rabin/90125" Yes. However, when they inducted George Clinton/Parliament/Funkadelic there were many, many people onstage all receiving HOF trophies. Yes have been so influential I think they should simply induct all members. Here's another snag: both Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes would go in as members of Yes (under the previous logic of inducting all members), yet they arguably deserve to be recognized as The Buggles for being the inaugural music video band with Video Killed The Radio Star. Additionally, Horn deserves recognition from the Hall as an innovative producer. It's a weird situation. Lastly, when Ahmet Ertegun was living, he must have done something to keep Yes from being nominated. He was one their biggest champion, both during the 70's and then in the 80's when they made their celebrated comeback. At some point during the years it took them to follow up with "Big Generator" Mr. Ertegun became fed up with them to the point of writing them off forever. It was at this point I think they may have ruined their chances. Under the current hierarchy headed by Mr. Wenner, I don't see them having much of a chance either. Rolling Stone was never that enamored with Yes - remember they were the 1st mainstream rock publication to label them "boring old farts" when punk/new wave began to take over our consciousness in the late 70's/early 80's. It's a shame the politics are standing in their way, because they UNDOUBTEDLY deserve to be inductees for their innovations and massive influence, not to mention many, many years of excellent music.

Posted by Vince on Sunday, 03.15.09 @ 21:23pm


It's absurd that Yes is not in the Hall. The early band's influence is still apparent in theme-like albums by contemporary acts like The Decemerists. Their omission undermines the credibility of the Hall - period.

Posted by Jon on Sunday, 03.29.09 @ 08:06am


This may sound obvious, but I don't see many musically complex bands in the RHOF. I think YES is just too sophisticated musically to fit in with all of the pop-icons in the RHOF.

The powers-to-be of the RHOF are very biased towards basic pop and basic rock n roll. Music that is deeply textured and has all the roller coaster/cosmic space woven into the melodies isn't what these dummies voting for RHOF inductees want.

YES like their cousins, King Crimson and Genesis wrote full-length novels of music while most of their rock n roll relatives were writing sentences and making a song out of one or two musical phrases.

The RHOF just wants their meat please. No thank you to drinks, hor' deurs, after dinner drinks and desserts. No fine dining at the RHOF, its the Burger King of the music business.

Posted by Ed on Wednesday, 06.10.09 @ 18:07pm


Your right Ed, progressive rock in itself is too sophiscated for people like Jann Wenner to understand.

Posted by Keebord on Wednesday, 06.10.09 @ 18:13pm


That's because people like Jann Wenner and others are a bunch of ignorant in-bred hicks

Apologies for the crude comment but sometimes that's the best way to get your point across

Posted by Mongoose on Wednesday, 06.10.09 @ 18:15pm


It's not a matter of a group or artist being "too this" or "too that". It's a matter of a select few forcing their will (and personal opinion) on the rest of us. It shouldn't be about Rolling Stone magazine (which, by the way, lost all credibility with me by putting that "mutt" American Idol runnerup on the cover) & "friends"...there just seems like there's a better way of voting with more qualified participants.

Also, any group or artists who claim it's not important to them are LYING (that includes the Sex Pistols...if they really didn't care, they just simply wouldn't have shown up and not made any statements). I do think though that after years of frustration, some just shrug it off.

That's one person's opinion, anyway...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 06.10.09 @ 18:31pm


Cheers to Gitarzan for a sensible comment.

Jeers to Ed, Keebord, and Mongoose for theirs. Really, that's why people laugh at progressive rock fans. They just don't get it. This part was particularly good...

"YES like their cousins, King Crimson and Genesis wrote full-length novels of music while most of their rock n roll relatives were writing sentences and making a song out of one or two musical phrases."

Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, and Leonard Cohen are far more erudite and professional writers. None of them wrote emotionally void, sci-fi, pseudo-Ayn Rand bullcrap. Neither did they write pointlessly and vaguely "complex" songs. They did what was "right" emotionally and artistically for the song.

Yes' music will never mean anything next to Mozart, Wagner, or Satie. Give up that ridiculous argument.

See points 1, 4, and 5 in my post here (the very bottom): http://www.futurerocklegends.com/artist.php?artist_id=Kraftwerk

Why is this so difficult to understand?

The people I know who listen to progressive rock and buy into the "complexity" argument are guys with extremely long hair, black t-shirts, and black pants. They usually listen to metal as well. They always use the words "complex" and "philosophical" without ever expounding much on those concepts. Yep, that sure is the image that comes to mind when one mentions "sophistication". Give me a break.

Posted by Elastic Man on Wednesday, 06.10.09 @ 22:34pm


I've considered this "snubbing of progressive" issue where the Rock Hall Of Fame is concerned for awhile now; and I've come to the conclusion that it's sort of a red herring. If you define "progressive" as music that goes beyond the traditional two and a half minute song structures of a verse,chorus and another verse while lyrically going beyond boy meets girl leaves girl; then progressive really began as psychedelic in the mid 60s with groups like The Grateful Dead & The Jefferson Airplane. Then in 67' The Doors came along with their 1st album containing several songs over 7 minutes long.

I think 66'-67' is the time where prog began, it's just the name "progressive" wasn't what it was initially referred to.

If you also consider that British bands like Pink Floyd and Traffic were combining traditional rock with other musical forms like jazz and writing "cosmic" type lyrics in 67' as well, then this whole notion of "progressive" bands being excluded from The Hall Of Fame starts looking less valid.

The Dead & the Airplane are in. The Doors are in, and so is Traffic & Floyd. The Hall obviously considers those bands to be 1st wave prog. The only other 1st wave prog band not in really is The Moody Blues which is a shame.

Bands like Yes, ELP, Genesis are excluded probably cause they're condsidered 2nd wave.

Bands like Kansas, ELO, Styx, Rush are 3rd wave & have 0 chance whatsoever.

Posted by Arrow Man on Thursday, 06.11.09 @ 00:11am


^Truth well spoken.

Addendum to my hostile first post: I don't hate the type of progressive rock espoused here, I like King Crimson, Robert Wyatt, and Genesis, I just find the arguments and point of view misguided to the point of sheer silliness. There's a seeming inability to suss out any kind of musical radicalism that isn't based on the vague term "complexity".

For example: I would consider The Who Sell Out their definitive art-rock statement, far superior to the self-conscious serious works Tommy, Lifehouse, or Quadrophenia (in my opinion, narrative doesn't hold up on album.) Sell Out is an example of what art-rock really means but because it's composed of pop songs the hard heads here would completely disagree, missing out on perhaps the first post-modern masterpiece of popular music. They may like it just because it's the Who but it can't be as good as Tommy because it lacks...what's that word again?...oh, "complexity". Sell Out paints a great portrait of 60s youth and has far more to say than any Yes or ELP record. THAT'S complexity in my humble opinion.

Posted by Elastic Man on Thursday, 06.11.09 @ 03:40am


I've considered this "snubbing of progressive" issue where the Rock Hall Of Fame is concerned for awhile now; and I've come to the conclusion that it's sort of a red herring. If you define "progressive" as music that goes beyond the traditional two and a half minute song structures of a verse,chorus and another verse while lyrically going beyond boy meets girl leaves girl; then progressive really began as psychedelic in the mid 60s with groups like The Grateful Dead & The Jefferson Airplane. Then in 67' The Doors came along with their 1st album containing several songs over 7 minutes long.

I think 66'-67' is the time where prog began, it's just the name "progressive" wasn't what it was initially referred to.

Posted by Arrow Man on Thursday, 06.11.09 @ 00:11am
--------------------------------------------------
Please look up:

Ahmad Jamal - "But Not For Me/Jamal Live at the Pershing Room" - 1958

Check out Jamal's version of "Poinciana" - no lyrics, but well over 7 minutes long

the album sold a fair amount at that time, when rock was just kicking in, despite it being a full length jazz album.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Thursday, 06.11.09 @ 18:49pm


Great line from "Who Sell Out" song; Tattoo

"so me and my brother borrowed money from mother and got ourselves a tatoo, but his tatoo was of a lady in the nude and our mother thought that was extremely rude"

Correct, it is the best work The Who ever did and is timeless. It sounds more contemporary than any Who recording made after that one and that was in 1967. Second fav song on "Sell Out" "Our Love Was, Is". Pete and Rog sang such nice harmony together.

Posted by Ed on Thursday, 06.18.09 @ 17:15pm


Yes, Yes deserve induction(pardon the intentional redundancy). They do have a good influence factor on bands like Rush, Dream Theater, and Porcupine Tree to name a few.

Posted by Dude Man on Thursday, 07.23.09 @ 22:51pm


I love Yes, and I wish they were in the Hall. But you have to ask, "which Yes?" Isn't this part of the problem? Do you pick their supposed "best" lineup of Anderson-Bruford-Squire-Wakeman-Howe? What about Kaye and White? (I won't even suggest Rabin because Yes without Steve Howe is, well, No.) Can a band with so many personnel changes really be inducted? As I recall, when the Eagles went in, they chose the last (at the time) lineup, with Joe Walsh and Tim Schmit, though other members were in the band during their real heyday.

Posted by Bill on Tuesday, 08.18.09 @ 13:31pm


YES should have made it years ago, along with Deep Purple and the Moody Blues.

Posted by mark (and the gang) on Thursday, 08.20.09 @ 10:02am


No.

Posted by sookie on Thursday, 08.20.09 @ 11:47am


I forgot that Primus also list Yes as an influence.

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 09.7.09 @ 10:04am


Yes was one of the only progressive rock bands to have made it to the pop music world and back, not to mention everything in between. Every band member in the band from 1969 until 2009 was a virtuoso in his own instrument and had a very succesful solo career. See Rick Wakeman, or Steve Howe, or even Chris Squire, they all had a hit single or album. Why wasn't Yes added to the R&R Hall of Fame? If any progressive rock band should be inducted, it should be Yes, if not only for their sheer eclecticism and success.

Posted by What on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 10:37am


"Why wasn't Yes added to the R&R Hall of Fame?"-What

The average number of stars a Yes album gets from Rolling Stone is 2.5 and on their main page on RS's site they mentioned Yes's, "often overbearing pretentiousness" and being "bizarre and fleeting -- if totally unrealistic --"

Posted by Dude Man on Monday, 09.28.09 @ 10:45am


Three words describes why Yes won't get into the RRHOF and it's a shame:

Jann hates prog!

Posted by Jann hates prog on Wednesday, 09.30.09 @ 23:31pm


The Rock Hall is a subjective sham. They simply do not like art rock/progressive bands.

Posted by Tippersnore on Sunday, 11.8.09 @ 18:52pm


Tippersnore,

The RRHOF has Genesis as one of its nominees for 2010. Genesis are in the Prog?ART Rock vein.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Monday, 11.9.09 @ 08:23am


> Genesis are in the Prog?

The pop prog years with Collins on lead vocals made the difference I'm afraid.

With crap like Madonna in the RaRHoF, I actually wish my favorite bands like Yes, Procol Harum, ELP and Deep Purple don't make it.

DEAN

Posted by Dean on Sunday, 11.29.09 @ 14:50pm


The R&R HOF is a joke.

I love and seen YES so many times over the years.
All Yes fans know that they're not for everyone but for so many us they really did it up greatly live and in the studio.
Time will be very kind to Yes moreso than many other groups in the so called Rock and Roll Hall of Lame

Posted by Francesco Di Pacelli on Saturday, 12.19.09 @ 07:05am


Yes not being in the RRHOF makes the hall meaningless. The fact that Genesis got in in probably because of their pop hits...this is now as irrelevant as the Grammy's or other crap that I don't even pay attention to. Oh and btw - - I am in the music industry

Posted by mm on Monday, 04.5.10 @ 20:51pm


"I can get a group of thugs to learn the Ramones catalog of songs. And what does Grandmaster Flash do? Play a turntable?" - anthony rubbo

I get a bit annoyed sometimes about the complaints about rap ("But I got a dance at the prom because of Boston and REO Speedwagon! That's, like, so rock 'n' roll!") I wonder how many people have realized the irony of declaring war against a rebellious artform (since, you know, rebellion and going against the grain was what rock was founded upon) whilst wanting to induct soulless, unimportant, redundant classic rock acts (no, I don't put Yes in that category.) Get out of the 60's and 70's already. And what's with the punk bashing? Three or four chords was what rock was founded upon, and sometimes it feels much better and moves you more than technically challenging stuff. Denying The Ramones' influence, and thus their place in the Hall, is a waste of time.

"As the commercial goes...
Rush tee shirt...$40.00
Porcupine Tree cd...$16.00
non-commercial music...priceless
Keep on going Hall of Fame, I hope you live on for 100 years, and that prog rock dances on your grave after you die out!" - Robert

Good man. Thank you for giving Porcupine Tree some love; very underrated. I'd like the Hall to shut it's doors now, though. Sell everything and donate the proceeds to charity, that would be the honorable thing to do at this point.

I'm not even that big a fan of prog (though as I said, I love Porcupine Tree, and love Pink Floyd.) With that said, snubbing most of a genre due to personal taste (they've done this with other subgenres as well) almost completely destroys the Hall's credibility. Yes are very talented musicians, and if what Anon said is correct, they've influenced Rush, who I know are very influential. Yes to Yes (pun intended), King Crimson, ELP and Rush, maybe to Jethro Tull and no to Kansas and Styx (sorry, no innovation to speak of and no lasting influence.)

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 19:06pm


Yes not being in the RRHoF is just silly. Not popular enough?? They sold out Madison Square Garden several times in their heyday!! Without advertising. And large arenas all over the world. And they did so for at least 3 decades!

While a number of other artists in the RRHoF are touring Norway with a couple of hundred people in the audience, a prog band like Genesis plays for 500.000 in Rome. And prog rock is practically left out of RRHoF. This was the rock style of the 70s. Pop and disco is not rock.



Posted by roger on Monday, 08.23.10 @ 05:53am


Genesis are in the Hall, and "rock" is a broad definition, so pop and disco could fit. Otherwise, I fully agree with you. Yes is way overdue.

Posted by Sam on Tuesday, 08.24.10 @ 20:04pm


Yes Resumes

VOCALS

Jon Anderson - Yes, The Warriors, Jon & Vangelis

Trevor Horn - The Buggles, Yes, The Art of Noise

GUITAR

Peter Banks - Yes, Empire

Steve Howe - Yes, Asia

Trevor Rabin - Yes

KEYBOARDS

Tony Kaye - Yes, Badfinger, Badger, Johnny & the Hurricanes

Rick Wakeman - Yes, The Strawbs

Patrick Moraz - Yes, Refugee, The Moody Blues

Geoffrey Downes - Yes, The Buggles, Asia, Icon

BASS

Chris Squire - Yes, Syn, The Selfs

DRUMS

Bill Bruford - Yes, King Crimson

Alan White - Yes, The Plastic Ono Band

OTHER

GUITAR AND KEYBOARDS

Billy Sherwood - Boston, Blue Oyster Cult, Yes, Asia, Rush

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 08.25.10 @ 05:05am


Roy,

You forgot about GTR as part of Steve Howe 's resume

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Wednesday, 08.25.10 @ 15:44pm


Overproduced self-indulgent crap.

Posted by P.Onyou on Thursday, 09.30.10 @ 23:04pm


Well my friends, the Genesis induction was false hope. Do you think any of the remaining worthy prog bands will get in before any of their key members die?

Posted by Sam on Friday, 10.1.10 @ 10:17am


Jon Anderson talked to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette two years ago, and this is an extract from it:

Have to ask you this: How do you feel about not being recognized by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?

"I'm am so annoyed! So [angry]! You can quote me on that. [Dramatic pause.] No, I don't care. [Laughs.] When it happens, it will happen. It never bothered me until 10 years ago. The manager who was managing Yes said 'I'm going to put you in the Hall of Fame next year' and we said 'cool.' And then it didn't happen. We said, 'What happened?' He said, 'They don't want you.' It went on for five, six years, with him making this pitch. ... When it happens it will happen."

It's not just you, it's a slight to the whole genre -- Genesis, King Crimson, etc.

"Well, that's OK, you can't expect people to like, uh, yellow paint all the time. They don't like custard. And that's the way it is sometimes. The three or four people who run the whole thing don't like custard, and we're custard. La di da."

Naturally, he's going to be asked about it, so I suspect after all this years he's just shrugging it off and taking the high road.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08066/862775-42.stm#ixzz13qFJ2uwX

Posted by Sam on Saturday, 10.30.10 @ 05:53am


R&RHoF caters to Americans. Americans are stupid. Yes is not stupid. Yes doesn't get in the R&RHoF. It's not rocket science people.

Britain has one-sixth the people that the US has and yet they have produced 50 times as much great rock and roll as the US (Neil Young is from Canada). If fact, they saved the US from that drivel and clap trap the culture distorters were trying to cram down our throats in the 50s and 60s. Finally, the culture distorters struck back with disco, moved on to rap, and the rest is history, as are we. Now we are reduced to singers, backed up by dancers instead of musicians. Just like the 50s, where we always had four or five losers singing a song someone else wrote for them with no sign of a band anywhere.

Posted by Alan on Sunday, 11.21.10 @ 20:30pm


Britain has one-sixth the people that the US has and yet they have produced 50 times as much great rock and roll as the US (Neil Young is from Canada). If fact, they saved the US from that drivel and clap trap the culture distorters were trying to cram down our throats in the 50s and 60s. Finally, the culture distorters struck back with disco, moved on to rap, and the rest is history, as are we. Now we are reduced to singers, backed up by dancers instead of musicians. Just like the 50s, where we always had four or five losers singing a song someone else wrote for them with no sign of a band anywhere.

Posted by Alan on Sunday, 11.21.10 @ 20:30pm
--------------------------------------------------
I am assuming you are writing from somewhere in the UK, or perhaps in Canada, since you purposely singled out Neil Young. Your contention that America is bad because they haven't inducted Yes or Roxy Music is absurd. Are they notable omissions? Yes.

In regards to Britain producing 50x's worth of better rock than the US... a reminder:

Elvis Presley / Little Richard / Chuck Berry
Jerry Lee Lewis / Buddy Holly / Dick Dale
Link Wray / Chubby Checker / Bob Dylan
Beach Boys / Byrds / Grateful Dead
Jeff. Airplane / Jimi Hendrix / Doors
Velvet Underground / Sly & the Family Stone
CCR / Janis Joplin / James Brown
The WHOLE of MOTOWN / Santana / CSN
Allman Bros / Skynyrd / Eagles / F. Zappa
Alice Cooper / Aerosmith / Kiss / S. Miller
Boston / Journey / Ramones / Black Flag
Funkadelic / Earth, Wind, & Fire / M. Jackson
Sonic Youth / Bad Brains / Talking Heads / Prince
Metallica / REM / Replacements / Husker Du
Megadeth / Anthrax / Faith No More / Pixies
Nirvana / Pearl Jam / Alice In Chains / STP
Soundgarden / Smashing Pumpkins / NIN / Green Day
White Stripes / QOTSA

Just a little reminder of the variety we've managed to produce.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Monday, 11.22.10 @ 05:02am


"Chubby Checker/Eagles/Kiss/S. Miller/Boston/Journey/STP/Green Day"

I'm pretty sure that mentioning these artists didn't help your argument at all... no Stooges, MC5 or Beefheart? Not to mention hip hop and electronica...

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 11.22.10 @ 07:58am


"Chubby Checker/Eagles/Kiss/S. Miller/Boston/Journey/STP/Green Day"

I'm pretty sure that mentioning these artists didn't help your argument at all... no Stooges, MC5 or Beefheart? Not to mention hip hop and electronica...

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 11.22.10 @ 07:58am


--------------------------------------------------
There are folks who like those artists. The list was not meant as any kind of one-upsmanship in any way. Just a minor overview based on simple variety.

I have no wish to out-nerd my fellow man...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 17:52pm


"I have no wish to out-nerd my fellow man..."

I'm detecting a slight hint of musical anti-intellectualism.

If what you wished was to successfully represent America's musical variety compared to that of the UK's, than you failed.

The people who like those artists are more than likely irrelevant in this argument because they have probably never heard (much less heard OF) a lot of the artists that have consistently kept the UK on music's cutting edge (post-Beatles).

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 18:06pm


That's not to say the original poster ("Alan")'s drivel was correct.

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 18:08pm


"I have no wish to out-nerd my fellow man..."

I'm detecting a slight hint of musical anti-intellectualism.

If what you wished was to successfully represent America's musical variety compared to that of the UK's, than you failed.

The people who like those artists are more than likely irrelevant in this argument because they have probably never heard (much less heard OF) a lot of the artists that have consistently kept the UK on music's cutting edge (post-Beatles).

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 11.23.10 @ 18:06pm
--------------------------------------------------
And I am detecting a hint of musical elitism in your comments.

I believe I did o.k. in my listing.

I like to believe that it's still possible for the best rock & roll to be found at or near the top of the charts. While I understand the whole "indie/ethic" ideal, I happen to feel it inadvertently sabotages the music by keeping it bottled up in the hands of the few, instead of the many. It will be impossible for any new rock to have the same impact the bands of the 20th century had if this continues to be the case.

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 11.24.10 @ 20:00pm


"I like to believe that it's still possible for the best rock & roll to be found at or near the top of the charts."

Possible, yes. Probable, I highly doubt it. You seem to be forgetting one big thing C2 -- to paraphrase Frank Zappa, "People are morons".

Conversely, I believe that the shit will (nearly) always rise to the top. Obviously there are exceptions.

"I happen to feel it inadvertently sabotages the music by keeping it bottled up in the hands of the few, instead of the many."

The few being the people who actually give a shit about music, the many being the opiated masses, right?

Posted by Chalkie on Wednesday, 11.24.10 @ 20:26pm


As an Englishman who just returned to the UK after a decade in the US, I must say both Cheesecrop and Chalkie have some good point. Whatever point Alan was trying to make there was ruined by moronic and eletist statements, though I agreed with a couple of his points.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 11.26.10 @ 06:44am


"I like to believe that it's still possible for the best rock & roll to be found at or near the top of the charts."

Possible, yes. Probable, I highly doubt it. You seem to be forgetting one big thing C2 -- to paraphrase Frank Zappa, "People are morons".

Conversely, I believe that the shit will (nearly) always rise to the top. Obviously there are exceptions.

"I happen to feel it inadvertently sabotages the music by keeping it bottled up in the hands of the few, instead of the many."

The few being the people who actually give a shit about music, the many being the opiated masses, right?

Posted by Chalkie on Wednesday, 11.24.10 @ 20:26pm
--------------------------------------------------
Still too elitist, Chalkdust. Beatles/Stones had a pile of #1's... Zeppelin, Elvis, M. Jackson, Nirvana, P. Jam, Metallica, REM, U2... there's a lot of exceptions.

I'm in my mid-30's Chalk. I grew up at a time when the top rock & roll regularly hit the charts in a good position. Either at #1 or pretty darn close. It should be that way - good R & R should be at or near the top of the charts.

Best ex. - Beatles. I once read that in the fall of 1963, D. Clark gave "She Loves You" a spin on Amer. Bandstand, when the record was still on Vee Jay Records or some small label. The kids shot the thing down, only gave it a fair grade. Couple months later, behind Columbia Records $, the Fabs are everywhere. We're talking less than a yr. here. The same "kids" who shot it down would have been in the very same high school grade. You'd have to accept that young people in America would've bought their musical tastes on a 90 day same-as-cash plan not to recognize a woolen odor lurking about, circa 64. Yet no one dares question it in relation to the modern day.

Give everyone credit for making picks that work. By your logic, 'She Loves You" would've been great on Vee-Jay, but worthless on Columbia, only cause the sheep pumped it up. But as messrs. Page, Plant, Bonham, & Jones once remarked... "The Song Remains The Same".

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 11.26.10 @ 13:29pm


You can find plenty of quality artists that were succesful, and also plenty of mainstream artists who could be accurately described by a certain Oasis song: "Your music's shite/It keeps me up all night" (but I digress). Probably the same holds true for the underground, but Chalkie would know better than me. It is true, however, that you need to look harder these days to find the good stuff, as the Top 40 just isn't doing it for the most part.

Posted by Sam on Wednesday, 12.1.10 @ 16:54pm


personally, i think there should induct another prog rock band for the 2012 ceremony, either rush, moody blues, or yes because other than guns and roses who should get in next year first-ballot, what other artists or bands is there to induct, i think jann wenner should get his head out of his ass, and focus more on the prog movement with one of those three that i mentioned above, cause this is ridiculous not honoring these bands who are just as important to rock, than so-called abba or the bee gees, who are irrelevant to rock as it is. so focus on that prog movement, shall we?

Posted by chris on Wednesday, 01.12.11 @ 12:19pm


"who should get in next year first-ballot"

Soundgarden? The Melvins? Eric B. & Rakim?

But yes, there should be a prog slot reserved. 5 inductees a year is too little, but if you can get one deserving prog band in next year and continue that for several years then you can clear up the prog backlog within about 6-8 (or 9?) years, and then turn your attention elsewhere.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 01.14.11 @ 16:27pm


Unfortunately, that's unlikely to happen. Seriously, with 15 nominees, and restricting voters to five selections. Terrible.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 01.15.11 @ 09:15am


So the Rock Hall doesn't like Prog because by drawing from classical elements, prog rock implied to some that rock itself wasn’t artistically interesting or important enough to contain its complex ideas. And for many critics prog strayed too far from rock’s African-American origins, reinforcing the stereotype that associated European music with the intellect and African music with the body. Prog rockers considered Bo Diddley too simple. In other words, Europeans use their heads to write music (that's Prog), while Africans use their private parts to write music (that's Rock). Furthermore, Europeans are intellectuals and Africans are sex crazed.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.20.11 @ 04:03am


I agree. 5 a year is too little.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 01.23.11 @ 08:03am


The joke that is called the RRHOF continues to exist in spite of many years of crap being inducted. The only way this will stop is to ignore them all together and let them die out. If the head of the RRHOF was dying of thirst I wouldn't give him a drop of water!!

Posted by Numb on Sunday, 01.23.11 @ 23:44pm


well, then. jann wenner needs to get his head out of his ass, and start inducting prog rock bands, regardless if u like them or not. the fans do and they want to see them get rewarded for their accomplishments.

Posted by chris on Friday, 02.25.11 @ 08:36am


They seem to be operating on a biggest selling basis for prog, I don't think Gensis deserved to be inducted over Yes, not in a million years but since Genesis has sold so much (mostly due to the more commercial driection they took after Gabriel left) they get inducted.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 02.25.11 @ 09:00am


Some interesting posts on here, some have struck out and I'll respond to them:

"This band (Yes) stand as the absolute definitions of 'self-indulgence' and 'instrumental wankery.' - Liam

With all due respect I think the term "self-indulgent" when referring to music (actually all forms of art) can be divided into two categories. 1) The egomaniacal, narcissistic drive that leads an artist into creating a work (be it a film, painting or in this case song/album) whereby they attempt to impose their talent (which may or may not be present) upon others with the sole purpose of proving how much better they are than everybody else (you can call this trying too hard and not succeeding or pretentious if you wish) and 2) the act of actually attempting to showcase a specific aspect they were trying to convey through a medium without any sort of personal, self-importance forced on others, basically the art speaks for itself and any sort of bias the creator may have is not significantly forced upon you. However, the artist's obsession with the matter at hand is still obvious (which isn't necessarily bad thing) As for "instrumental wankery," I'm not sure whether you were being literal or not ;)

-----------------------------------------

"It's not a matter of a group or artist being 'too this' or 'too that'. It's a matter of a select few forcing their will (and personal opinion) on the rest of us. It shouldn't be about Rolling Stone magazine (which, by the way, lost all credibility with me by putting that 'mutt' American Idol runnerup on the cover) & 'friends'" - Gitarzan

Absolutely right. It's a pity Gitarzan doesn't post much on here anymore. Couldn't have said it better myself.

---------------------------------------

"The Dead & the Airplane are in. The Doors are in, and so is Traffic & Floyd. The Hall obviously considers those bands to be 1st wave prog. The only other 1st wave prog band not in really is The Moody Blues which is a shame.

Bands like Yes, ELP, Genesis are excluded probably cause they're condsidered 2nd wave.

Bands like Kansas, ELO, Styx, Rush are 3rd wave & have 0 chance whatsoever." - Arrow Man

I think this is an interesting way of looking at it, though this no longer applies to Genesis and maybe not to Yes for too much longer.

------------------------------------

"Please look up:

Ahmad Jamal - 'But Not For Me/Jamal Live at the Pershing Room' - 1958

Check out Jamal's version of 'Poinciana' - no lyrics, but well over 7 minutes long" - Cheesecrop

Very interesting. Thanks for the suggestion.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 02.25.11 @ 12:34pm


"Also, any group or artists who claim it's (the RRHOF) not important to them are LYING (that includes the Sex Pistols...if they really didn't care, they just simply wouldn't have shown up and not made any statements)." - Gitarzan

Truth well spoken!

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 02.25.11 @ 12:38pm


"The Dead & the Airplane are in. The Doors are in, and so is Traffic & Floyd. The Hall obviously considers those bands to be 1st wave prog. The only other 1st wave prog band not in really is The Moody Blues which is a shame.

Bands like Yes, ELP, Genesis are excluded probably cause they're condsidered 2nd wave.

Bands like Kansas, ELO, Styx, Rush are 3rd wave & have 0 chance whatsoever." - Arrow Man

I'm not sure if they thought that way about the Dead, Airplane and The Doors, but yeah I think many people do consider Traffic and Floyd to be prog, and The Doors do have some stuff that could be considered prog, so I'm not sure where people were going with the "no prog" thing. Genesis is now in (though primarily because of the Collins years probably), and I think Yes will be in soon. King Crimson and ELP will continue to be snubbed, as will Procol Harum (first wave) and the other bands mentioned.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 03.3.11 @ 04:54am


Genesis is now in (though primarily because of the Collins years probably), and I think Yes will be in soon. King Crimson and ELP will continue to be snubbed, as will Procol Harum (first wave) and the other bands mentioned.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 03.3.11 @ 04:54am

I could actually see them eventually getting around to Procol Harum, though this would probably have more to do with the current regime's 60's nostalgia, especially over songs like "A Whiter Shade of Pale" rather than Procol Harum's actually importance in terms of influence and innovation, unfortunately. I guess it's kind of similar to people saying Genesis got in because of the Collins years, not because of the overall importance of Genesis. I agree that Yes could get in at some point, and you're right that ELP and King Crimson will continue to be snubbed.

I potentially could see them going for Jethro Tull at some point too, but again, this might be because they're the least "prog" of the so-called prog heavyweights. (Same with the Moody Blues, thanks to their first album).

I've already discussed why I think the prog label isn't even a totally appropriate label for Jethro Tull on their page. (So has Sam).

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 03.31.11 @ 15:24pm


While I think the Collins era helped Genesis get in, I think a big part of it was it was the best way to get Peter Gabriel and Phil Collins into the Hall of Fame in some capacity. Also I don't think the Hall totally disregarded the prog era of Genesis as the picked Phish to be their presenter/performer where they played the Gabriel era stuff.

Posted by Gassman on Thursday, 03.31.11 @ 15:45pm


I also think that Peter Gabriel solo should get in eventually, but that's not as pressing an issue.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 04.1.11 @ 13:44pm


Yes has a new album out!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.28.11 @ 23:11pm


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ex-yes-frontman-jon-anderson-opens-up-about-getting-fired-20110706

Rolling Stone Magazine mentions Yes

Ex-Yes Frontman Jon Anderson Opens Up About Getting Fired: As the band gets ready to release a new album and go on tour, Anderson is still bitter about how he was treated

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.8.11 @ 06:52am


Yes is touring with Styx this Summer!

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.8.11 @ 06:54am


What do the albums "4 Way Street" by CSNY and "Yessongs" have in common?

1. They are both live albums
2. Both were originally issued on Atlantic Records and...
3. Both had audience members shouting out, "Go get 'em, Stephen"

On "4 Way Street" after Neil Young finishes "Don't Let It Bring You Down" he introduces Stephen Stills an audience member shouts "Go get 'em, Stephen" On "Yessongs" just before the band plays "Heart of The Sunrise" an audience member shouts "Go get 'em, Stephen" This is a reference to guitarist Stephen James "Steve" Howe, who is not referred to by name on the audio of "Yessongs" but Yes fans know his name from reading album covers and inner sleeves

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Monday, 07.18.11 @ 04:07am


Most definetly. the halls biggest prog rock snub.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 09.3.11 @ 16:20pm


When it comes to prog rock, they started and stopped with Pink Floyd. Genesis were not inducted based on their Gabriel/early Collins era. Had the "commercialized" Genesis from the post-Hackett era never existed, they'd still be waiting outside in the cold along with Yes, ELP, and King Crimson. Yes should be inducted (in total) into the HOF based on the body of work they created from 1971 to 1978 alone - much less anything they did following that. That committee and its governing are so disgusted with anything that remotely resembles prog rock that they won't even consider the "hybrid" groups who used elements of prog but still managed to succeed commercially, like Moody Blues, ELO, Rush, and Styx. Every single one of the aforementioned acts are deserving of being enshrined in the Hall. Those same "powers that be" have left out straightforward commercial successes like Journey and Chicago as well. Yet - they induct Dave Clark Five and nominate Bon Jovi. I agree with a previous poster here - it's a Hall of Sham.

Posted by Vince S on Wednesday, 10.12.11 @ 13:35pm


By any parameters the RRHOF can articulate, Yes should have been a shoo-in vote.

Posted by Skip on Thursday, 11.17.11 @ 05:36am


A few thoughts & highlights come to mind:

The 20 minute standing ovation at Madison Square Garden

The first ROCK band to sell-out the Spectrum in Philadelphia for three consecutive concert dates

The main event for 150,000 fans in a sold-out John F. Kennedy Stadium - Philly - show in 1976

All the remarkable tours - nearly all sold-out - during the 70's, 80's, 90's and beyond. Each tour provided state-of-the-art sound, lighting, and stage design

The Magnification world tour which included local symphony orchestras from each city

The 30th anniversary tour with the classic line-up of Andeson, Squire, Howe, White, & Wakeman playing an electric set which included South Side of the Sky. This performance continued after a short intermission with amazing accoustic renditions of several hits including Roundabout, and then continued with several more "electric" songs like Rythem of Love, and Starship Trooper.

A band that continues to be universally recognized for producing music that is ahead of it's time

A level of professionalism & musical excellence that has been the band's trademark for decades

So when I think about it, perhaps the RRHofF is not big enough for a band of Yes' stature



Posted by Jay B on Monday, 12.26.11 @ 19:34pm


As is the case with Rush, Yes's level of musicianship is light years ahead of most every inductee that is already there. Musical Excellence? Hardly a more significant or talented band to the progressive rock genre. Incredible complexity and beauty in their music and their concerts were always phenomenal. The snub comes from their just not fitting the mold of the Rock Star.. cripes there are so many in the hall that have ZERO to do with rock music but there they are anyway.. oh well, doltish folk that are the voters know little about true class... yes, ELP missing too.. absurd.

Posted by Paul Thomas on Saturday, 05.12.12 @ 19:44pm


There were so many amazing songs and moments coming out of the world of Progressive Rock. The Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame's opinion is highly overrated. Simpletons sit at its desk, they are "lofi" money grubbers, not adventurous music lovers. "Yes" are rock legends.

Posted by Majestic's Media Cloud on Wednesday, 05.16.12 @ 12:06pm


Honestly it just sounds like a lot of over-analytical intellectual onanism to me (I'm not saying you're wrong, CCJR, I'm referencing Onkey's comments).

Listen to the music for yourself and if you think it holds up, good for you. If it doesn't, listen to something else.

Rather simple, isn't it?

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Sunday, 05.27.12 @ 07:37am


All this talk of straying from R&B and stuff reminds me of an article that says The beatles killed rock by making their music less R&B like and more poppish, and then by going beyond simple rock. An incredibly stupid thing to say, who'd want to listen to R&B for the next 50 years when we could have all the great bands the Beatles inspired?

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 05.27.12 @ 08:06am


I'm on the fence with your comments, GFW.

On the one hand, I agree that rock 'n' roll would be pretty dull if it hadn't advanced past, say, 1959. That would mean no David Bowie, no Roxy Music, no Judas Priest, no Alice Cooper, no Cars, no Velvet Underground, no Gary Numan, no Queen, and a whole host of other exciting acts who took rock 'n' roll in new, creative directions. I can't imagine living in a world without a copy of Diamond Dogs or The Pleasure Principle. As partial as I am to pre-1960s music, I love much of what came after the 1950s and would be very sad if Bowie, Queen, Numan, et al never came to pass.

I too don't agree with the statement that The Beatles killed rock 'n' roll. However, IMHO, they did make it palatable for upper middle class/upper-class types who sneered their noses at the racy, unpolished musical stylings of Little Richard, Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, and the rest of the 1950s innovators. All of a sudden, it became respectable to like rock 'n' roll. Witness Arthur Fiedler's (the Kenny G of classical) Beatles covers or Leonard Bernstein's (ditto) praise of The Beatles. Rock 'n' roll did lose its ability to frighten the older generations when The Beatles came on the scene, although Alice Cooper and David Bowie made sure to revive that fright factor in the early 1970s.

Now I'm not saying that polished music is bad and unpolished music is good, but I hate this classist attitude that genres like R&B (the 1940s/1950s kind), rockabilly, and blues are all "unrefined" music while classical, progressive rock, and free jazz are "refined" music. That's a load of BS.

I also disagree that rock 'n' roll "grew up" when the likes of Bob Dylan and The Beatles emerged. Music is not just about the lyrics, it also encompasses the instruments, the recording techniques, the vocals, the SFX, to name some other elements. The Ray Ellis Orchestra backed Buddy Holly's "True Love Ways." The Coasters' "Just Like A Fool" is a straight pop number sans the trademark comedic lyrics. Eddie Cochran's "Three Steps to Heaven" showcases an uncharacteristically-mellow guitar by Cochran and harmonious backing vocals by The Crickets. There's tons of other examples of 1950s rock songs with "sophisticated" production values besides these three.

Last time I checked, music doesn't need socially conscious lyrics to be mature. If anything, socially conscious/politically-charged lyrics date a song. That's why dreck like Eve of Destruction is all but forgotten while a timeless classic like Think (no political overtones in the lyrics) has transcendent power.

I like what John Waters(director of Pink Flamingos, Polyester, Female Trouble, and other "bad taste" cult classics) once said about The Beatles in an interview with Details Magazine. Here's the entire quote:

"I don’t want to say I hate the Beatles. I don’t own any of their records. They ruined rock and roll. They put Motown out of business. So I never bought a new record ever until punk came out. The Beatles led to the Monkees. And it was a little hard hearing Lennon sing about "no possessions" when he was living in the Dakota. I was a yippee. Hippies got on my nerves. We made fun of hippies. I didn’t know it, but I was waiting for punk. And so that’s what I mean about the Beatles. I know they were amazing songwriters and all that, but I liked the Rolling Stones. I would’ve rather been at Altamont than Woodstock."

Posted by Zach on Friday, 06.8.12 @ 19:15pm


On the one hand, I agree that rock 'n' roll would be pretty dull if it hadn't advanced past, say, 1959. That would mean no David Bowie, no Roxy Music, no Judas Priest, no Alice Cooper, no Cars, no Velvet Underground, no Gary Numan, no Queen, and a whole host of other exciting acts who took rock 'n' roll in new, creative directions. I can't imagine living in a world without a copy of Diamond Dogs or The Pleasure Principle. As partial as I am to pre-1960s music, I love much of what came after the 1950s and would be very sad if Bowie, Queen, Numan, et al never came to pass.

I too don't agree with the statement that The Beatles killed rock 'n' roll. However, IMHO, they did make it palatable for upper middle class/upper-class types who sneered their noses at the racy, unpolished musical stylings of Little Richard, Fats Domino, Jerry Lee Lewis, and the rest of the 1950s innovators. All of a sudden, it became respectable to like rock 'n' roll.

Posted by Zach on Friday, 06.8.12 @ 19:15pm
--------------------------------------------------
You'd have seen this world anyway, only it would've looked slightly diff., & it would've had different beginning and end points.

Consider the diff. looks that Bowie, T-Rex, etc., had, as opposed to Kiss, Alice Cooper, et. al. One is a distinctly Americanized version of glitter/glam, while the other is more English in it's stylings. You would've seen something that resembled an American glam - maybe slightly diff., but still something a'la Kiss - perhaps later down the line.

The sophisticates who you bemoan still would've arrived at rock & roll. They just would've shown up a bit later. The Beatles hastened the rush, but there were already sonic advances going on before the Beatles arrived. You know about all the surf & instrumental groups, so I won't delve into them. Suffice to say, had the technical advancements continued as they did, rock & roll - the MUSIC - would've kept going as well. I'm willing to bet that around 1967 or 68, some university kids doing a sociological project would've stumbled upon a music that was diff. from where the Beatles took the music, yet at the same time more advanced than where Elvis left it. This would've been the rock & roll that you questioned above.

There's no way the separation could've gone on forever. It may have come out diff. - a little less of the socio-political stuff (no doubt you'd like that :) , but a fair amount of it would have stayed the same. It just would be pushed back, i.e. 1969 would be when folk-rock kicked in, no metal till 1973 or so, etc., etc, on...

Posted by Cheesecrop on Saturday, 06.9.12 @ 08:00am


Songs that should have been James Bond themes as well as the movie titles:

Owner Of A Lonely Heart by Yes, and Some Like It Hot by Power Station would have sounded great in the opening credits of James Bond movies with Roger Moore in the 80s.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 09.22.12 @ 00:16am


The most influential band of an entire genre...vote Yes!

Posted by Jim E on Friday, 11.2.12 @ 16:59pm


Yes' chances of being inducted just went up exponentially. Rush's induction will finally open the door for "progressive rock."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.3.13 @ 13:14pm


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/yes-chris-squire-on-their-classic-album-tour-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-20130204

Yes' bassist Chris Squire on Rush, King Crimson, Chicago and the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Rush are getting inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Are you at all miffed they got it before you?

[Laughs] No, I can't object to that. Logistically, it's probably difficult for whoever the committee is to bring in Yes. Rush is fairly simple. It's the same three guys and always has been. They deserve to be there, no doubt about that. But there still seems to be a certain bias towards early-Seventies prog rock bands like Yes and King Crimson.

I still think it's weird that Chicago isn't in. That to me is odd. In our case, we're on our 18th member. If we ever do get inducted, it would be only fair to have all the members, old and new. So that may be a problem for the committee. I don't know.

But you're not angry about it?

No, of course not. I've got plenty of other awards. [Laughs]

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 02.12.13 @ 14:55pm


RIP, Peter Banks

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Tuesday, 03.12.13 @ 23:33pm


Peter Banks was the original guitarist for Yes (he was replaced on the third album by Steve Howe). While not as revered as Howe, Banks was quite skilled and added a lot to the band. He also gave the band its name.

Banks was fired when he butted heads with Jon Anderson. Following his departure, he formed the band Flash which had a degree of success (3 albums and 4 US tours). After that point, his career declined. In 1989, when the band had a reunion tour (in support of the Union album), Banks was the only original member not allowed to participate.

Last week, he died of heart disease in London. Reports are that he was indigent. He had no family. A week later, his body is still unclaimed in the morgue. Fans are being asked to donate money to cover the cost of his cremation.

From the Yes Facebook page:

In a shocking turn of events, the body of Peter Banks — co-founder of the group Yes, and someone dubbed an architect of progressive music by the BBC — reportedly remains unclaimed.

Nic Caciappo asked that we post the following regarding the state of Peter's remains, and how you can help. If you have any questions Nic advised to send him or George Mizer a message via Facebook. More updates as this develops. Thanks.

Friends of Yes & in particular Peter Banks. It has been since last Thursday Mar 7 that Peter passed away. He found at his home on Fri Mar 8. His body is still in the morgue and not being claimed because he has no family, and only an ex-wife who doesn't wish to assist. He may be cremated by the morgue and his belongings taken into custody by authorities. His ex needs to at least to tell the morgue that his friend(s) can take over. Then, they will want fees for cremation and delivery of his remains. Peter's belongings are still safe. But, there will be a need to sort this out with helping hands.

There is now a PayPal account set up to donate, which is connected to Pete's friend of 40+ years, George Mizer. I stand by George, he is a good friend.

The PayPal account is: themiz@peterbanks.net and ready to accept any donation amount. The expenses that will need to be covered are cremation, urn, possible travel from USA to London, other fees and expenses regarding Peter's belongings which could be auctioned to help pay for this as well. Again, the account is themiz@peterbanks.net.

Fans are paying for his cremation?
I hope that public embarrassment causes the band to pony up $900 for the cremation.

This is sad.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.2.13 @ 11:09am


My most sincere condolences on Peter Banks' passing.

As far as Yes is concerned, their work is certainly quite diverse. In my honest opinion, they have quite a few masterpieces amongst their discography, such as: "The Yes Album," "Fragile," "Close To The Edge," "Tales From Topographic Oceans," "Going For The One," "90125," "Keys To Ascension 1 & 2," "Magnification" and "Yes Symphonic." Unfortunately, they also have quite a few "less than great" recordings: "Tormato," "Drama," "Big Generator" and "Fly From Here." Then they have a few albums that leave little to be desired: "Union," "Talk" and "Open Your Eyes." Plus, the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame might be considering the logistics of inducting every member. My guess is that they will center the inductees around those of the Classic Yes era. That means that they will probably include the following members: Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, Bill Bruford and Alan White. If they include 90125 era Yes, then they would add Trevor Rabin and Tony Kaye to the inductee list. Unfortunately, this may not include Peter Banks, Tony Levin (who deserves a spot with King Crimson), Benoit David, Oliver Wakeman, Geoff Downes, or Trevor Horn. The idea of playing "The Yes Album," "Close To The Edge" and "Going For The One" in their entirety was a great one, that helps expose a new audience to their older classics. Bringing Jon Anderson back would probably be a good idea as well. Seeing Yes without Jon Anderson for many fans, would be akin to seeing Rush sans Geddy Lee.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 05.6.13 @ 04:02am


Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Peter Banks (1968-1970: guitar)
03. Chris Squire (1968-Present: bass)
04. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
05. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
06. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
07. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
08. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
09. Patrick Moraz (1974-1976: keyboards, The Moody Blues)
10. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 05.23.13 @ 10:18am


Prior to their induction, I would really like to see Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman return to Yes. Wouldn't you?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 05.31.13 @ 09:31am


Yes. Chris Squire is wrong. The Rock Hall knows exactly which members to induct. Only the first 10. The other 8 were very late arrivals

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.31.13 @ 10:29am


https://rockhall.com/event/yes/

Tuesday, August 6, 7PM

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Legends Series with Yes

Posted by Roy on Friday, 07.26.13 @ 22:28pm


yes to Yes ..lol

Posted by Happy on Saturday, 07.27.13 @ 01:20am


Let's talk about Yes, shall we? I have been an aficionado of most of their music for the past 32 years. Here are my ratings of their studio and live albums:

Let's look at their studio albums first, shall we?

Yes ***
Time And A Word ***

The Yes Album *****
Fragile *****
Close To The Edge *****

Tales From Topographic Oceans *****
Relayer ****
Going For The One *****
Tormato ***
Drama ****

90125 *****
Big Generator ***
Union **1/2
Talk *

Keys To Ascension *****
Keys To Ascension 2 *****
Keystudio *****
Open Your Eyes **
The Ladder ****

Magnification *****
Fly From Here ***1/2

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 08.7.13 @ 10:02am



https://rockhall.com/blog/post/9907_yes-rock-hall-of-fame-progressive-rock-interview/

Yes Talk About Future of Progressive Rock, Performing in China, Foo Fighters, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Tour

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.10.13 @ 01:02am


I think that if the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame conducted another fan poll (the same one which RUSH won), and Yes was included, they would be the #1 fan choice

Posted by Barry on Monday, 08.26.13 @ 10:10am


I think that if the Rock N Roll Hall of Fame conducted another fan poll (the same one which RUSH won), and Yes was included, they would be the #1 fan choice

Posted by Barry on Monday, 08.26.13 @ 10:10am


Thank you, Barry. I certainly would not oppose A Yes induction. Of course, Yes is definitely one of my favorite bands. However, how would Yes fare against Duran Duran and The Moody Blues?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 04:57am


"The Dead & the Airplane are in. The Doors are in, and so is Traffic & Floyd. The Hall obviously considers those bands to be 1st wave prog. The only other 1st wave prog band not in really is The Moody Blues which is a shame.

Bands like Yes, ELP, Genesis are excluded probably cause they're condsidered 2nd wave.

Bands like Kansas, ELO, Styx, Rush are 3rd wave & have 0 chance whatsoever." - Arrow Man

I'm not sure if they thought that way about the Dead, Airplane and The Doors, but yeah I think many people do consider Traffic and Floyd to be prog, and The Doors do have some stuff that could be considered prog, so I'm not sure where people were going with the "no prog" thing. Genesis is now in (though primarily because of the Collins years probably), and I think Yes will be in soon. King Crimson and ELP will continue to be snubbed, as will Procol Harum (first wave) and the other bands mentioned.
Posted by Sam on Thursday, 03.3.11 @ 04:54am

Thank you, Sam.

Of course, I do agree that it is a shame that The Moody Blues have not been inducted, also.

As far as Rush being considered 3rd wave and having no chance of being inducted whatsoever. Arrow Man was absolutely incorrect about that; wasn't he?

Will Yes be next?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 05:21am


Back in 1997- 1998, when I had started creating my website, my favorite "progressive rock" bands were: Rush, Renaissance, The Moody Blues, Yes, ELP, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Jethro Tull, The Alan Parson's Project and Asia.

Over the years since, I have begun to appreciate the music of the following groups: Genesis, Procol Harum, Gentle Giant, Kansas, Styx, Talking Heads and Duran Duran, as well.

Of course, when I had started creating my Yes page back in 1997, I was also mesmerized by the great album artwork of Roger Dean.


http://reocities.com/SunsetStrip/Lounge/1254/yesindex.html

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 06:18am


Yes' Chris Squire wants King Crimson and Chicago inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame, while Jon Anderson wants Mahavishnu Orchestra to be inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 09.21.13 @ 22:43pm


http://www.slate.com/blogs/weigel/2013/09/13/yes_may_re_unite_if_political_consultants_succeed_in_getting_them_in_the.html

Yes May Reunite if Political Consultants Succeed in Getting Them Into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 09.21.13 @ 22:50pm


Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Peter Banks (1968-1970: guitar)
03. Chris Squire (1968-Present: bass)
04. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
05. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
06. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
07. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
08. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
09. Patrick Moraz (1974-1976: keyboards, The Moody Blues)
10. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 10.15.13 @ 23:16pm


Only Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, Chris Squire, Bill Bruford, Alan White, Jon Anderson mentioned in the intro to the Rock Hall bio for Yes. That doesn't mean those will be the only inductees.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 10.16.13 @ 01:01am


Tony Kaye is not mentioned in the Rock Hall bio so far.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 10.16.13 @ 07:39am


Although I am very disappointed that The Moody Blues, Duran Duran and The Electric Light Orchestra are not on 2014's Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame nomination list, seeing Yes there is not necessarily a bad thing. As I had said before, Yes has been my co-favorite band musically for 32 years. Do they deserve to be inducted? absolutely.

Yes has left us with a legacy of great music. I have more recordings by Yes, than any other artist.

With the exception of "9012 Live" and "Live From Lyons," I have every single Yes studio album and live Yes recording. I also own most, with very few exceptions, of their
compilations and DVDs.



Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 10.16.13 @ 10:09am


Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees Who Will Vote For Yes

The Rolling Stones, The Who, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Rush, Heart, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Metallica, Alice Cooper, Genesis, The Stooges, The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, The Pretenders, The Police, Blondie, The Clash, Ramones, Van Halen, U2, R.E.M, Traffic, ZZ Top, AC/DC, Pink Floyd, Aerosmith, Queen, Lynyrd Skynyrd

Posted by Roy on Friday, 10.18.13 @ 10:50am


As far as the 2014 nominees are concerned, Yes is my favorite nominee. For the past 32 years, Yes has been my co-favorite album musically.

Let's talk about Yes, shall we? I have been an aficionado of most of their music for the past 32 years. Here are my ratings of their studio and live albums:

Let's look at their studio albums first, shall we?

Yes ***
Time And A Word ***

The Yes Album *****
Fragile *****
Close To The Edge *****

Tales From Topographic Oceans *****
Relayer ****
Going For The One *****
Tormato ***
Drama ****

90125 *****
Big Generator ***
Union **1/2
Talk *

Keys To Ascension *****
Keys To Ascension 2 *****
Keystudio *****
Open Your Eyes **
The Ladder ****

Magnification *****
Fly From Here ***1/2

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 08.7.13 @ 10:02am

Now, as far as the ratings on the Yes live recordings are concerned:

Yessongs *****

Yesshows **** 1/2

Union Live *** 1/2

House Of Yes: Live From The House Of Blues *****

Yes: Live At Montreaux **** 1/2

Yes Symphonic: *****

I do not own either "9012 Live," or "Live At Lyons," yet.







Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.20.13 @ 07:37am


I had meant to say that Yes is my co-favorite band musically. I like most of the elements involved in the way that Yes albums are put together. I am always interested in the new album artwork, especially if it is created by Roger Dean. Of course, the new compilation of Yes' studio albums is of great interest to me, also. I am hoping that the remastering provides new sonic revelations heretofore unseen.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.20.13 @ 13:34pm


The first time that I had attended a Yes concert was in October, 1999. The concert was held in an intimate venue known as Union Hall, in downtown Phoenix, Arizona. The whole experience had reminded me of being in the midst of a church service where the music did not suck. Their new keyboardist, Igor Khoroshev was phenomenal. I was so impressed that I would go on to see Yes two more times.

The final time that I had seen Yes was in 2002, during the Yes full circle tour. At that time, I had the opportunity to see "Classic Yes" with Rick Wakeman. I had seats in the center of the 7th row at Cricket Pavillion. They had performed 'Awaken,' my favorite Yes epic.

A few weeks later, I would see Rush (for the second time) during the Vapor Trails tour. My third and most recent Rush concert was during the Clockwork Angels' Tour. Next month, I will need to get the BluRay, DVD and cd of that concert.

I am hoping that Yes will release their recent concert tour on DVD and BluRay. I was not able to attend their most recent concert and their performance of "The Yes Album," "Going For The One" and "Close To The Edge," in their entirety, certainly does intrigue me.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 10.21.13 @ 09:44am


Yes' chances of being inducted just went up exponentially. Rush's induction will finally open the door for "progressive rock."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.3.13 @ 13:14pm


Yes, I had written that earlier this year; on my 51st birthday, nonetheless.

Other reviewers have appeared to agree with me.

As far as I am concerned, Yes' induction is essential. Yes has since it's beginnings been an innovative band, of course there may have arguably been a few missteps along the way: "Tormato," "Big Generator," "Union," "Talk" and "Open Your Eyes," but who can argue against the brilliance of "The Yes Album," "Fragile," "Close To The Edge," "Going For The One," "Keys To Ascension," "Keys To Ascension 2," "Magnification" and "Yes Symphonic?" Who else had the audacity to create something as masterful, yet controversial as the arguably magnificent, "Tales From Topographic Oceans?"

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 10.23.13 @ 06:28am


Now, I have recently purchased: "In The Present Live From Lyon." This means that "9012 Live" is the only Yes live album which I do not currently own.

As far as Yes is concerned, I have to reiterate that they are unquestionably my co- favorite musical group. Although i have more recordings by Yes overall, Rush is now my favorite band, but Yes is just slightly behind them.

For the most part, Yes' music is beautiful and transcends your normal four minute "pop songs." Yes' music is ethereal and the lyrics are surreal.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.25.13 @ 05:28am


I was very encouraged to see Yes finally receive an induction nomination. They are my top choice amongst the 2014 Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame nominees list.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.2.13 @ 05:38am


With the possible exceptions of "Talk" (the absolute nadir of Yes' output) and "Open Your Eyes," one can never have enough Yes. I have recently ordered the 1969-1987 studio albums box set; it maybe my final musical purchase this year.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.2.13 @ 11:52am


With the possible exceptions of "Talk" (the absolute nadir of Yes' output) and "Open Your Eyes," one can never have enough Yes. I have recently ordered the 1969-1987 studio albums box set; it may be my final musical purchase this year.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.2.13 @ 11:52am

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.2.13 @ 13:17pm


As far as the 2014 nominees are concerned, Yes is my favorite nominee. For the past 32 years, Yes has been my co-favorite album musically.

Let's talk about Yes, shall we? I have been an aficionado of most of their music for the past 32 years. Here are my ratings of their studio and live albums:

Let's look at their studio albums first, shall we?

Yes ***
Time And A Word ***

The Yes Album *****
Fragile *****
Close To The Edge *****

Tales From Topographic Oceans *****
Relayer ****
Going For The One *****
Tormato ***
Drama ****

90125 *****
Big Generator ***
Union **1/2
Talk *

Keys To Ascension *****
Keys To Ascension 2 *****
Keystudio *****
Open Your Eyes **
The Ladder ****

Magnification *****
Fly From Here ***1/2

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 08.7.13 @ 10:02am

Now, as far as the ratings on the Yes live recordings are concerned:

Yessongs *****

Yesshows **** 1/2

Union Live *** 1/2

House Of Yes: Live From The House Of Blues *****

Yes: Live At Montreaux **** 1/2

Yes Symphonic: *****

In The Present: Live From Lyon ***1/2



I do not own "9012 Live," yet.

I have recently purchased, "In The Present: Live From Lyon," however.

I have also ordered the 1969- 1987 Studio albums box set.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.3.13 @ 10:29am


I had decided to wear my "Tales From Topographic Oceans" tee shirt to work yesterday in support of Yes.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.5.13 @ 08:57am


Let's go back in time, shall we?


My list of 2013 inductees:

Donna Summer (posthumously)
Heart (two sisters who had dominated a band, whose great singles are still being played on the radio)
Rush (their long term snub is starting to reach critical mass, even Rolling Stone magazine readers are in favor of this. Rush was voted greatest prog rock of all time by their readers). They are ranked third in most consecutive gold and platinum albums behind The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.

Yes (IMHO, if you induct Rush, then you absolutely must induct Yes), but probably not necessarily in 2013.
Yes was instrumental in starting prog rock, plus 90125 was a
danceable hit album.

I think that The Moody Blues deserve a nod also, for
inventing the "progressive rock" genre, but inducting Rush should push the Moodies and Procol Harum, in within the next several years. Compared to the amount of time that they have waited, this will be relatively soon. Technically, Rush is not really heavy metal, and most of their songs are not that hard anyway.

Posted by Keith on Sunday, 06.10.12 @ 02:12am

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.9.13 @ 13:22pm


Before I get into the many reasons why I feel that Rush is the greatest rock band of all time, I would like to discuss one of their biggest influences: Yes.

Now that Rush's recent induction has finally opened that door for more progressive rock bands to be inducted, I think that the Rush fan base should throw their support behind Yes.

Given that Yes and Rush are roughly as old as each other, (both were formed in 1968) I think that acknowledging Yes' worthiness of being enshrined within the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame should be discussed. So let's do this; shall we discuss Yes' accomplishments in great detail?



Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.9.13 @ 23:12pm


"shall we discuss Yes' accomplishments in great detail?"

I'm watching my fingernails grow. I'll have to pass.

Posted by DarinRG on Saturday, 11.9.13 @ 23:31pm


*snicker*

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 11.10.13 @ 00:56am


When it comes to great "progressive rock" epics, Yes has a plethora of them:

"Yours Is No Disgrace," "Perpetual Change" and "Starship Trooper," from the YES ALBUM.

"Roundabout," "Heart Of The Sunrise" and "The South Side Of The Sky" from FRAGILE.

"Siberian Khatru," "And You And I" and "Close To The Edge" from CLOSE TO THE EDGE.

"The Revealing Science Of God," "The Remembering," "The Ancient" and "Ritual" from TALES FROM TOPOGRAPHIC OCEANS.

"The Gates Of Delirium" from RELAYER.

"Awaken" from GOING FOR THE ONE.

"Be The One" and "That, That Is" from KEYS TO ASCENSION.

"Mind Drive" from KEYS TO ASCENSION 2.


Yes also has several great songs from MAGNIFICATION.

And let's not forget, ANDERSON, BRUFORD, WAKEMAN & HOWE.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 11.13.13 @ 06:38am


I had somehow forgotten, "Homeworld" from THE LADDER and "In The Presence Of," from MAGNIFICATION.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 11.13.13 @ 08:43am


I will eventually get around to listing all of the great songs by Yes. Until then, I have to ask why isn't there a band called, No? If there had been, would they have also been a major progressive rock band, or would their music have been the antithesis of Yes?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.15.13 @ 03:49am


Well there's New Order if that counts. And they are quite different to Yes...

Posted by GFW on Friday, 11.15.13 @ 11:29am


Back in May, 1997 I had started creating my long archived website:


http://reocities.com/SunsetStrip/Lounge/1254/yesindex.html

This was one of the main pages which had led to my discussions about Yes and their albums.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.29.13 @ 12:11pm


I have been watching portions of "Symphonic Live" on BluRay for the past few days. In my honest opinion, either a string section or a symphony orchestra has a tendency to really enhance the music of any artist. Even with their instrumental prowess, Yes is not an exception to this rule.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 12.1.13 @ 13:36pm


Even though the bi-partisan effort to induct Yes had failed this year, I do not think that the Yes aficionados should give up their efforts. Rush's induction was certainly a game changer; unfortunately, many members of the Rush fan base had chosen to join with the KISS army, instead of supporting Yes. Those individuals feel that Rush fans should have endorsed KISS, because KISS had chosen Rush as their tour mates during the early days.

As I had stated before, I feel was this was for financial gain, not completely altruistic reasons. Once Rush had changed their style, they were pretty much left to fend for themselves. Even so, Rush had chosen to take a more artistically satisfying route. At that point, their management should have teamed them up with more progressive rock acts. Since they did not, Rush had to forge their own way in the world of prog rock, without the support of their kindred brethren.

If Rush had opened for Yes instead, both artists would have benefitted tremendously, financially and creatively. But hindsight is 20-20. Let's not give up yet, If the bi-partisan effort to induct Yes goes into full swing again and if Rush's fan base can be motivated to support Rush's prog rock brethren, we should see Yes get back on the ballot again. This time though, it will be imperative that Rush's fan base support Rush's fellow prog rock brethren, in lieu of bands who were financially tied to them.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 12.23.13 @ 02:09am


Even though the bi-partisan effort to induct Yes had failed this year, I do not think that the Yes aficionados should give up their efforts. Rush's induction was certainly a game changer; unfortunately, many members of the Rush fan base had chosen to join with the KISS army, instead of supporting Yes. Those individuals feel that Rush fans should have endorsed KISS, because KISS had chosen Rush as their tour mates during the early days.

As I had stated before, I feel was this was for financial gain, not completely altruistic reasons. Once Rush had changed their style, they were pretty much left to fend for themselves. Even so, Rush had chosen to take a more artistically satisfying route. At that point, their management should have teamed them up with more progressive rock acts. Since they did not, Rush had to forge their own way in the world of prog rock, without the support of their kindred brethren.

If Rush had opened for Yes instead, both artists would have benefitted tremendously, financially and creatively. But hindsight is 20-20. Let's not give up yet, If the bi-partisan effort to induct Yes goes into full swing again and if Rush's fan base can be motivated to support Rush's prog rock brethren, then we should see Yes get back on the ballot again. This time though, it will be imperative that Rush's fan base support Rush's fellow prog rock brethren, in lieu of bands who were financially tied to them.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 12.23.13 @ 02:09am

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 12.27.13 @ 03:30am


I had placed "Classic Yes" in my car's cd player yesterday. While on the way to work, I had chosen to listen to 'Heart Of The Sunrise' and 'Wonderous Stories.' It is still an astonishing thing to realize, just how well Yes' recordings hold up, after more than 4 decades, in the case of "Fragile" and nearly 37 years in the case of "Going For The One."


Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 01.22.14 @ 08:12am


There is no doubt Yes belongs. Should have been in 20 years ago. To understand was piece of crap the RRHOF is, they waited 2 years to induct the Beatles. They should have inducted the Beatles the first year with no one else.

Posted by Bruce on Tuesday, 02.4.14 @ 09:18am


"To understand was piece of crap the RRHOF is, they waited 2 years to induct the Beatles. They should have inducted the Beatles the first year with no one else. "--Bruce

You know, I know we have the saying "It takes all kinds..." and then I read absolutely and willfully ignorant dreck like this and invariably have to ask, "You sure about that?"

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 02.4.14 @ 16:44pm


yes is by far better musicians than kiss.yeah kiss sold a lot of albums and had the make up thing but as far as musicians they cannot compete
with yes.peter criss was a real musician but the rest of kiss forget it. yes definitely got screwed
and it sucks.the real kicker is that simmons and Stanley cannot put differences aside and play at the awards with original line up.thats sickening and a kick to the balls for the fans that made kiss who they are.gene,paul,peter and ace are kiss and they are who made kiss what they are.so thanks gene and paul for your selfish child bay bullshit yeah you guys deserve it ,yeah right!

Posted by tonester on Saturday, 03.29.14 @ 08:41am


Yes, I would also really like to see Yes inducted into the RRHOF in 2015, in addition to: The Moody Blues, Duran Duran, Sade, Carly Simon, The Doobie Brothers, Foreigner, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Deep Purple. Of course, I am fairly certain that Green Day will be inducted, as well.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.24.14 @ 19:20pm


The "Voices For Yes" campaign needs to be revived once again.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 08.9.14 @ 14:48pm


I have been informed that according to a very PROG magazine poll, readers have voted "Close To The Edge" as the greatest progressive rock album of all time.

Here is that list:

Appreciate there's already a thread on this, but thought it would be helpful to put the full list on the top page, for those that don't want to scroll through other posts.

Prog Magazine Top 100

1. Close To The Edge – Yes
2. In The Court of the Crimson King – King Crimson
3. Selling England By The Pound – Genesis
4. Dark Side of the Moon – Pink Floyd
5. Thick As A Brick – Jethro Tull
6. Foxtrot – Genesis
7. Wish You Were Here – Pink Floyd
8. The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway – Genesis
9. The Raven Who Refused To Sing – Steven Wilson
10. Fragile – Yes
11. Brain Salad Surgery – Emerson, Lake & Palmer
12. Red – King Crimson
13. Moving Pictures – Rush
14. Animals – Pink Floyd
15. 2112 – Rush
16. The Wall – Pink Floyd
17. Scenes From A Memory – Dream Theater
18. Fear of a Blank Planet – Porcupine Tree
19. Relayer – Yes
20. Misplaced Childhood – Marillion
21. A Trick of the Tail – Genesis
22. Tales from Topographic Oceans – Yes
23. Hemispheres – Rush
24. Pawn Hearts – Van Der Graaf Generator
25. Images and Words – Dream Theater
26. Going for the One – Yes
27. Deadwing – Porcupine Tree
28. Tarkus – Emerson, Lake & Palmer
29. Brave – Marillion
30. Larks Tongues In Aspic – King Crimson
31. The Snow Goose – Camel
32. The Yes Album – Yes
33. Lateralus – Tool
34. Bridge Across Forever – Transatlantic
35. In the Land of Pink and Grey – Caravan
36. Blackwater Park – Opeth
37. Meddle – Pink Floyd
38. English Electric – Big Big Train
39. The Whirlwind – Transatlantic
40. Script for a Jester’s Tear – Marillion
41. Nursery Cryme – Genesis
42. Trilogy – Emerson, Lake & Palmer
43. Aqualung – Jethro Tull
44. Wind and Wuthering – Genesis
45. Colours – Between The Buried and Me
46. Ghost Reveries – Opeth
47. Clutching at Straws – Marillion
48. The Incident – Porcupine Tree
49. A Passion Play – Jethro Tull
50. Grace for Drowning – Steven Wilson
51. Mirage – Camel
52. Marbles – Marillion
53. A Farewell to Kings – Rush
54. The Mountain – Haken
55. Journey to the Centre of the Earth – Rick Wakeman
56. Acquiring the Taste – Gentle Giant
57. Crack the Skye – Mastodon
58. Moonmadness – Camel
59. Weather Systems – Anathema
60. Tubular Bells – Mike Oldfield
61. De-loused in the Crematorium – The Mars Volta
62. Aenima – Tool
63. The Parallax II – Between The Buried and Me
64. Operation Mindcrime – Queensryche
65. Octopus – Gentle Giant
66. In Absentia – Porcupine Tree
67. Insurgentes – Steven Wilson
68. Rock Bottom – Robert Wyatt
69. Permanent Waves – Rush
70. Discipline – King Crimson
71. Atom Heart Mother – Pink Floyd
72. Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band – The Beatles
73. Godbluff – Van Der Graaf Generator
74. Hot Rats – Frank Zappa
75. Free Hand – Gentle Giant
76. Songs from the Wood – Jethro Tull
77. Crime of the Century – Supertramp
78. Still Life – Opeth
79. Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Emerson, Lake & Palmer
80. Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence – Dream Theater
81. Leftoverture – Kansas
82. Subterannea – IQ
83. Still Life – Van Der Graaf Generator
84. Remedy Lane – Pain of Salvation
85. UK – UK
86. Six – Mansun
87. OK Computer – Radiohead
88. Snow – Spock's Beard
89. Awake – Dream Theater
90. Afraid of Sunlight – Marillion
91. Damnation – Opeth
92. The Six Wives of Henry the Eighth – Rick Wakeman
93. Storm Corrosion – Storm Corrosion
94. War of the Worlds – Jeff Wayne
95. To Our Children’s Children’s Children – The Moody Blues
96. Lizard – King Crimson
97. Voyage of the Acolyte – Steve Hackett
98. Tago Mago – Can
99. Moving Waves – Focus
100. Drama - Yes

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 08.11.14 @ 07:37am


I am sorry, I had meant to say, according to a recent PROG magazine poll, readers had voted "Close To The Edge," as the greatest progressive rock album of all time. Of course, this had only accounted for studio albums; a combined list of studio and live albums might have had a different outcome. By the way, I still have difficulty understanding why "Selling England By The Pound," by Genesis is so beloved by progressive rock fans. Personally, I think that "Foxtrot," "Nursery Cryme," "A Trick Of The Tail," "Duke," "Genesis," "The Lam Lies Down On Broadway," "Second's Out," "Three Sides Live," "Abacab" and "Invisible Touch" are better albums.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 08.11.14 @ 07:52am


About Yes, Enigmaticus wrote:
   I am sorry, I had meant to say, according to a recent PROG magazine poll, readers had voted "Close To The Edge," as the greatest progressive rock album of all time. Of course, this had only accounted for studio albums; a combined list of studio and live albums might have had a different outcome. By the way, I still have difficulty understanding why "Selling England By The Pound," by Genesis is so beloved by progressive rock fans. Personally, I think that "Foxtrot," "Nursery Cryme," "A Trick Of The Tail," "Duke," "Genesis," "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway," "Second's Out," "Three Sides Live," "Abacab" and "Invisible Touch" are much better albums.


Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 08.11.14 @ 08:04am


Yes,

I really think that "Voices For Yes" should continue to lobby for the induction of Yes into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. What do you, think?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 09.1.14 @ 16:17pm


As I had said before, I was tremendously disappointed by the induction of KISS over Yes and Deep Purple this year.

Hopefully, Yes will be inducted next year, instead.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 09.11.14 @ 08:13am


Regarding the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame 2015 inductees, just say yes to Yes.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.21.14 @ 01:40am


I wonder if Yes would have been as popular, if their name had been Si, Oui, Ja, Dah, or Hai, instead?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.21.14 @ 01:43am


Same melody, different lyrics, Enig.

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 09.21.14 @ 02:33am


I am fairly certain that Yes will return to the ballot once again. The first Rolling Stone Record Guide (1979 edition) had given their recordings quite a few high ratings. Since my copy is still in storage, I am relying solely upon my memory to say that the reviewer had given two of their albums five stars: "The Yes Album" and "Close To The Edge."

In contrast, that same record guide had been merciless to Rush. But the newer 1983 edition, had given "2112," "Hemispheres," "Permanent Waves," "Moving Pictures" and "Exit... Stage Left" four stars. "A Farewell To Kings" was awarded three stars. Those reviews were written by John Swenson, co-editor of the book.

Therefore both Rush and Yes had been given a precedent for induction. Rush has been in since 2013. Yes, will most likely be inducted next year.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 09.22.14 @ 09:31am


Of course, I am very excited about this release:

http://rockwrite.blogspot.com/2014/07/yes-songs-from-tsongas-35th-anniversary.html

This will probably be my next Yes purchase.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 09.25.14 @ 09:36am


Apparently, "The Voices For Yes" Committee needs to be revived once again. Yes is another hugely glaring omission from the Rock Hall, along with their brothers: The Moody Blues, Procol Harum, King Crimson and Jethro Tull.

At least their other brother, Rush, has called for their inductions. Meanwhile their sisters Roxy Music and Duran Duran are still waiting in the lobby. ;-)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.11.14 @ 05:50am


Yes will never get in because the RRHOF is really a Pop Hall of Fame. Weird Al will get in before Yes, Yes is simply not mainstream enough for a Pop Hall of Fame. Blondie? Hall and Oats? Really?

Getting snubbed is nothing new. Steve Howe regularly get's left off most Top Guitarist lists while he is arguably one of the top 5 of all-time when it comes to versatility and flat out talent.

Another issue for Yes is the 18 member roll call. Who would go?
Jon Davison
Jon Anderson
Trevor Horn
Benoit David
Oliver Wakeman
Patrick Moraz
Tony Kay
Geoff Downes
Igor Korochev
Rick Wakeman
Pete Banks
Billy Sherwood
Steve Howe
Trevor Rabin
Steve Howe
Bill Bruford
Alan White
Chris Squire

Posted by Lance on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 08:28am


Lance, I disagree that Yes will not get in. They will. But you do pose an interesting question as to which members should/would be inducted.

No brainers:

Jon Anderson
Chris Squire
Steve Howe
Rick Wakeman
Tony Kaye
Bill Bruford
Alan White

Strong argument:

Trevor Rabin


I feel that Rabin absolutely should go in, I personally love his era and he was the driving force for a decade. But there are many who do not like the Rabin era.

I would put in those eight listed above.

I usually look at it this way. Would the band be getting in to the Hall of Fame if the work done while Person X was in the band had never happened? If the answer is "no," then that person deserves induction.

With Yes, it is 'The Yes Album' through the late 70's somewhere, and the early to mid-80's. While there are fans of other periods, those periods don't really matter that much.

Posted by Dezmond on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 13:27pm


Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Peter Banks (1968-1970: guitar)
03. Chris Squire (1968-Present: bass)
04. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
05. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
06. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
07. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
08. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
09. Patrick Moraz (1974-1976: keyboards, The Moody Blues)
10. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

THOSE ARE THE INDUCTEES

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 15:08pm


Roy, I wouldn't mind seeing all those people go in, but I have strong doubts that either Peter Banks or Patrick Moraz. Moraz only played on one studio album, 'Relayer,' and that record is generally not put in their all time essentials, although I personally think 'Relayer' is awesome. Banks was gone and Steve Howe in by the time they started to record their really important records.

As I stated above, I could see the Hall making what I would consider to be a mistake and also leave out Trevor Rabin. I'm sure that would make Howe happy, though.

Posted by Dezmond on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 17:20pm


And Roy, to be accurate, you need to add "vocals" to Trevor Rabin, as he sang lead vocals on several songs on each of the Yes records during the 80's. Also, you need to bave "backing vocals" with Squire, as his harmony singing is present and prominant throughout the Yes canon.

Posted by Dezmond on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 17:24pm


Peter Banks, Tony Kaye, Patrick Moraz and Trevor Rabin were not mentioned in the nominee bio/intro to Yes on the Rock Hall website last year. I don't know if we should be reading into it too much that Tony Kaye wasn't mentioned yet!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 10.30.14 @ 18:12pm


I fully expect Yes to return to the nomination ballot in October, 2015 along with The Moody Blues, Duran Duran, Sade, Doobie Brothers, etc. This time however, I think that there will be a greater chance for their induction.

As far as who will be inducted from Yes is concerned, that is certainly anybody's guess. However, I am inclined to believe that these individuals are most likely:

Jon Anderson
Chris Squire
Steve Howe
Bill Bruford
Rick Wakeman
Alan White
Trevor Rabin
Tony Kaye
Peter Banks (posthumously)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.31.14 @ 09:49am


I am still extremely disappointed that Yes has not yet returned to the nomination ballot.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.19.15 @ 02:07am


Yes deserves immediate induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame, along with these other artists:

Duran Duran
The Moody Blues
Electric Light Orchestra
Sade
Carly Simon
Doobie Brothers
Foreigner
Twisted Sister
Deep Purple

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.2.15 @ 11:25am


It will be a few years before YES gets inducted. 2016 will be Deep Purple finally and Willie Nelson for his long music career spanning 60 years. Next year some heavy hitters Pearl Jam headlining. I think YES gets in 2017 nominating year. 2018 Induction Ceremony. That just seems the way it shakes out. KING

Posted by KING on Friday, 05.22.15 @ 23:29pm


It's hard to know for certain, but I expect Yes to return to the nomination ballot again later this year. I was somewhat surprised that Yes was nominated but not inducted back in 2014. However, three "progressive rock/art rock" acts were inducted back in 1996: Pink Floyd, Jefferson Airplane and The Velvet Underground. Since then, arguably only 6 additional acts which fit into the art rock/progressive rock categories have been inducted: Queen in 2001, Talking Heads in 2002, Traffic in 2004, Genesis in 2010, Rush in 2013 and Peter Gabriel, as a solo artist in 2014.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.23.15 @ 03:42am


When Rush was inducted, back in 2013, they were very supportive of 5 additional artist's inductions: Yes, Deep Purple, The Moody Blues, King Crimson and Procol Harum.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.23.15 @ 04:18am


Unfortunately, I have found out through the Yes world website that Chris Squire, bassist extraordinaire and co-founder of Yes will be undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of Acute Erythroid Leukemia, a rare form of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. This is very serious folks. My concerns and thoughts go out to Chris and his family. Chris, Get well soon!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.30.15 @ 13:38pm


Yes has created some of the most amazing music over the past 46 years. Beginning with their debut album, "Yes," Yes had introduced a very different musical style into the rock canon. Although their predecessors, The Moody Blues and Procol Harum had co-founded the "progressive rock" genre prior to Yes' formation, Yes had continued to evolve as a band, releasing some of their most brilliant work during the 1970's. Albums such as "The Yes Album," "Fragile" and "Close To The Edge" had also been critically lauded. "The Yes Album" had featured such timeless progressive rock gems as 'Yours Is No Disgrace,' 'Starship Trooper' and 'Your Move/All Good People.' "Fragile" had featured the classic rock radio staple, 'Roundabout,' in addition to 'Long Distance Runaround,' 'Heart Of The Sunrise' and the chillingly brilliant 'South Side Of The Sky.' "Close To The Edge" had upped the ante, with the brilliant 'Siberian Khatru,' the sublime 'And You And I' and the extraordinary epic, 'Close To The Edge.' "Close To The Edge" has been lauded by many as quite possibly, "progressive Rock's definitive masterwork."

Their creative output did not stop there, "Going
For The One," with the brilliant epic, 'Awaken' and the sublime, 'Turn Of The Century' attest to this fact.


Although not a critically revered album, "Tales From Topographic Oceans" is also a masterpiece, featuring only 4 side long songs, the greatest of which are: 'The Revealing Science Of God' and 'Ritual.' "Tales" is perhaps a bit too far
ahead of it's time, in order to be fully appreciated. Of course, I also enjoy the sublime 'The Remembering' and the transformative, 'The Ancient.'

'The Gates Of Delirium' from "Relayer" is another epic work.

In the 1980's Yes was not afraid to change their style with the times and release "90125" with it's hit single, 'Owner Of A Lonely Heart.'

In the mid 1990's, Yes released the brilliant "Keys To Ascension" albums, which had showed that could Yes not only perform their previous masterworks in a live setting, but also release creative material in another decade. They had also released "The Ladder."

In the early 21st century, Yes had released another masterpiece, "Magnification" and had the audacity to tour with a symphony orchestra.

Yes has also been an influence on many of those previous inductees.

For these many reasons, in addition to those previously mentioned, Yes should receive their long overdue induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.30.15 @ 14:30pm


Actually, I think that Yes has a very good possibility of returning as a nominee and as a 2016 RRHOF inductee:

Who else will join them?

In my honest opinion, 2016 will finally be the "Great Year Of Prog," with the following possible inductees:

Duran Duran
Electric Light Orchestra
The Moody Blues
Sade
Carly Simon
The Doobie Brothers
Foreigner

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 05.30.15 @ 15:44pm


RIP Chris Squire

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 12:23pm


http://ultimateclassicrock.com/chris-squire-dies-yes/

Yes Co-Founder Chris Squire Dies

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 12:24pm


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/chris-squire-yes-bassist-and-co-founder-dead-at-67-20150628

Chris Squire, Yes Bassist and Co-Founder, Dead at 67

Bassist was only member of legendary prog rock group to appear on every album

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 12:25pm


Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Peter Banks (1968-1970: guitar)
03. Chris Squire (1968-2015: bass)
04. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
05. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
06. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
07. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
08. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
09. Patrick Moraz (1974-1976: keyboards, The Moody Blues)
10. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 12:28pm


My most sincere condolences to Chris Squire's family on his untimely passing. Chris was a genuine inspiration to many musicians, especially bassists.

Rather ironically, I had decided to watch "Yes Symphonic Live" on BluRay yesterday. As I have said many times before, "Yes has been my co-favorite band musically for over 34 years.

I was hoping to see Yes inducted back in 2014, but now it looks like Yes will receive a nomination and possible induction in 2016, too late for Chris and Peter, but not too late for Jon, Bill, Steve, Alan, Trevor, Rick and Geoff. It is quite a shame that Ed Sciacky will not be there as well. Hopefully Mike Tiano will be able to attend. ;-(

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 14:28pm


My most sincere condolences to Chris Squire's family on his untimely passing. Chris was a genuine inspiration to many musicians, especially bassists.

Rather ironically, I had decided to watch "Yes Symphonic Live" on BluRay yesterday. As I have said many times before, "Yes has been my co-favorite band musically for over 34 years."

I was hoping to see Yes inducted back in 2014, but now it looks like Yes will receive a nomination and possible induction in 2016, too late for Chris and Peter, but not too late for Jon, Bill, Steve, Alan, Trevor, Rick and Geoff. It is quite a shame that Ed Sciacky will not be there as well. Hopefully Mike Tiano will be able to attend. ;-(

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 14:35pm


Chris Squire died on the 13th anniversary of the death of another legendary bassist, John Entwistle

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 17:31pm


Well, we know who the death fairy is gonna visit and get inducted this year.

RIP Chris Squire

Posted by Philip on Sunday, 06.28.15 @ 19:31pm


With the passing of Chris Squire as well as Yes' overall contribution to rock & roll as well as all genres, I would hope the Foundation will seriously lobby for Yes' induction for the Class of 2016. Yes' contributions are undeniable. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Respectfully submitted

John J. Callahan
Granite Bay, CA

Posted by John J. Callahan on Wednesday, 07.1.15 @ 18:40pm


I could not agree more, John. I have been supporting Yes' induction actively for more than 3 consecutive years!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 07.3.15 @ 13:57pm


Yes, along with Rush has been my co-favorite band musically for 34 consecutive years. My introduction to the music of Yes came during the summer of 1981. I was first introduced to their album "Fragile," via a song named 'Roundabout.' Since that time, I have made it a point to collect most of Yes' discography. I have more recordings by Yes than any other artist.

I had started to watch the "Yes: Songs From Tsongas" BluRay during this past weekend.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 07.21.15 @ 05:40am


Nearly 18 years ago, I had started to create my Yes page for my now long-archived website. In addition to Yes' remarkable musical legacy, I also happen to appreciate Roger Dean's illustrations for most of Yes' albums. I also like Roger Dean's logos for Yes and Asia.

I also enjoy Roger's superlative artwork on "Asia" and "Alpha," especially "Alpha."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 07.23.15 @ 05:37am


Of the seven major progressive rock bands, only four remain active (The Moody Blues, King Crimson, Yes and Rush). But let's face basic facts, when these remaining artists have finally called it a day, who will succeed them and carry on with their legacy? Echolyn? Marillion? Muse? Or will the Zac Brown Band pick up the mantle? Before Chris Squire had passed away, he told Alan White to carry on. It is time for Yes and The Moody Blues to receive induction into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame, before we have to read about any more posthumous inductions. For nearly 47 years, Yes has left us with a remarkable legacy. Induct Yes into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame in 2016.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 08.9.15 @ 06:04am


I was six years old when the original version of Yes had formed. I was 7 years old when Yes had released their debut album. I was 9 years old when Yes had released "The Yes Album." I was 10 years old when Yes had released "Fragile" and "Close To The Edge." I was 11 years old when Yes had released "Yessongs" and "Tales From Topographic Oceans." I was 19 years old when I was first introduced to the music of Yes. I was 37 years old when I had attended my first Yes concert; it was during "The Ladder" tour. I was 38 years old when I had seen my second Yes concert. I was 39 years old when Yes had released "Magnification." I was 40 years old when I had attended my third Yes concert.

For the past 34 years, Yes has been my co-favorite band musically, along with Rush. I was 51 years old when Rush was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. I was also 51 years old when Yes was first nominated for induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. Hopefully, I will be 54 years old when Yes is finally inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 08.16.15 @ 04:35am


Yes has many essential albums in my opinion. Yes, regardless of their lineup has put together great pieces of music for more than 4 decades. Here are my essential Yes recordings (in chronological order):

01. The Yes Album
02. Fragile
03. Close To The Edge
04. Yessongs
05. Tales From Topographic Oceans
06. Going For The One
07. 90125
08. Anderson Bruford Wakeman & Howe
09. Keys To Ascension
10. Keys To Ascension 2
11. Live From The House Of Blues
12. Magnification
13. Symphonic Live
14. Keystudio

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 08.16.15 @ 16:50pm


My first live Yes concert was in October, 1999. In other words, I had waited 18 years from the time that I had been first introduced to Yes until the time when I had attended my first Yes concert. Yes did not disappoint me, either. The Yes concert was spectacular, plus their new keyboardist, at the time, Igor Khoroshev was quite remarkable.

I have seen Yes three times live in concert; it was quite unfortunate that the "Magnification" tour did not stop in Arizona, otherwise I would have seen Yes live in concert 4 times. "Magnification," in my honest opinion, is Yes's last great studio album. I had thoroughly enjoyed watching the "Yes: Symphonic Live" tour on BluRay. I was somewhat disappointed that they did not play the song, 'We Agree' however.

I think that 'We Agree' is definitely one of Yes's finest efforts. I have been listening to "Magnification" quite a few times, recently. Yesterday, I had attended to 'In The Presence Of' while on the way to work.

Since I was mired in one hellacious traffic jam yesterday afternoon while on the way to dinner, I had opted to listen to "Clockwork Angels Tour" by Rush, instead. I have noted many similarities between the music of Rush and the music of Yes and The Moody Blues, over the years, although Rush has not yet performed their songs with the support of a full symphony orchestra. Hopefully, some day soon that will change.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 08.20.15 @ 06:24am


About Yes, Enigmaticus wrote:
   My first live Yes concert was in October, 1999. In other words, I had waited 18 years from the time that I had been first introduced to Yes until the time when I had attended my first Yes concert. Yes did not disappoint me, either. The Yes concert was spectacular, plus their new keyboardist, at the time, Igor Khoroshev was quite remarkable.

I have seen Yes three times live in concert; it was quite unfortunate that the "Magnification" tour did not stop in Arizona, otherwise I would have seen Yes live in concert 4 times. "Magnification," in my honest opinion, is Yes's last great studio album. I had thoroughly enjoyed watching the "Yes: Symphonic Live" tour on BluRay. I was somewhat disappointed that they did not play the song, 'We Agree' however.

I think that 'We Agree' is definitely one of Yes's finest efforts. I have been listening to "Magnification" quite a few times, recently. Yesterday, I had intently listened to 'In The Presence Of' while on the way to work.


Since I was mired in one hellacious traffic jam yesterday afternoon while on the way to dinner, I had opted to listen to "Clockwork Angels Tour" by Rush, instead. I have noted many similarities between the music of Rush and the music of Yes and The Moody Blues, over the years, although Rush has not yet performed their songs with the support of a full symphony orchestra. Hopefully, some day soon that will change.
Thursday, 08.20.15 @ 06:24am
Leave your own comment about Yes here.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 08.20.15 @ 07:03am


Yes has been quite active lately. The new issue of PROG magazine will undoubtedly discuss the late Chris Squire's influence on "progressive rock."

For those of you who are not aficionados of "progressive rock," you will never quite understand why the new music of artists such as Yes, Rush and King Crimson excites us. You may also never quite understand why we also like such groups as diverse as: Talking Heads, Duran Duran, The Police and U2. You may also never quite understand why we might place Sade in high regard, alongside artists like Supertramp, E.L.O., Asia, Styx, Roxy Music, Alan Parsons Project, Pink Floyd and Kansas. You may never understand why we revere The Moody Blues, Jefferson Airplane, Procol Harum and Traffic. Those connections will never make any sense to you, but they do to us and there are a lot of us.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 09.6.15 @ 16:38pm


You've got to be F-ing kidding. YES should have been in YEARS ago, along with Journey, Moody Blues, Steve Miller, Jethro Tull, Todd Rungren, ELO, ELP, etc. etc.
Instead we have all these goofballs who climbed on the back of some of the great artists. WTF with the RAP CRAP??? It's the ROCK Hall of Fame, not the "I can't sing or carry a melody, therefore I just scream and talk big-tough gangster talk and MF this and back that A$$ up" garbage. Start your own "RAP CRAP" Hall of SHAME for Christ sake.
No one under the age of 50 should be allowed to vote for ROCK HALL OF FAME, and we'd get this straightened out. It is unforgivable. How about we recall some "inducted" groups like Run DMC, Nirvana, Green Day, Beastie Boys, Blondie, Public Enemy, Red Hot Peppers, etc. Come on, these guys all climbed on the backs of some really timeless rock groups. No one will be listening to this crap 30 years from now. Maybe/someday for some of these guys just for tweaking the sound of the rock 'forefathers', but for now, get em the hell out of there!

Posted by DANN-O on Thursday, 10.8.15 @ 12:37pm


Lol, Journey, Jethro Tull, ELP, etc over Run DMC, Nirvana, Green Day, Beastie Boys, Blondie, Public Enemy, and Red Hot Peppers. That's a good one. You have a great sense of humor DANN-O. Do you stand up?

Posted by Gassman on Thursday, 10.8.15 @ 13:13pm


*Do you do stand up?

Posted by Gassman on Thursday, 10.8.15 @ 13:15pm


Whether he realizes it or not, DANN-O is actually making a compelling case for keeping anyone ~over~ 50 from voting on this.

Posted by AlexVoltaire on Thursday, 10.8.15 @ 13:53pm


Thank you Mike Tiano for your support of Yes for many decades. "Yes world" is a great site, as was "Notes From The Edge." I have been an aficionado of Yes' music for over 34 years; Yes is second on my list of favorite bands, only Rush is above them. Yes was a seminal influence upon the music of Rush. Geddy Lee was hugely influenced by the late Chris Squire. Alex Lifeson was influenced by Steve Howe. Neil Peart was influenced by Bill Bruford.

Some individuals may argue that Yes should have been inducted years ago and I would definitely agree with them. In my honest opinion, only The Moody Blues have been a greater snub.

I will not say that every Yes studio album was a masterpiece, but most of them have been great. Yes has the distinction of having had many of the greatest musicians in their band. Yes has not been afraid to experiment with new musical directions either and very little of their work sounds dated. I have more recordings by Yes than by any other artist. With the possible exception of "9012 Live," and their most recent concert release and possibly a few compilations, I own most of Yes' discography.

I have written quite extensively about Rush, but I have yet to fully elucidate my opinions about Yes' work.

Let's talk about Yes, shall we? I have been an aficionado of most of their music for the past 32 years. Here are my ratings of their studio and live albums:

Let's look at their studio albums first, shall we?

Yes ***
Time And A Word ***

The Yes Album *****
Fragile *****
Close To The Edge *****

Tales From Topographic Oceans *****
Relayer ****
Going For The One *****
Tormato ***
Drama ****

90125 *****
Big Generator ***
Union **1/2
Talk *

Keys To Ascension *****
Keys To Ascension 2 *****
Keystudio *****
Open Your Eyes **
The Ladder ****

Magnification *****
Fly From Here ***1/2
Heaven & Earth ***

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.11.15 @ 11:51am


Yes has been quite active lately. The new issue of PROG magazine will undoubtedly discuss the late Chris Squire's influence on "progressive rock."

For those of you who are not aficionados of "progressive rock," you will never quite understand why the new music of artists such as Yes, Rush and King Crimson excites us. You may also never quite understand why we also like such groups as diverse as: Talking Heads, Duran Duran, The Police and U2. You may also never quite understand why we might place Sade in high regard, alongside artists like Supertramp, E.L.O., Asia, Styx, Roxy Music, Alan Parsons Project, Pink Floyd and Kansas. You may never understand why we revere The Moody Blues, Jefferson Airplane, Procol Harum and Traffic. You may never understand why many of us also like some of the music of artists, such as: Chicago, Blue Oyster Cult and even Deep Purple. Those connections will never make any sense to you, but they do to us and there are certainly a lot of us, which I think that you are now finally becoming aware of.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.11.15 @ 12:45pm


Yes has created some of the most amazing music over the past 46 years. Beginning with their debut album, "Yes," Yes had introduced a very different musical style into the rock canon. Although their predecessors, The Moody Blues and Procol Harum had co-founded the "progressive rock" genre prior to Yes' formation, Yes had continued to evolve as a band, releasing some of their most brilliant work during the 1970's. Albums such as "The Yes Album," "Fragile" and "Close To The Edge" had also been critically lauded. "The Yes Album" had featured such timeless progressive rock gems as 'Yours Is No Disgrace,' 'Starship Trooper' and 'Your Move/All Good People.' "Fragile" had featured the classic rock radio staple, 'Roundabout,' in addition to 'Long Distance Runaround,' 'Heart Of The Sunrise' and the chillingly brilliant 'South Side Of The Sky.' "Close To The Edge" had upped the ante, with the brilliant 'Siberian Khatru,' the sublime 'And You And I' and the extraordinary epic, 'Close To The Edge.' "Close To The Edge" has been lauded by many as quite possibly, "progressive Rock's definitive masterwork."

Their creative output did not stop there, "Going
For The One," with the brilliant epic, 'Awaken' and the sublime, 'Turn Of The Century' attest to this fact.


Although not a critically revered album, "Tales From Topographic Oceans" is also a masterpiece, featuring only 4 side long songs, the greatest of which are: 'The Revealing Science Of God' and 'Ritual.' "Tales" is perhaps a bit too far
ahead of it's time, in order to be fully appreciated. Of course, I also enjoy the sublime 'The Remembering' and the transformative, 'The Ancient.'

'The Gates Of Delirium' from "Relayer" is another epic work.

In the 1980's Yes was not afraid to change their style with the times and release "90125" with it's hit single, 'Owner Of A Lonely Heart.'

In the mid 1990's, Yes released the brilliant "Keys To Ascension" albums, which had showed that could Yes not only perform their previous masterworks in a live setting, but also release creative material in another decade. They had also released "The Ladder."

In the early 21st century, Yes had released another masterpiece, "Magnification" and had the audacity to tour with a symphony orchestra.

Yes has also been an influence on many of those previous inductees.

For these many reasons, in addition to those previously mentioned, Yes should receive their long overdue induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Let's get them inducted in 2016!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.11.15 @ 12:57pm


As an individual who is in his mid 50's, I will admit that I prefer "progressive rock" and "art rock" over all other rock genres. After those, I prefer Modern, Romantic, Classical and Baroque and sometimes Renaissance era music. If a rock band utilizes shifting and odd time signatures, musical and lyrical complexity and symphonic accompaniment, I am immediately interested in their output. This also means that, for the most part, with the possible exceptions of Motion Picture Soundtracks and maybe The Beach Boys and The Beatles, I do not generally listen to popular music made between 1950 and 1966.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.11.15 @ 22:37pm


I also like quite a bit of jazz, more specifically "smooth jazz," new age and jazz fusion. I also like some of the big band era music.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.11.15 @ 22:50pm


Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Peter Banks (1968-1970: guitar)
03. Chris Squire (1968-2015: bass)
04. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
05. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
06. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
07. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
08. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
09. Patrick Moraz (1974-1976: keyboards, The Moody Blues)
10. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.12.15 @ 09:47am


As far as this list of nominees is concerned, Yes is my favorite choice among the 2016 Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame nominees list. Although, I have only been familiar with Yes' music for a mere 34 years, Yes' music has left a long and lasting
effect upon my musical tastes.

I think that the induction of Yes will potentially lead to the nomination of The Moody Blues and their possible induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2017.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 11.4.15 @ 21:34pm


Yes, the weakest candidate on this list, are you kidding me? On some things, Dave Marsh is definitely way out in left field. On other matters, he has hit the nail on the head. One has to wonder, if he doesn't like Yes, then he must have absolutely despised Rush.

Maybe, just maybe, Dave Marsh was the individual who had kept Rush out of the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame for nearly 15 years. The fact that he is endorsing Deep Purple is good and the fact that he had mentioned Roxy Music and Procol Harum is a plus.

I do not understand any circumstances whatsoever, nor support his opinion about N.W.A. however. As far as I am concerned, misogynists and child molesters are of the same ilk.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.8.15 @ 11:15am


Dave Marsh's opinions about Yes and Chicago are also completely out of left field. On this list, I find no two more deserving candidates. Deep Purple is third.

As I have stated previously, any band, or artist who has influenced the members of Rush, deserves immediate induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame, period!

Yes was a huge influence upon Rush, as was King Crimson, The Moody Blues, Jethro Tull, etc.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.8.15 @ 11:38am


A colleague of mine at work today had accused me of being a "prog snob," Yes, of course, I am guilty as charged. However, I personally happen to prefer the word, "snogue."

Of course, he happens to be an AC/DC enthusiast. Need I say more?

However, I did take exception to the comment that Yes had almost killed "art rock."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.17.15 @ 23:11pm


As I had stated before, "Yes is my co-favorite band musically." I have more recordings by Yes than by any other artist. So, Yes is technically also my favorite band. So why do I rank Yes second only to Rush? Because of Yes' lyrics and the fact that not everything that Yes has done is spectacular also. I am not afraid to criticize "Talk," an album which should never have been released under the Yes moniker. I am also not a great fan of "Tomato," "Big Generator," "Union," nor "Open Your Eyes."

On the other hand, I am an avid supporter of the following Yes studio recordings:

"Keys To Ascension 1 & 2"
"Tales From Topographic Oceans"
"Magnification"
"Close To The Edge"
"Keystudio"
"Going For The One"
"Fragile"
"The Yes Album"
"90125"
"The Ladder"

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 11.18.15 @ 09:42am


That is "Tormato," not "Tomato."

I also appreciate a great deal of Yes' live recordings:

"Keys To Ascension 1"
"Keys To Ascension 2"
"Symphonic Live"
"Yessongs"
"Live At The House Of Blues"
"Live At Tsongas"
"Live At Montreux"

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 11.18.15 @ 09:51am


Since, I have already ranked every Rush song from first to last, my challenge over the next few months will be to rank Yes's songs from best to worst. This will take a great deal of thought. In the interim period, here is a preliminary list:

01. Awaken (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
02. Give Love Each Day (Magnification, 2001)
03. The Revealing Science Of God (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
04. Close To The Edge (Symphonic Live, 2009)
05. Roundabout (Fragile, 1972)
06. And You And I (Close To The Edge, 1972)
07. Turn Of The Century (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
08. The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
09. Heart Of The Sunrise (Fragile, 1972)
10. Starship Trooper (Yessongs, 1973)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.20.15 @ 08:47am


I need to amend that previous list, slightly"

01. Awaken (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
02. We Agree (Magnification, 2001)
03. Mind Drive (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
04. Magnification (Symphonic Live, 2009)
05. Close To The Edge (Symphonic Live, 2009)
06. The Revealing Science Of God (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
07. Give Love Each Day (Magnification, 2001)
08. In The Presence Of (Symphonic Live, 2009)
09. Roundabout (Fragile, 1971)
10. Starship Trooper (The Yes Album, 1971)
11. And You And I (Symphonic Live, 2009)
12. South Side Of The Sky (Fragile, 1971)
13. Spirit Of Survival (Magnification, 2001)
14. Siberian Khatru (Close To The Edge, 1972)
15. The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
16. Heart Of The Sunrise (Fragile, 1971)
17. Yours Is No Disgrace (The Yes Album, 1971)
18. Turn Of The Century (Going For The One, 1977)
19. Perpetual Change (The Yes Album, 1971)
20. Don't Kill The Whale (Tomato, 1978)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.20.15 @ 09:19am


I need to amend that previous list, slightly"

01. Awaken (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
02. We Agree (Magnification, 2001)
03. Mind Drive (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
04. Magnification (Symphonic Live, 2009)
05. Close To The Edge (Symphonic Live, 2009)
06. The Revealing Science Of God (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
07. Give Love Each Day (Magnification, 2001)
08. In The Presence Of (Symphonic Live, 2009)
09. Roundabout (Fragile, 1971)
10. Starship Trooper (The Yes Album, 1971)
11. And You And I (Symphonic Live, 2009)
12. South Side Of The Sky (Fragile, 1971)
13. Spirit Of Survival (Magnification, 2001)
14. Siberian Khatru (Close To The Edge, 1972)
15. The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
16. Heart Of The Sunrise (Fragile, 1971)
17. Yours Is No Disgrace (The Yes Album, 1971)
18. Turn Of The Century (Going For The One, 1977)
19. Perpetual Change (The Yes Album, 1971)
20. Don't Kill The Whale (Tormato, 1978)
21. The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus) (Yessongs, 1973)
22. Ritual (Symphonic Live, 2009)
23. Can You Imagine (Magnification, 2001)
24. I've Seen All Good People (Symphonic Live, 2009)
25. Owner Of A Lonely Heart (90125, 1983)
26. Machine Messiah (Drama, 1980)
27. Be The One (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
28. Onward (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
29. Wonderous Stories (Going For The One, 1977)
30. Homeworld (The Ladder, 1999)
31. The Ancient (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
32. Long Distance Runaround (Fragile, 1972)
33. Parallels (Going For The One, 1977)
34. To Be Over (Relayer, 1974)
35. The Gates Of Delirium (Symphonic Live, 2009)
36. Mood For A Day (Fragile, 1972)
37. Children Of Light (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
38. Foot Prints (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
39. Don't Go (Symphonic Live, 2009)
40. Survival (Yes, 1969)
41. Then (Time And A Word, 1970)
42. Going For The One (Going For The One, 1977)
43. Astral Traveller (Time And A Word, 1970)
44. Shoot High Aim Low (Big Generator, 1987)
45. Leave It (90125, 1983)
46. It Can Happen (90125, 1983)
47. Love Will Find A Way (Big Generator, 1987)
48. Lift Me Up (Union, 1991)
49. Changes (90125, 1983)
50. That That Is (Keys To Ascension, 1996)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.21.15 @ 05:18am


2016 will also be a very significant year for Yes also, because in addition to their pending induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame by the members of Rush, there will also be several significant album release anniversaries. 2016 will mark the 45th anniversary of the release of "The Yes Album" and "Fragile," the 20th anniversary of the release of "Keys To Ascension" and the 15th anniversary of the release of "Magnification."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 12.14.15 @ 09:19am


My apologies to the Yes fanbase and to Mike Tiano, in particular for Yes not being inducted. It is almost completely incomprehensible how one the greatest progressive rock bands of all time is still sitting outside of the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. As I have stated previously, "Yes is my co-favorite band musically, alongside Rush."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 12.17.15 @ 09:05am


ENIG & YES FANS.
That was a tough 2016 Induction List for those who support YES. The good news is the many members of Chicago & Deep Purple made induction. They will possibly throw votes YES direction next induction cycle. Could make the difference for YES.

2016-2017 should be a loaded ballot. Pearl Jam will be a definite and possibly Bon Jovi if they are nominated. There should be competition for the Prog spot. I think Moody Blues, Procol Harum, or YES could be the one selected. I have noticed a strong drum beat for Moody Blues the last year. My guess Moody Blues will be selected and inducted in 2017. Moody Blues reminds me of Hall & Oates, Rush,Steve Miller and Chicago. Recent inductees who had strong longevity and hits over decades and rewarded for their music excellence in its totality.

YES needs the voters this next cycle for induction. With 5 maximum to select, I think YES should be one chosen on an artist's ballot. KING

Posted by KING on Friday, 12.18.15 @ 18:06pm


KING,

Thank you. I do think that their third nomination should finally get Yes inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. Perhaps the Rock Hall is waiting for the 45th anniversary of the release of "Close To The Edge" and the 50th anniversary of the birth of "progressive rock," to induct them. However, it is somewhat disheartening that Yes was not inducted in 2016. I am sure that many aficionados of progressive rock were aghast.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 12.24.15 @ 10:40am


I still find it completely incomprehensible that Yes has not yet been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Honestly, this is starting to become ridiculous; who is voting against Yes and why are they doing so?

My apologies to the Yes fanbase and to Mike Tiano, in particular for Yes not being inducted. It is almost completely incomprehensible how one of the greatest progressive rock bands of all time is still sitting outside of the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. As I have stated previously, "Yes is my co-favorite band musically, alongside Rush."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 12.26.15 @ 23:39pm


Enigmaticus: I think it comes back to the idea of giving ballots to artists who were inducted into the Hall of Fame.

You pointed out before (correctly) that Rush would vote for Yes and we'll assume Genesis and Pink Floyd did the same. There's one problem, though: those are, likely, the only votes Yes would reliably count on as foundation. If the Hall of Fame had inducted acts like the Moody Blues, E.L.O., Emerson, Lake, and Palmer, and King Crimson, Yes would be in a sweet spot for induction as the voting block would give them a great foundation to build from. As a result, Yes had a severe handicap.

You can see something similar with Nine Inch Nails: if Kraftwerk, Depeche Mode, Gary Numan, the Cure, and the Smiths were in, NIN would be a shoo-in. Sadly, none of those bands were inducted, so they had to get several votes to merely make up the difference, and NIN is very insular music compared to the usual ballots.

Compare the situation of Yes and NIN to that of Deep Purple: both bands could feasibly count on the support of Rush, Genesis, and Pink Floyd, but DP has a major advantage: cross-genre support. Led Zeppelin would vote for them, as would Black Sabbath or other harder rock acts or guitar players. Since this was a fairly meh year for first-timers, Deep Purple didn't have to compete with anyone unlike the last two times (Public Enemy and Nirvana. If they made the ballot last year, Green Day/NIN would have wrecked their chances). That, to me, was the bump that put them over the top and may pay dividends for bands like Judas Priest or Iron Maiden (or even Megadeth). Yes, sadly, only got one inductee since 2013 who would easily vote for them, and sadly, it was the already-inducted Peter Gabriel.

In my opinion, Yes's best chance may be in the middle of the coming decade (meaning the 90s): if the Hall tightens up, acts like Radiohead, Coldplay, Beck, Oasis, and, very arguably, Tool will get in, which combined with the 70s finally getting filled up (and I count E.L.O. as a comparatively safe act to Yes), may usher in ballots with less safer bands on them. By that time, Yes may have more artists to support them and less artists to compete with.

Just my opinion.

Posted by SotN on Sunday, 12.27.15 @ 04:44am


P.S.: Forgot to remove Nine Inch Nails from the Deep Purple paragraph.

Posted by SotN on Sunday, 12.27.15 @ 04:46am


SotN,

You certainly have an interesting perspective about Yes. As I have said previously, "I suspect that Yes was the sixth inductee." Rather than deal with the complicated logistics associated with inducting the many members of Yes this year, The Rock Hall had decided to induct 5 acts instead. If this is the case, then I suspect that Yes will once again return to the ballot next October. This time however, they will have even more competition, especially if Duran Duran, E.L.O. and The Moody Blues receive their first nominations and if Procol Harum returns to the nomination ballot. Then, the "Campaign For Yes" will need to be revived once again. The prospect of having 5 progressive rock bands on the same ballot is not really that outrageous, the year that Rush was finally nominated there were four. As far as who will vote for Yes is concerned, I think that there might be quite a few votes from other artists. The Hall probably could have avoided this prog "log jam," by inducting more than 5 acts each year and by inducting more progressive rock artists earlier. Please remember, that progressive rock artists will vote for other progressive rock artists, I think that Duran Duran will not only receive votes from Rush, Heart, Pink Floyd, Genesis, but also the new inductees, plus members of Blondie, Talking Heads, Elton John, etc. and of course the fan
vote. This should put them over the top.

Now, the question is how do we get Sade inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 12.27.15 @ 12:41pm


Enigmaticus: A few additions in three posts:

I think Yes was #7 personally (considering this class, my money is on the Cars as the #6). I don't think Yes's problem is any line-up for induction. Going over their page on Wikipedia (and this is just a skim), I'd make a guess along these lines:

First of all, Jon Anderson and Chris Squire are obvious inductees. Both had lengthly stays with the band which include both their fruitful early years as well as their 80s popularity spike, with Squire being the only continuous band member. For the others...

As Chad Channing and John Rutsey seem to prove, merely being in the original line-up isn't enough. They have failed to induct early members if they were off after one or two albums, so I'm not liking Peter Banks' chances (it's not inconceivable for him to make it in, but it's not something I'd bet on). They also don't seem to favor later members unless that band's "golden era" was during their time, so Benoit David, Jon Davison, Tom Brislin, Billy Sherwood, and Oliver Wakeman are all likely non-inductees. Igor Khoroshev would also likely not make it in, not just because of that fact, but also because of the circumstances of his removal. The Hall would not bother, I wouldn't think, with session musicians, but in all likelihood, the only one who would ever get inducted would possibly be Steve Porcaro, and only as a member of Toto (not sure on David Foster).

This leaves Trevor Horn, Trevor Rabin, Steve Howe, Tony Kaye, Rick Wakeman, Patrick Moraz, Geoff Downes, Eddie Jobson, Bill Bruford, and Alan White. As far as keyboards are concerned, Kaye would be a guaranteed inductee, with Wakeman also likely making it in since his stay was significant enough. Moraz, Downes, and Jobson would all be in the "one album curse" group (if Jobson had stayed for 90125, he may have made it). As far as drums and percussion, Bruford and White account for both their early success and their resurgence. Of them, White's a guaranteed, with Bruford being not as safe (Simper, anyone?), but still has good chances.

Finally, we're down to Horn, Rabin, and Howe. Howe would be likely, since he was the guitarist with the longest tenure. Rabin would also possibly get in due to their 80s peak. As for Horn, he's the odd man out. There's no question he was big in the 80s between his production or with his work in the Art of Noise. If the Hall wanted to recognize Horn, it's be either as a non-performer (likely) or as a member of Art of Noise (not happening). Personally, his tenure in Yes may get him in, but I would think the Hall would just induct Anderson and call it a day.

As a result, a Hall of Fame-inducted Yes would likely look something like this:

Jon Anderson
Steve Howe
Trevor Rabin
Chris Squire
Tony Kaye
Rick Wakeman
Bill Bruford
Alan White

Posted by SotN on Tuesday, 12.29.15 @ 15:39pm


SotN,

I do agree with your list of chosen inductees for Yes. However, I do think that Yes will return to the nomination ballot next year, as well as the aforementioned progressive rock artists. Thus far, Yes had lost only two previous members (Peter Banks and Chris Squire). I also think that Yes would have been the sixth inductee. I think that if the Cars were sixth, they would have been inducted. However, inducting three prog acts in the same year would have led to a backlash from the punkophiles.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 12.29.15 @ 15:58pm


Post 2. Do I think Sade will get in someday? Yeah: they've been considered, so the Hall is aware of them. The only issue is that the Hall has been dreadful in the three categories Sade represents:

1. 80s British. Since 2004, the only four inducted acts to have had solid 80s success that were British (discounting U2) were George Harrison, Genesis, Peter Gabriel, and the Pretenders. Even this isn't saying much, because Harrison's got far more reasons for induction than his 80s output (charity work, Beatle, etc.). Genesis, you already know, were very successful in the 70s so even though the 80s were when they were at their commercially biggest, they were still at their core a 70s inductee with a second, more mainstream stardom in the 80s (like Yes). Peter Gabriel experienced his biggest success (commercial and otherwise) in the 80s, but even he had success in the 70s solo (Car's still considered a great album). The Pretenders are the best-off 80s band of this group. The Hall, whether now or later, needs to address the chasm of the 80s in general, and especially British musicians. They can't keep upping 70s icons and expect no fallout.

2. R&B. Never mind the 80s, the Hall's struggling with acts from the 70s. When War, the Spinners, the Marvelettes, and Chic can't get in, the Hall's not going to be going after an 80s act, especially when 80s R&B has a slightly shaky reputation.

3. Female vocalists, especially in the 80s. Excluding Heart (to a minor degree), Joan Jett, and Madonna, the bulk of the women inducted since 2004 were either out by 1980 or on the wane (Blondie or Donna Summer). Three of the biggest female stars of the 80s were Whitney Houston, Janet Jackson, and, going into the 90s, Mariah Carey (all of them, coincidentally, R&B acts), all of whom aren't inducted, and if they aren't inducted, Sade's short-term induction chances are pretty terrible.

Sade's been previously considered, so they do have a leg-up. Unfortunately, with the odds against them, I can't see them getting inducted when far bigger snubs in these categories are still on the outside, waiting.

Posted by SotN on Wednesday, 12.30.15 @ 10:32am


SotN,

Thank you for your response. I do agree that the rhythm and blues' artists have been having quite a bit of difficulty being inducted in recent years. Unlike many of the aforementioned r & b artists however, Sade Adu had written her own lyrics and her own music. Also, Sade happens to have that jazz influence in their music which happens to appeal to the progressive rock audience, also. Jazz is probably the most complicated variety of popular music, overall. Progressive rock had pulled much of it's structure not only from Classical music, but also from jazz. I think that the recent induction of Chicago and the previous induction of Steely Dan, plus the previous inductions of Pink Floyd, Genesis, Rush and Traffic will work in their favor.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 12.30.15 @ 11:38am


Enig,

I am so very disappointed that Yes were not inducted for 2016. We certainly say that Yes have been considered and also nominated twice. I do agree with You and also suspect that Yes were the sixth Inductee. It's like you say that Rather than deal with the Complicated logistics the Rock Hall had decided to Induct 5 acts instead as a Cop out.

I suspect that Yes were the sixth Inductee and the Cars were 7th. We'll focus on Yes since this is a Yes forum.

I will share a brief History of my Yes experience. I was 6 Years old when Yes released The Yes Album. I was 7 years Old when Yes release Fragile and Close to the Edge. I was 14 Years Old when I was first introduced to the Music of Yes. I was 19 Years Old when I attended my First Yes concert. It was the 90125 Tour. I STILL have the T shirt from that Concert. I wore it recently. I was 35 Years Old when I attended my 2nd Yea concert. That was in 2000. I'm not sure if they were supporting an album. I just wanted to give you my experience with Yes.

Posted by Ben on Thursday, 01.7.16 @ 05:29am


Ben,

Thank you for agreeing with me about Yes being the 6th inductee. What I really cannot understand at all, is why there were not six, or even 7 inductees. Of the five inductees chosen, I think that Chicago definitely deserves to be the headliner, but I have a feeling that Deep Purple will do something quite amazing, as well. If David Coverdale is somehow able to get Ritchie Blackmore to attend, then it could really be fantastic.

As I have said previously, I had been introduced to the music of Yes in the early summer of 1981. The first time that I had heard "Fragile" was quite an amazing experience. My first Yes concert was in October, 1999. Yes had been my third major rock concert, preceded only by The Moody Blues, also in October, 1999 and of course, Rush on June 7, 1992.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 01.7.16 @ 08:22am


Enig,

You said it yourself." Rather than deal with the complicated logistics associated with inducting the many members of Yes this year, The Rock Hall had decided to induct 5 acts instead".

I agree with this completely. It was a cop out. It makes sense that this is what Happened. Yes as the 6th Inductee is probably what happened. The Hall didn't want to deal with all the lineups of members. So what do they do. Make it 5. Cars were probably 7th. The Cars had a steady lineup but The 7th Inductee is not so likely to Jump in as an inductee.

It was a Non Verbal way of leaving out Yes. I will say then that since Yes missed the Hall may skip a Year on them. The Hall a very likely to give Moody Blues a shot next year instead. Ahh but Yes will return in a big way for 2018 I think. I researched the Previously Considered artists. I discovered that Duran Duran have never even been mentioned or Considered. ELO, Moody Blues and Sade have been Previously Considered. So those would be Nominated first. Yes will return but they may skip a Year. The Hall does that allll the time.

Posted by Ben on Friday, 01.8.16 @ 06:31am


Ben,

Thank you for agreeing with me about Yes. I have little doubt that Yes would have been the sixth inductee and I would not be surprised at all, if The Cars were seventh. Ultimately, this class should have included three "progressive rock" bands. Now if Yes had been inducted, the Rock Hall would have appeared to have been more "rockist," plus who would have been the headliner?

I cannot see how anyone would have voted for n.w.a. over Yes; this is extremely incomprehensible and highly illogical. Just because they may have inspired a genre, does not mean that that genre had needed to be acknowledged. Not all genres need to be inducted, especially not ones which openly advocate hatred, racism and violence. Also, I have heard that their alleged "biopic," which I have not seen, nor do I have any intention of seeing, a fictional film which seems to have left out their misogynistic, racist and homophobic tendencies. Without knowing that much about this group, I had read the lyrics to no less than 17 of n.w.a.'s songs. I had become so unbelievably upset by their lyrics openly discussing the alleged murder of women, because they had not pleased them, that I had been utterly disgusted by their use of artistic license. After reading these lyrics, I had to wonder if misogyny is endemic to this culture? Do these individuals actually hate their own mothers and perhaps their own sisters and daughters also? How does this "supposed" kind of art lead to the betterment of our society?

Yes, and most of progressive rock for that matter, on the other hand, was always about self- actualization and the evolution of our society. Progressive rock had sought to improve humanity.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 01.8.16 @ 09:01am


Ben,

Thank you for agreeing with me about Yes. I have little doubt that Yes would have been the sixth inductee and I would not be surprised at all, if The Cars had been seventh on this list. . Ultimately, this class should have included three "progressive rock" bands. Now if Yes had been inducted, the Rock Hall would have appeared to have been more "rockist," plus it might have been quite difficult to determine, who would have been the headliner?

I cannot see how anyone would have voted for n.w.a. over Yes; this is extremely incomprehensible and highly illogical. Just because they may have inspired a genre, does not mean that this particular genre had needed to be acknowledged. Not all genres need to be inducted, especially not ones which openly advocate hatred, racism and violence. Also, I have heard that their alleged "biopic," which I have not seen, nor do I have any intention of seeing, is a fictional film which seems to have left out their most misogynistic, racist and homophobic tendencies. Without knowing that much about this group, I had read the lyrics to no less than 17 of n.w.a.'s songs. I had become so unbelievably furious by their lyrics openly discussing the alleged murder of women, because they had not pleased them, that I had become so utterly disgusted by their abuse of artistic license. After reading these lyrics, I had to wonder if misogyny is endemic to this culture? Do these individuals actually hate their own mothers and perhaps their own sisters and daughters also? How does this "supposed" kind of art lead to the betterment of our society?

The lyrics of Yes, and most of progressive rock for that matter, on the other hand, has always been about self- actualization and the evolution of our society. Progressive rock had sought to improve humanity, not to detract from it.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 01.8.16 @ 09:17am


Enig,

I do agree with you. The Rock Hall somehow left out Yes so that they don't have to seem more "Rockist".
A key point you made is that if Yes had been Inducted then it may have been rather difficult to determine who would have been the Headliner.

So by leaving out Yes it's a little easier. I'm going with either Cheap Trick or Deep Purple. I was going to mention that Deep Purple were inducted over Yes because the Hall is more used to taking care of Hard Rock snubs. Clearly Deep Purple were partly Prog but unlike Yes they have Cross Genre support. Led Zep members and Black Sabbath members voted for Peep Purple as well as Van Halen, Alice Cooper and Kiss. Same thing with other Hard Rock players. Heck I can see Neil Young and the Queen members voting for DP as well as Pink Floyd and Rush.

Now as far as NWA going in and Not Yes. That is ridiculous. I do not support Hard core Rap. I admit I saw them as a possibility but not without Yes going in. Clearly so that the Hall didn't have to look more Rockist they got those guys in.
The main reason Yes are not in is due to the complicated line ups I would say the Hall would have dealt with on top of Chicago and Deep Purple. The end result though is NWA is in and not Yes.

Posted by Ben on Monday, 01.11.16 @ 05:09am


Ben,

Thank you for your response. As I had said previously, "I do not understand why Yes was not inducted."

I am also appreciative of the fact that you do not support "hard core" rap. I do not have a problem with most rap as an art form, unto itself. However, I am strongly against those individuals who have advocated misogyny, racism, homophobia and violence. As bad as they are, perhaps even worse are their supporters. One has to wonder if they also not only hate their mothers, sisters and daughters, but also their wives and girlfriends. At least that is the way that it appears to me. What other reason could there be for advocating for n.w.a.'s induction? Oh wait, was there also a lot of money to be made in the process, wasn't there? Well, that explains everything; does it not?

Yes, should have garnered quite a few votes across the spectrum. However, I do believe that most of the previous inductees into the Rock Hall would have voted for Yes. Perhaps, the industry insiders and the critics did not?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.11.16 @ 09:11am


Not all NWA supporters are violent, racist, or hateful. Don't go around stereotyping supporters based on they say lyrically. You may not support them but like it or not they were influential and the rock hall was right to put them in for that reason.

Posted by Greg F on Monday, 01.11.16 @ 09:33am


And maybe Enig and Ben, that with the four classic rock acts that did get in, as well as the Cars, the Smiths, and NIN, the ballot just got split hard enough that Yes simply fell short. Try that logic on for size.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 01.11.16 @ 23:36pm


Yes was nominated in 2014 and then again in 2016. I'd venture a guess they won't be nominated in 2017 but might get another nomination the following year.

I'm pulling for them, though.

Posted by Marissa on Monday, 01.11.16 @ 23:48pm


ENIG

Moody Blues time 2016. YES ain't got the votes. It's a shame but that's how cookie has crumbled. David Bowie already in Hall Of Fame but maybe some of his FAV groups will get a push. Curious how this ballot turns out. Hope it is as good as 2015. KING

Posted by KING on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 00:26am


I think The complicated lineup change theory has a lot of merit with Yes. It's not because acts with Line up changes are avoided. Clearly not. It's because both Chicago and Deep Purple had lots of line up changes. The Hall probably didn't want a third to deal with.

I am saying also that since Yes was nominated in 2014 and 2016 that they won't be nominated for 2017 but might get a Nom for 2018. I think it's Moody Blues time. Hey there's less line up changes for sure. Also I think the Moody Blues can get more votes. They as you know go back to the 60s. People like Pete Townsend, Doors survivors, Eric Burdon and surviving Grateful Dead members could easily Vote for the Moody Blues. Certainly 70s acts like Pink Floyd, Genesis and Rush would. Very easily Jefferson Airplane could. The list goes on. At least for now the Moody Blues could have more votes.

Moody Blues will be on my list for 2017. As for Yes they will return for sure just not right away Perhaps.

Posted by Ben on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 05:08am


Greg F.,

Please tell me what positive outcome will result from inducting such a blatantly offensive group. I am more than interested in hearing your perspective on this. Meanwhile, please tell me why The Spinners and Chaka Khan, both of which I would have supported, were not inducted? I need to rephrase my previous remark, "What other reason could there possibly be for advocating for n.w.a.'s induction? Oh wait, there was also a lot of money to be made in the process; wasn't there? Well that explains everything, doesn't it?"

Once again, I had voted for the following artists on the previous nomination ballot: Yes, Deep Purple, Chicago, The Spinners and The Cars.

Ben,

Would I support The Moody Blues? Absolutely. I have no problem with supporting most "progressive rock" acts. If Yes does return to the ballot next year, they will also receive my vote. The same thing is true for Electric Light Orchestra and of course, Duran Duran. If Sade happens to appear on the ballot, she and her ensemble will also receive my vote, even over Procol Harum.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 08:37am


It makes sense to include them. They were a big part of rap history and they are one of those that need to be included to accurately represent history. N.W.A. brought awareness of what happens in the ghetto and those people a voice and persective.

Posted by Greg F on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 12:39pm


And to answer you other question. It beats me on why there wasn't enough votes for them. Perhaps some of voters vote with the show in mind like who people want to see at the show rather than who was the most important is probably why The Spinners and Chaka Khan were left out. As for you The Cars and Yes being left, the ballot was crowded with classic rock artists and and as a result some canceled out.

Posted by Greg F on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 12:52pm


I meant as for why and not as for you.

Posted by Greg F on Tuesday, 01.12.16 @ 12:59pm


Yes is second on my list of favorite bands, slightly above The Moody Blues and slightly below Rush. Yes is also my co-favorite band musically. The only reason why Rush is placed slightly higher than Yes is due to their lyrics.

Later this year, will mark the 35th anniversary of my introduction to the music of Yes. My favorite song by Yes is 'Awaken,' more specifically the 18 minute long version from "Keys To Ascension." 'Awaken' is also my second favorite song, slightly below 'Xanadu' by Rush and slightly above the version of 'Legend Of A Mind' from "A Night At Red Rocks" by The Moody Blues. My fourth favorite song happens to be 'Dreamline,' from "Clockwork Angels Tour" by Rush. However, "Clockwork Angels Tour" is second on my list of favorite progressive rock albums, slightly below "Exit... Stage Left" and slightly above "Keys To Ascension" by Yes.

Here are my 20 favorite studio and live progressive rock albums:

01. Rush: Exit... Stage Left (1981)
02. Rush: Clockwork Angels Tour (2013)
03. Yes: Keys To Ascension (1996)
04. Yes: Keys To Ascension 2 (1997)
05. The Moody Blues: A Night At Red Rocks with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra (1992)
06. Pink Floyd: p.u.l.s.e. (1995)
07. Jethro Tull: Bursting Out (1978)
08. Gentle Giant: Free Hand (1975)
09. King Crimson: In The Court Of The Crimson King (1969)
10. Duran Duran: A Diamond In The Mind: Live 2011 (2012)
11. Talking Heads: Stop Making Sense (1984)
12. Rush: Roll The Bones (1991)
13. Echolyn: As The World (1995)
14. Kansas: Leftoverture (1976)
15. Yes: Symphonic Live (2009)
16. Roxy Music: Avalon (1982)
17. Rush: Presto (1989)
18. Yes: Close To The Edge (1972)
19. The Moody Blues: To Our Children's Children's Children (1969)
20. Rush: R40 Live (2015)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.18.16 @ 09:35am


Enig,
Which do you enjoy more?:
Your 17th favorite Rush song, your 14th favorite Yes song, or your 9th favorite Moody Blues song?

Posted by Classic Rock on Monday, 01.18.16 @ 11:49am


Classic Rock,

That is a tough question. I would probably say that I would enjoy my 17th favorite Rush song, 'Red Tide,' slightly more than my 9th favorite Moody Blues' song. I would enjoy my 14th favorite Yes song, 'Siberian Khatru' slightly more than my 17th favorite Rush song.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 02.3.16 @ 09:23am


There are also several major anniversaries of various Yes studio albums and live recordings this year, also.

February 19, will mark the 45th anniversary of the release of "The Yes Album."

On October 28, "Keys To Ascension" will celebrate it's 20th anniversary.

On May 21, "Keystudio" will be 15 years old.

On December 4, "Magnification" will also celebrate it's 15th anniversary.

I have not included "Fragile," since it was not released until January 4, 1972 in the U.S.

On June 22, "Fly From Here" will celebrate the 5th anniversary of it's release date.

On November 29, "In The Present- Live From Lyon" will also celebrate the 5th anniversary.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 02.4.16 @ 09:03am


If there was a drumming hall of fame Bill Bruford and Alan White would be in it.

If ther was a bassist hall of fame Chris Squire would be in it.

If there was a guitarist hall of fame Steve Howe would be in it.

If there was a keyboard hall of fame Rick Wakeman would be in it.

If there is a heaven Jon Anderson would be in it.

Anyone can light a candle but not they way they did.

What a blessing to be alive and to listen to such bueatiful music.

Posted by Kevi on Sunday, 02.7.16 @ 00:56am


Progressive rock, art rock and prog adjacent bands will vote for other artists of the same genres. Since, Deep Purple and Chicago are being inducted this year, I would infer that the members of those bands, in addition to the members of Talking Heads, The Police, Rush, Heart, Pink Floyd, Genesis, Traffic, Jefferson Airplane, CSN&Y, Grateful Dead, R.E.M. and quite a few others will support the inductions of The Moody Blues and Yes later this year.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.7.16 @ 13:30pm


Kevi,

I agree with you about the members of Yes, as individual instrumentalists, being Hall Of Fame worthy. Yes is an absolutely magnificent band and in my honest opinion, their only rival is Rush, when it comes to being the greatest progressive rock band. I place both Yes and Rush on the Mount Everest, of progressive rock, or so to speak.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.7.16 @ 13:39pm


Absolutely deserve to be in RRHOF. Each of the many members were some of the greatest at their instrument. And now, because the RRHOF has waited too long, Chris Squire has passed before this was rectified. Shame on the voters for not giving them their due.

Posted by Tinger on Tuesday, 02.9.16 @ 03:45am


Today is the 45th anniversary of the release of "The Yes Album."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 02.19.16 @ 08:39am


Yes absolutely deserve to be in the Rock Hall. I feel it's partly a result of all those years of 5 acts a Year. I was fair and stated that when those like Black Sabbath, Blondie REM Patti Smith and Van Halen were going in why does that mean Yes didn't. Yes could have and should have been inducted about 20 Years ago. In fact 20 Years ago at this time in 1996 Pink Floyd were inducted along with David Bowie and Jefferson Airplane. It seems to me that Yes could have gone in just after that given that Pink Floyd were a little late. Why couldn't Yes be inducted in 1997 or 1998?

Posted by Ben on Saturday, 02.27.16 @ 08:31am


I once heard Tom Petty say "For rock music to be big good it shouldn't be played well. Yes is filled with virtuosos. It really isn't a rock band. They seem to be in their own genre. Any way since Chris Squire died does the RRHOF really matter?

Posted by ken on Monday, 03.7.16 @ 15:05pm


I have mentioned before that Yes could have have been Inducted about 20 Years Ago. Pink Floyd were Inducted along with David Bowie, Jefferson Airplane and Gladys Knight & The Pips. Yes Could have been Inducted just after Pink Floyd who were a little late. It makes sense that Yes could have been a little late around 1997 or 1998. In 1998. The Eagles, Fleetwood Mac Mamas & Papas Lloyd Price and Santana. Yes could have been added to those.

Nobody had to be excluded. I dont even know Lloyd Price well. They could have kept him the Eagles, etc and add Yes. They would have been only slighly late NOT delayed shamelessly like this. Slightly late Like David Bowie, Pink Floyd and Crosby, Stills & Nash is Ok. Im a fan of all those.

Posted by Ben on Saturday, 04.16.16 @ 07:27am


Ben,
If you don't know who Lloyd Price is, well then that's your fault. He some major hits in '50 including "Lawdy Miss Clawdy," "Personality," and "Stagger Lee." He is a great soul/R&B singer who emerged as a major talent during the first decade of rock and roll. You should check out Price's work, it's quite underrated IMO. He's just a largely forgotten name when compared to the likes of Sam Cooke, Ray Charles, and Fats Domino.

The 1998 class was very strong and balanced class: 2 '50s artists (Gene Vincent and Lloyd Price), 2 '60 acts (The Mamas and the Papas and Santana, yes I know the later continued beyond the '60s but Santana is identifiable with Woodstock era so I'm just lumping them to this decade for the sake of this point), and 2 '70s artists (The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac). The point is that the '50s were still a priority for the Rock Hall, even in the late '90s but they also started acknowledged pioneering and deserving candidates of the '70s. This is when the ballots were super competitive and again, starting a new emphasis on the '70s with nominated acts that year like Billy Joel, The Stooges, and Earth, Wind & Fire. But the other acts were primarily from the '50s and '60s including The Moonglows,Solomon Burke, Dusty Springfield, Gene Pitney, Del Shannon, and Joe Tex. These two decades, especially the '60s, were largely where the Rock Hall nominated and inducted artists. Anyway it's framed, Yes probably wouldn't have been a priority for the Rock Hall, especially as early as 1998.

I love Yes and they should be inducted ASAP to the Rock Hall, but you have to remember that the Rock Hall has always held a bias against progressive rock. They thought, well, Pink Floyd's inducted and that covers ground. It took years before another progressive rock act was even nominated, let alone inducted. In a fantasy world, Yes would not have to wait too long for induction, but their music is polarizing, in the sense that people have a strong reaction: either you love them or hate them. Remember that Dave Marsh interview from last year when he said Yes was by far the weakest act on the 2016 ballot. He loathed Yes so much for their pretentiousness and terrible music, I'm paraphrasing Marsh's words here but that's pretty much what he said. I believe many on the Nominating Committee feel the same way about Yes as Marsh, akin to Kiss, Deep Purple, and Chicago. The stigmas of a relatively popular act that doesn't always get the critical reception given to other artist. But the Rock Hall has become so populist in the last few years that a Yes induction seems plausible and they are among the biggest snubs in the Rock Hall right now.

Again, I like Yes and predict they will reappear on the 2017 ballot (hopefully this time less classic rock this time around so they actually have a fighting chance), and I think they will be inducted on their next appearance. But at the same, it's a coulda-woulda-shoulda situation regarding Yes' Rock Hall induction. But we shouldn't discount the achievements of pioneering and inducted '50s and even '60s artists either.

Posted by Nick on Saturday, 04.16.16 @ 09:23am


Nick,

Im glad yu responded. I know and own one song by Lloyd Price. Personality. Do Not know him as well as 60s artists like Mamas And Papas who were also inducted in 1998.I said they could have kept him the Eagles Fleetwood Mac Mamas and Papas and of course the great Santana. They could have added Yes. Nobody had to be excluded. Lloyd Price is Respect for 50s. Mamas and Papas and Santana respect for 60s. Yes could have been added.

Posted by Ben on Tuesday, 04.19.16 @ 05:26am


So just to clear up about Lloyd Price. I do know who Lloyd Price is. Personality was a Top 10 hit around 1959. A fine hit.I did say to could have kept Lloyd Price in 1998. I dont him Well. I know Mamas and Papas very and of course Santana. I own a whole bunch of Santana albums. Hypothetically they could have added Yes to those. I used 1998 as an example. It was strong and balanced. As an example they could Have added Yes.

I do know Solomon Burke and Joe Tex quite well. They were more 60s. Thats where my knowledge kicks in more. I like those 2. Joe Tex needs to still go in. I was glad Solomon Burke was inducted in 2001.

I love Yes. It was just wishful thinking. You are totally right that the Rock Hall has always held a Bias against Progressive Rock. No 50s or 60s artist should have been excluded. The Flamingos were Inducted in 2001 along with Solomon Burke. Aerosmith and Queen among others were too. 2001 was also a strong Class. In 2002 Gene Pitney was inducted and so was Tom Petty and Talking Heads. Again Strong. They did catch up good this Year with Chicago Deep Purple and the rest. Yu may respond. Lloyd Price is perfectly fine. He went in at the right time. We will see what happens with Yes and other snubs Now.

Posted by Ben on Tuesday, 04.19.16 @ 06:00am


The record company owner, Richie Finestra from the new HBO Series "Vinyl" is definitely not a fan of "progressive rock." In the second episode of the series no less than four disparaging comments were made about Yes, ELP, Jefferson Airplane and Jethro Tull. Also, even more offensive was his pulling "Thick As A Brick" off the turntable and breaking it in to two pieces. One can only surmise that this series which espouses the virtues of punk and disco will undoubtedly support the arrogant opinion that only those genres matter.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 04.19.16 @ 10:36am


Nick,

So I was saying in retrospect that Yes could have been added to the Class with Lloyd Price, Eagles Fleetwood Mac and Santana. Yes could have been added to any of the late 90s early 2000s Classes really. Alas they weren't because of bias against Progressive Rock.

Enig,

I haven't watched Vinyl yet. It sounds like Rock Hall Nominating Committee people would like it. Its like I was saying No Genre should b excluded. Yes could have coexisted in a Class with 50s and 60s artists as well as some Punk. But there is Bias. Thus Yes does wait.

Posted by Ben on Tuesday, 04.19.16 @ 18:57pm


Ben,
In a perfect world, Yes would have been no-brainers and inducted almost immediately after they were eligible. Yes is actually my all-time favorite Progressive Rock band. The problem, thou, is the strong prejudices against Progressive Rock on the Rock Hall Nominating Committee, as I noted in an earlier post and saw you agreed with me here. Case in point: Pink Floyd, love them or hate them, should haver been first-ballot HOF-ers. It's ridiculous they had to wait 4-5 years after eligibility to seek induction. They were nominated their first year of eligibility, I think for the 1992 ceremony, but were passed over. They then didn't appear until the 1996 ceremony where they were finally inducted. The point I'm making here is that if Pink Floyd had that much trouble getting inducted (their albums are among the most commercially successful records ever released), there was little hope for a Yes induction in the late 90s or even the early 00s. I think Yes should receive automatic induction for the 2017 ceremony, but the problem is that the two ballots Yes appeared, they were competing against other classic rock giants (e.g., Deep Purple, The Cars, Cheap Trick, Chicago, Kiss). If Yes appears on another ballot, I think they will be inducted--especially if the committee decides to regulate the number of classic rock choices for voters.

I definitely agree that Joe Tex deserves another nomination. He was nominated like 4 or 5 times over the years and is a forgotten icon of 60s/70s R&B/Soul. I believe Dave Marsh is a big fan of Tex, so there's always hope he will fight for another Tex nomination in the future. I wish thou Tex was inducted in the late 90s or even the first decade of the 00s, because he stands little chance for induction. Especially now that the Rock Hall inducts very few R&B/Soul acts. If Solomon Burke or even Gene Pitney weren't inducted in 01/02 akin to the Tex situation, I highly doubt they would be inducted in the current populist voting ways of the larger voting body. It's sad but true.

Posted by Nick on Tuesday, 04.19.16 @ 19:16pm


Nick,

We do agree. You may have misunderstood what I said about Lloyd Price. I don't know him Well. I do know him. When I said Keep him I had meant that he absolutely should have been Inducted in the Hall in 1998 as he was along with the Eagles, Fleetwood Mac Santana. I was saying that Yes could have been added to all of them. You are also absolutely right that there is Tremendous bias against Progressive Rock. Hence they did Not. Hey could have been added to the 5 in 2003 for that Matter with Righteous Brothers AC/DC The Police all those. Righteous Brothers are well deserved and so is the Police. The others in 2003.

Its wishful thinking as far as Yes. Yes are still waiting. There was too much competition. As you said Deep Purple, The Cars Chicago and Kiss. They wanted to satisfy the Kiss army for 2014 as well as induct 2 very fine artists Cat Stevens and Linda Ronstadt. There is always mellow to balance out loud in a Rock Hall class.

Now Joe Tex deserves another nomination. I know him. Hold What You've Got was a Top Ten hit in 1965. He had numerous R&B hits. He was indeed nominated about 5 times. He should have been Inducted a long while ago. I do agree the Rock Hall inducts very few R&B acts now. There is a current populist Trend. Also they fired a lot of the Oldest people on the Committee. This created the Populist trend and a trend to 70s Rock I love. However, Sadly this reduces chances for an Artist like Joe Tex. Its not fair but it seems to be How it is Now.

I love most of the artists that went in like Chicago and Deep Purple but Joe Tex loses out. Now I do think Yes have improved chances with the Updated committee. I support Joe Tex and also bands like Yes. It can be both but I don't think so. It would certainly bring diversity to the Hall. I don't think its So likely for Joe Tex. Sad but true.

Posted by Ben on Wednesday, 04.20.16 @ 08:00am


Nick,

Not to confuse things too much but I actually think the Hall will skip a Shot at Yes for the 2017 Ceremony. I personally think they will Nominate the Moody Blues instead. Also I am predicting a a few R&b acts for nomination. Ones later than Joe Tex. The Meters and the Spinners seem likely as well as Janet Jackson. Clearly later R&B. I think so. Yes may return in 2018.

Posted by Ben on Wednesday, 04.20.16 @ 12:32pm


Enig.

It has been awhile. I read what you said about the disrespect for Progressive Rock on the Series Vinyl. I am sorry to hear that. I was going to watch that show. Im not so sure Now. Maybe for other forms of Rock and Music.

I have been having a Nice Chat with Nick. I thought Yes could have gone in with Lloyd Price, Eagle and Fleetwood Mac. I know Lloyd Price a bit. Lloyd Price was deservedly inducted. I am not an Eagles fan by the way but I am not surprised. Leading band of the 70s. I think they are boring. I thought Yes could have been Added to those. Each year in the late 90s early 2000s. Some 50s 60s artists were caught up on. Homage is important. Solomon Burke was inducted with Aerosmith Queen and Steely Dan back in 2001. Yes could have been added but weren't and never were down the line. Sooo here we are.

A good point is the Hall has a strong Bias against Progressive Rock. People like Dave Marsh have a big say in the Rock Hall. That is unfortunate in light of the fact he thought Yes were the weakest act on the 2016 Ballot. I recall reading that. Well people like you and me differ strongly. They could have an added act Years back and weren't. Homage to 50s and 60s could co exist with Yes but doesn't.

So I can understand Inducting Lloyd Price and Solomon Burke first. Then they shrank the classes to 5. Sooo easily Yes could have gone at the same time as REM and the Ronettes, It still didn't happen and hasn't. It is due to the bias against Progressive Rock. So Here we are. Hopefully Yes can be inducted 2017-2019. Anywhere in there is Fine. It would seem that more respect for Prog rock should come soon. The Committee has changed. Induction of Rush brings Hope.

Posted by Ben on Thursday, 04.21.16 @ 08:49am


What I meant is that they shrank the Classes to 5. Yes could easily been added to 5. It still didn't happen. That was due to the bias against Prog Rock plus the shrunk classes. That's why No matter what No Yes. There may be more hope Now.

Posted by Ben on Friday, 04.22.16 @ 15:34pm


Ben,

Agreed, apparently Dave Marsh is not a huge fan of prog. To Jann Wenner's credit, he had presided over the 2013 ceremony which had included Rush's induction. Unfortunately much of the blame for the lack of prog acts in the hall has been placed squarely upon his shoulders. I think that Yes will finally be inducted in 2017, along with several more "prog" and "prog adjacent" artists. The Rock Hall could improve their credibility immensely by supporting such a ceremony.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 04.30.16 @ 13:40pm


I certainly agree that Dave Marsh is not a huge fan of Prog. This is disappointing because Dave Marsh was a biographer for the Who. The Who are actually my Favorite Band. He has highly praised the Who. I assume that Includes Tommy. A concept album and a Rock Opera. I am a fanatical fan of the Who. It is Ironic that he is not a huge fan of true Prog Rock.

I think The Hall may skip a year on Yes and try out the Moody Blues as a nominee. I think the Moodys can get more Votes because they go back much deeper into the 1960's. I think Yes will return in 2018. Im rooting for Yes but that's what I predict due to the dislike of Prog in the Hall. It seems like one at a time for Prog with the Ballots

Posted by Ben on Saturday, 05.7.16 @ 06:22am


I am impressed that "Tales From Topographic Oceans" has been chosen as an important Yes album. "TFTO" has been one of my favorite Yes albums, since I had first purchased a copy of it on vinyl nearly 35 years ago. I will reiterate that Yes has been my co-favorite band musically for the past 35 years.

"Relayer" has not been one of my favorite albums by Yes, however. Certainly, I enjoy much of 'The Gates Of Delirium' Especially 'Soon.' I also thoroughly enjoy,'To Be Over.' On the other hand, I can think of several Yes songs which are far better than 'Sound Chaser.'

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 06.4.16 @ 08:13am


I have now been an aficionado of "progressive rock" and Yes' music, in particular for over 35 consecutive years. This does not mean that I happen to enjoy the music of every prog act, either. There are always some artists in various genres whose output happens to be somewhat disappointing, however there are also quite a few artists who emit flashes of brilliance from time to time.

Of those artists who have not yet been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame, I feel that Yes, Electric Light Orchestra, The Moody Blues, Duran Duran, Sade and Carly Simon have the strongest overall discographies. I would also not object to either The Doobie Brothers, nor Foreigner receiving a
nomination, also.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 07.18.16 @ 09:28am


In addition to being a huge advocate for other artists, I am a huge advocate for Yes:

Yes has created some of the most amazing music over the past 46 years. Beginning with their debut album, "Yes," Yes had introduced a very different musical style into the rock canon. Although their predecessors, The Moody Blues and Procol Harum had co-founded the "progressive rock" genre prior to Yes' formation, Yes had continued to evolve as a band, releasing some of their most brilliant work during the 1970's. Albums such as "The Yes Album," "Fragile" and "Close To The Edge" had also been critically lauded. "The Yes Album" had featured such timeless progressive rock gems as 'Yours Is No Disgrace,' 'Starship Trooper' and 'Your Move/All Good People.' "Fragile" had featured the classic rock radio staple, 'Roundabout,' in addition to 'Long Distance Runaround,' 'Heart Of The Sunrise' and the chillingly brilliant 'South Side Of The Sky.' "Close To The Edge" had upped the ante, with the brilliant 'Siberian Khatru,' the sublime 'And You And I' and the extraordinary epic, 'Close To The Edge.' "Close To The Edge" has been lauded by many as quite possibly, "progressive Rock's definitive masterwork."

Their creative output did not stop there, "Going
For The One," with the brilliant epic, 'Awaken' and the sublime, 'Turn Of The Century' attest to this fact.


Although not a critically revered album, "Tales From Topographic Oceans" is also a masterpiece, featuring only 4 side long songs, the greatest of which are: 'The Revealing Science Of God' and 'Ritual.' "Tales" is perhaps a bit too far
ahead of it's time, in order to be fully appreciated. Of course, I also enjoy the sublime 'The Remembering' and the transformative, 'The Ancient.'

'The Gates Of Delirium' from "Relayer" is another epic work.

In the 1980's Yes was not afraid to change their style with the times and release "90125" with it's hit single, 'Owner Of A Lonely Heart.'

In the mid 1990's, Yes released the brilliant "Keys To Ascension" albums, which had showed that could Yes not only perform their previous masterworks in a live setting, but also release creative material in another decade. They had also released "The Ladder."

In the early 21st century, Yes had released another masterpiece, "Magnification" and had the audacity to tour with a symphony orchestra.

Yes has also been an influence on many of those previous inductees.

For these many reasons, in addition to those previously mentioned, Yes should receive their long overdue induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Let's get them inducted in 2017!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 08.27.16 @ 12:05pm


Today is the 44th anniversary of the release of "Close To The Edge." "Close To The Edge" has been described as "quite possibly progressive rock's defining masterwork." There are only three tracks on "Close To The Edge": 'Close To The Edge,' 'And You And I' and 'Siberian Khatru.'

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 09.13.16 @ 09:33am


According to Wikipedia, today is the 15th anniversary of the release of "Magnification," the recording which I consider to be Yes' last great masterpiece. A review of "Magnification" will be forthcoming.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 09.20.16 @ 03:16am


As I have stated previously, Yes is my co-favorite band musically, alongside Rush.

The recent passing of Chris Squire has led to another nomination for Yes.

I am utterly surprised and find that it is almost completely inexplicable that Yes has not yet been inducted.

Yes has influenced numerous artists.

If you are interested in finding out more information about Yes, then please look up the following item: "The Campaign That Rocked Washington."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.8.16 @ 03:52am


I could see them make the ballot again, but not for another 2 or 3 years. And it'll likely be another "No" for Yes.
They're decent, though.

Posted by Ryan on Saturday, 10.8.16 @ 08:00am


Ryan,

I respectfully disagree with you on this. I think that Yes will be nominated and be inducted in 2017, alongside these other musical luminaries: The Moody Blues, E.L.O., Duran Duran, Sade and Carly Simon.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.15.16 @ 12:08pm


As far as I am concerned, the induction of Yes into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame is essential. Personally, they are my co-favorite band musically, alongside Rush and my second favorite prog artist of all time.

Yes had influenced Rush and quite a few other artists.

The late Chris Squire, Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman, as well as former member Bill Bruford and Alan White are considered to be top notch musicians. Former founding member Jon Anderson was also recognized as "Prog God," by PROG magazine.

Yes has been innovative and remarkably cconsistent throughout the body of their discography.

Yes has never been afraid to experiment with new sounds, techniques, or with other styles.

Yes does indeed deserve immediate induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. Let's get them inducted in 2017!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.15.16 @ 12:18pm


Congratulations to the members of Yes for your recent nomination for Rock Hall induction.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 10.19.16 @ 02:36am


Congratulations to the members of Yes for your recent nomination for Rock Hall induction. Let's hope that the third time is a charm.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 10.19.16 @ 02:39am


https://www.rockhall.com/nominee/yes

THE INDUCTEES

Yes

01. Jon Anderson (1968-2004: vocals, guitar)
02. Chris Squire (1968-2015: bass)
03. Tony Kaye (1968-1971; 1982-1994: keyboards)
04. Bill Bruford (1968-1972; 1990-1992: drums, King Crimson)
05. Steve Howe (1970-1981; 1990-1992; 1995-2004; 2008-Present: guitar; Asia, GTR)
06. Rick Wakeman (1971-1974; 1976-1980; 1990-1992; 1995-1997; 2002-2004: keyboards)
07. Alan White (1972-1981; 1982-2004; 2008–present: drums)
08. Trevor Rabin (1982-1994: guitar, keyboards)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 10.19.16 @ 03:50am


Peter Banks and Patrick Moraz being left out of induction.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 10.19.16 @ 04:42am


As I have stated numerous times before, Yes is my co-favorite band musically and my second favorite "prog" artist, overall. Although I am somewhat disappointed with this nominees' list, since neither The Moody Blues (#3), nor Duran Duran (#8) have yet received nominations, I will try to be positive about it, since Yes (#2) has received a third nomination, and Electric Light Orchestra (#12) has received their first nomination.

Once again, here is my revised list of favorite "prog" artists, in order:

01. Rush
02. Yes
03. The Moody Blues
04. Pink Floyd
05. Jethro Tull
06. Gentle Giant
07. King Crimson
08. Duran Duran
09. Talking Heads
10. Kansas
11. Alan Parsons Project
12. Electric Light Orchestra
13. Renaissance
14. Genesis
15. Peter Gabriel
16. Jefferson Airplane
17. Supertramp
18. Styx
19. Procol Harum
20. Asia

Yes has deserved induction into this venerable institution for more than two decades, let's get them inducted in 2017!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 10.20.16 @ 10:40am


FRL,

Thank you for adding the link to PROG magazine. Now, would you please add "Roll The Bones" to the list of essential Rush albums? Thank you, in advance for doing this.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 10.20.16 @ 11:38am


Out of the 19 nominees vying for induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2017, Yes is my #1 pick.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 10.20.16 @ 18:12pm


As I have said many times before, Yes is my co-favorite band musically, alongside Rush. Of the present list of deserving candidates for induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2017, Yes is first, followed by Electric Light Orchestra and then, The Zombies.

I am just utterly amazed that we are still arguing over Yes' s induction. In my honest opinion, Yes should have been inducted 20 years ago.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.21.16 @ 12:04pm


I think that we could go over the many reasons why Yes has not yet been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame, ad nauseum.

However, I think that their track record alone sets them on a much higher level than most of the other nominees this year.

Let's face basic facts: many of the Rock Hall's voters do not really like the "progressive rock," or "art rock" genres. This is quite unfortunate since much of the greatest and most memorable music of the past century has been created by artists from these two genres.

With that being said, thus far only Pink Floyd, Genesis, Rush, Peter Gabriel, Frank Zappa, Jefferson Airplane, Traffic, Talking Heads, Queen, Steely Dan, Chicago and Deep Purple have been inducted. The Grateful Dead are not really "prog," with the possible exception of "Terrapin Station" and most of the Door's work is not "prog" either, neither is Cream. Heart is "prog" adjacent. The Who have some "prog" features, but most of their songs are blues-based hard rock. Even the inductions of Pink Floyd and Genesis, probably had to do more with their popularity than their landmark recordings.

However, In April, 2013, a landmark event had occurred: the induction of Rush. This event would finally change how the Rock Hall would view "progressive rock." Immediately afterwards, Yes had been nominated for the first time, but they were not yet inducted. Then they were renominated last year, but had failed to be inducted again. This time, Yes will be inducted.

Yes has four of the greatest musicians who have ever graced the stage among their membership: guitarist Steve Howe, former member keyboard wizard, Rick Wakeman and drummer Bill Bruford and the late great bassist extraordinaire, Chris Squire. They also have a heck of a great drummer in Alan White and co- composer and lyricist "Prog" God former member Jon Anderson.

Yes has been a huge influence upon most progressive rock (past, present and future) artists, including Rush and many other artists, as well.

Yes has many great studio and live recordings amongst their discography.

Yes' music has endured and does not sound dated.

Yes is not afraid to experiment with new styles, but makes their music, uniquely .their own.

They have a large fan base which continues to attend their concerts and buy their recordings.

For the most part, Yes has a great deal of longevity.

For these many reasons, in addition to still many others, Yes deserves immediate induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2017.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.22.16 @ 14:29pm


I can see McCartney voting for 2Pac. He has worked with Kanye and said in a recent interview that he regularly listens to Jay-Z and has visited several Drake concerts. Maybe he is saying this to sound like a cool grandpa, but he seems generally interested in hip hop.

In the end, the people who have inducted N.W.A will now have to decide if 2Pac is among the five most worthy acts this year.

Posted by The_Claw on Saturday, 10.22.16 @ 15:35pm


As I have stated previously, "Yes is my co-favorite band musically and they have remained so, for over 35 consecutive years."

So, what attributes makes Yes' music so great, in my honest opinion?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.23.16 @ 11:09am


As I have stated previously, "Yes is my co-favorite band musically and they have remained so, for over 35 consecutive years."

So, what attributes makes Yes' music so great, in my honest opinion?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.23.16 @ 11:10am


Happy belated birthday to former member and co-founder of Yes: Jon Anderson. Thank you Jon, for the great music which you have given us over the past several decades. I hope that Steve and you are finally able to reconcile at the Rock Hall next year.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.28.16 @ 06:35am


Today is also the 20th anniversary of the release of "Keys To Ascension," arguably Yes' greatest live recording. The greatest version of 'The Revealing Science Of God,' Yes' masterpiece from "Tales From Topographic Oceans" and the greatest version of 'Onward,' from "Tormato" is represented here as well, as is the superlative 'Awaken,' from "Going For The One," my favorite version of my favorite Yes song. Also, "Close To The Edge," is represented by 'Siberian Khatru.'

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.28.16 @ 07:06am


It's a 'no' for Yes.

Posted by Ryan on Friday, 10.28.16 @ 08:30am


Today is also the 20th anniversary of the release of "Keys To Ascension," arguably Yes' greatest live recording. The greatest version of 'The Revealing Science Of God,' Yes' masterpiece from "Tales From Topographic Oceans" and the greatest version of 'Onward,' from "Tormato" is represented here as well, as is the superlative 'Awaken,' from "Going For The One," my favorite version of my favorite Yes song. Also, "Close To The Edge," is represented by 'Siberian Khatru.'
Of course, tried and true gems like 'Roundabout' from "Fragile" and "Starship Trooper" from "The Yes Album" join the other masterpieces. Also included is probably Yes' best cover version of Simon and Garfunkel's 'America,'
The fact that this particular concert was performed in San Luis Obispo, California over a 3 day period by the Classic Yes lineup (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Wakeman and White) is nothing short of remarkable. Although I happen to prefer the live tracks on this particular recording, Yes had also included two new epic tracks: "Be The One" and "That, That Is."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 10.28.16 @ 10:40am


For several years, I had been slightly disappointed with Yes, after the sub par "Big Generator" and the nearly disastrous "Union" and the horrific "Talk," I had been just about ready to give up on Yes. Unexpectedly, I had found "Keys To Ascension" while perusing the shelves of my local record store. I had been immediately intrigued after I had looked at the song list and the musicians involved.

Yesterday was the 20th anniversary of the release of "Keys To Ascension," arguably Yes' greatest live recording. The greatest version of 'The Revealing Science Of God,' Yes' masterpiece from "Tales From Topographic Oceans" and the greatest version of 'Onward,' from "Tormato" is represented here as well, as is the superlative 'Awaken,' from "Going For The One," This happens to be my favorite version of my favorite Yes song. Also, "Close To The Edge," is represented by 'Siberian Khatru.'

Of course, tried and true gems like 'Roundabout' from "Fragile" and 'Starship Trooper' from "The Yes Album" join the other masterpieces. Also included is probably Yes' best cover version of Simon and Garfunkel's 'America,'
The fact that this particular concert was performed in San Luis Obispo, California over a 3 day period by the Classic Yes lineup (Anderson, Squire, Howe, Wakeman and White) is nothing short of remarkable. Although I happen to prefer the live tracks on this particular recording, Yes had also included two new epic tracks: "Be The One" and "That, That Is." The new recordings are very good, but were slightly amorphous and underwhelming when compared to the magnificent "Mind Drive" and the rest of the extraordinary songs found on "Keys To Ascension 2."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.29.16 @ 12:14pm


in my honest opinion, "Magnification" is Yes' final studio masterpiece.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.29.16 @ 19:01pm


Once again, here are my 50 favorite songs by Yes:

I need to amend that previous list, slightly"

01. Awaken (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
02. We Agree (Magnification, 2001)
03. Mind Drive (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
04. Magnification (Symphonic Live, 2009)
05. Close To The Edge (Symphonic Live, 2009)
06. The Revealing Science Of God (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
07. Give Love Each Day (Magnification, 2001)
08. In The Presence Of (Symphonic Live, 2009)
09. Roundabout (Fragile, 1971)
10. Starship Trooper (The Yes Album, 1971)
11. And You And I (Symphonic Live, 2009)
12. South Side Of The Sky (Fragile, 1971)
13. Spirit Of Survival (Magnification, 2001)
14. Siberian Khatru (Close To The Edge, 1972)
15. The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
16. Heart Of The Sunrise (Fragile, 1971)
17. Yours Is No Disgrace (The Yes Album, 1971)
18. Turn Of The Century (Going For The One, 1977)
19. Perpetual Change (The Yes Album, 1971)
20. Don't Kill The Whale (Tormato, 1978)
21. The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus) (Yessongs, 1973)
22. Ritual (Symphonic Live, 2009)
23. Can You Imagine (Magnification, 2001)
24. I've Seen All Good People (Symphonic Live, 2009)
25. Owner Of A Lonely Heart (90125, 1983)
26. Machine Messiah (Drama, 1980)
27. Be The One (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
28. Onward (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
29. Wonderous Stories (Going For The One, 1977)
30. Homeworld (The Ladder, 1999)
31. The Ancient (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
32. Long Distance Runaround (Fragile, 1972)
33. Parallels (Going For The One, 1977)
34. To Be Over (Relayer, 1974)
35. The Gates Of Delirium (Symphonic Live, 2009)
36. Mood For A Day (Fragile, 1972)
37. Children Of Light (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
38. Foot Prints (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
39. Don't Go (Symphonic Live, 2009)
40. Survival (Yes, 1969)
41. Then (Time And A Word, 1970)
42. Going For The One (Going For The One, 1977)
43. Astral Traveller (Time And A Word, 1970)
44. Shoot High Aim Low (Big Generator, 1987)
45. Leave It (90125, 1983)
46. It Can Happen (90125, 1983)
47. Love Will Find A Way (Big Generator, 1987)
48. Lift Me Up (Union, 1991)
49. Changes (90125, 1983)
50. That That Is (Keys To Ascension, 1996)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.29.16 @ 23:15pm


Here are my favorite Yes studio albums, in order (including ABWH) from most favorite to least favorite:

01. Magnification (2001)
02. Tales From Topographic Oceans (1973)
03. Going For The One (1977)
04. Close To The Edge (1972)
05. Fragile (1972)
06. Keystudio (2001)
07. The Yes Album (1971)
08. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe (1989)
09. 90125 (1983)
10. The Ladder (1999)
11. Drama (1980)
12. Relayer (1974)
13. Fly From Here (2011)
14. Tormato (1978)
15. Big Generator (1987)
16. Time & A Word (1970)
17. Heaven & Earth (2014)
18. Yes (1969)
19. Union (1991)
20. Open Your Eyes (1998)
21. Talk (1993)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 10.29.16 @ 23:58pm


Here are my favorite Yes studio albums, in order (including ABWH) from most favorite to least favorite:

01. Magnification (2001)
02. Tales From Topographic Oceans (1973)
03. Going For The One (1977)
04. Close To The Edge (1972)
05. Fragile (1972)
06. Keystudio (2001)
07. The Yes Album (1971)
08. Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe (1989)
09. 90125 (1983)
10. The Ladder (1999)
11. Drama (1980)
12. Relayer (1974)
13. Fly From Here (2011)
14. Tormato (1978)
15. Big Generator (1987)
16. Time And A Word (1970)
17. Heaven & Earth (2014)
18. Yes (1969)
19. Union (1991)
20. Open Your Eyes (1998)
21. Talk (1994)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.30.16 @ 00:43am


Yes,

"Magnification" is my favorite Yes studio album. My favorite songs from "Magnification" are:

01. We Agree
02. Magnification
03. Give Love Each Day
04. In The Presence Of
05. Spirit Of Survival
06. Can You Imagine
07. Don't Go
08. Dreamtime
09. Time Is Time
10. Soft As A Dove

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.30.16 @ 03:15am


Once again, here are my 50 favorite songs by Yes:

I had needed to amend that previous list, slightly

01. Awaken (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
02. We Agree (Magnification, 2001)
03. Mind Drive (Keys To Ascension 2, 199
04. Magnification (Symphonic Live, 2009)
05. Close To The Edge (Symphonic Live, 2009)
06. The Revealing Science Of God (Keys To Ascension,
1996)
07. Give Love Each Day (Magnification, 2001)
08. In The Presence Of (Symphonic Live, 2009)
09. Roundabout (Fragile, 1971)
10. Starship Trooper (The Yes Album, 1971)
11. And You And I (Symphonic Live, 2009)
12. South Side Of The Sky (Fragile, 1971)
13. Spirit Of Survival (Magnification, 2001)
14. Siberian Khatru (Close To The Edge, 1972)
15. The Remembering (Tales From Topographic Oceans,
1973)
16. Heart Of The Sunrise (Fragile, 1971)
17. Yours Is No Disgrace (The Yes Album, 1971)
18. Turn Of The Century (Going For The One, 1977)
19. Perpetual Change (The Yes Album, 1971)
20. Don't Kill The Whale (Tormato, 1978)
21. The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus) (Yessongs, 1973)
22. Ritual (Symphonic Live, 2009)
23. Can You Imagine (Magnification, 2001)
24. I've Seen All Good People (Symphonic Live, 2009)
25. Owner Of A Lonely Heart (90125, 1983)
26. Machine Messiah (Drama, 1980)
27. Be The One (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
28. Onward (Keys To Ascension, 1996)
29. Wonderous Stories (Going For The One, 1977)
30. Homeworld (The Ladder, 1999)
31. The Ancient (Tales From Topographic Oceans, 1973)
32. Long Distance Runaround (Fragile, 1972)
33. Parallels (Going For The One, 1977)
34. To Be Over (Relayer, 1974)
35. The Gates Of Delirium (Symphonic Live, 2009)
36. Mood For A Day (Fragile, 1972)
37. Children Of Light (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
38. Foot Prints (Keys To Ascension 2, 1997)
39. Don't Go (Symphonic Live, 2009)
40. Survival (Yes, 1969)
41. Then (Time And A Word, 1970)
42. Going For The One (Going For The One, 1977)
43. Astral Traveller (Time And A Word, 1970)
44. Shoot High Aim Low (Big Generator, 1987)
45. Leave It (90125, 1983)
46. It Can Happen (90125, 1983)
47. Love Will Find A Way (Big Generator, 1987)
48. Lift Me Up (Union, 1991)
49. Changes (90125, 1983)
50. That That Is (Keys To Ascension, 1996)

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 10.30.16 @ 03:54am


In an earlier post, I had listed 12 of my Desert Island disks. I had found it rather surprising that out of those 12 disk sets, 1/3 of those were Yes recordings.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.1.16 @ 01:52am


Out of those 12 previously mentioned Desert Island disc sets, my Yes choices were the following:

001. Keys To Ascension (1996)
002. Keys To Ascension 2 (1997)
003. Magnification (2001)
004. Symphonic Live (2009)

So, why did I select those particular disc sets?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.1.16 @ 02:04am


For me ultimately, a true Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame artist, is one who is going to take the stage and play a musical instrument. I do not understand someone who takes the stage, lip synchs and dances. If I had really wanted to watch someone dance, I would prefer to watch a ballet, or perhaps a modern dance troupe, instead.

With respect to the artists whom I have chosen; this is essential.

Can someone please explain to me, why this has become so much more prevalent in recently years? What does this have to do with rock and roll? Who had started this abominable trend?

My favorite artists overall, are those artists who have learned how to absolutely master their musical instrument and who display this prowess, night after night, week after week, month after month, year after year. Under those circumstances, I can appreciate the concert.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.1.16 @ 10:16am


For me ultimately, a true Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame artist, is one who is going to take the stage and play a musical instrument. I do not understand someone who takes the stage, lip synchs and dances. If I had really wanted to watch someone dance, I would prefer to watch a ballet, or perhaps a modern dance troupe, instead.

With respect to the artists whom I have chosen; this is essential.

Can someone please explain to me, why this has become so much more prevalent in recently years? What does this have to do with rock and roll? Who had started this abominable trend?

My favorite artists overall, are those artists who have learned how to absolutely master their musical instruments and who display this prowess, night after night, week after week, month after month, year after year. Under those circumstances, I can definitely appreciate the concert. This also explains why I am drawn towards symphony orchestras, jazz ensembles and violin quartets. Keeping this is mind, most of my favorite artists are going to employ these particular methods. Therefore, as far as I am concerned, Yes and Rush are at the top of my lists for this particular reason. Each of the members of Rush and Yes are virtuosos. Now, this does not discount the other great artists on my list, but it explains my preferences. I had once atrempted to take a class in musical composition; it was extremely difficult, to say the least.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Tuesday, 11.1.16 @ 11:24am


I had written this statement several years ago; it had been met with sneering and derision.

Before I get into the many reasons why I feel that Rush is the greatest rock band of all time, I would like to discuss one of their biggest influences: Yes.

Now that Rush's recent induction has finally opened that door for more progressive rock bands to be inducted, I think that the Rush fan base should throw their support behind Yes.

Given that Yes and Rush are roughly as old as each other, (both were formed in 1968) I think that acknowledging Yes' worthiness of being enshrined within the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame should be discussed. So let's do this; shall we discuss Yes' accomplishments in great detail?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 11.3.16 @ 10:12am


I had discovered that there was an additional live album set by Yes which I have not yet purchased:

Progeny: Seven Shows from Seventy Two (2015)

It's a 14 cd version of Yes' "Close To The Edge" Tour.

As much as I thoroughly enjoy the music of Yes, I happen to think that this was a bit of overkill. I may instead opt for this version:

Progeny: Highlights From Seventy Two.

Which happens to be a 2 CD set.

This version is considerably less expensive, overall.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.4.16 @ 09:25am


Yes, Electric Light Orchestra and The Zombies are three of my choices from this particular list of nominees. In my honest opinion, the inductions of Yes and Electric Light Orchestra are essential for the recognition of more "progressive rock" artists' inductions into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. Let's get all three of these influential artists inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2017.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.11.16 @ 09:49am


Yes will also celebrate quite a few studio and live album anniversaries this month. At this time, I will mention the significant studio album anniversaries.

"Fragile" had been released on November 26, 1971.

"90125" had been released on November 7, 1983.

"Keys To Ascension 2" had been released on November 3, 1997.

"Open Your Eyes" had been released on November 24, 1997.



Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.13.16 @ 11:52am


"9012 Live: The Solos" had been released on November 7, 1985.


"In The Present: Live From Lyon" had been released on November 29, 2011.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.13.16 @ 20:37pm


Original Yes guitarist Peter Banks should have been included. Other than that, the Rock Hall got it right with which members of Yes to induct.

No Peter Banks with Yes, and no Nick Simper with Deep Purple.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 11.17.16 @ 21:19pm


The new issue of PROG magazine will discuss the making of "Tales From Topographic Oceans." December 7, 2016 will mark the 43rd anniversary of the release of Yes' controversial masterpiece.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 11.18.16 @ 08:52am


Interestingly, Yes are only at 27% of the vote on the FRL poll as of this writing.

Posted by V.F.T. on Tuesday, 11.22.16 @ 21:37pm


Today is the 45th anniversary of the release of "Fragile" in the United Kingdom. "Fragile" was the recording which had introduced me to the majestic music of Yes, almost 35 1/2 years ago.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 11.26.16 @ 10:43am


Enig,

I believe I was aware of that anniversary. Nov 1971 I remember as the British release of Fragile. When was it released in America? I forgot that date. I recall Feb. 1972. Let me know.

Posted by Ben on Sunday, 11.27.16 @ 09:16am


Ben,

According to Wikipedia, "Fragile" was released on January 4, 1972 in the United States.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 11.27.16 @ 11:26am


It is now December 1, 2016.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 12.1.16 @ 08:57am


I can certainly understand Rick Wakeman's frustration about Yes. In my honest opinion, Yes should have been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame decades ago. Yet, this is only Yes' third nomination for induction into the Rock Hall. It really is time to induct Yes into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 12.1.16 @ 09:41am


In the HBO 'Divorce' series season finale, a reference is made to "Tales From Topographic Oceans" by Yes, when Thomas Haden Church's character, Robert Dufresne introduces his daughter to Yes' music via 'Starship Trooper.'

Posted by Enigmaticus on Wednesday, 12.14.16 @ 08:37am


There has been another reference to Yes in the HBO series, "Divorced." Apparently, a snippet of 'Owner Of A Lnely Heart" is played by Robert Dufresne in an earlier episode, as well.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 12.18.16 @ 04:21am


My two most recent purchases include the Steven Wilson remixes of: Fragile" and "Tales From Topographic Oceans" by Yes.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Saturday, 12.24.16 @ 04:44am


Congratulations to Yes on their long overdue Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame induction. Thank yous go out to Steve Howe, Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, Alan White, Rick Wakeman, Trevor Rabin, Tony Kaye and of course, the late great Chris Squire. Overall, your music has been magnificent and you have had the distinction of being my co-favorite band musically for over 35 consecutive years. I am terribly sorry that you did not receive this honor when Chris Squire was alive. Of course, I had voted for your induction in 2013, 2015 and 2016. I had even said that Rush, Yes, The Moody Blues, King Crimson and Supertramp had deserved induction back in 2012. I sincerely hope that 4/5 of Classic Yes will be able to perform at the 2017 Rock Hall Induction ceremony.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Friday, 12.30.16 @ 01:18am


Congratulations are definitely in order for the "Voices For Yes" campaign which had undoubtedly helped to induct Yes into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. I think that you ladies and gentlemen did a magnificent job of bringing attention to Yes' many accomplishments over the past several decades.

However, I am slightly annoyed with their Power Point Presentation. Your faux pas regarding Rush, was slightly annoying, due to your description of Rush as a "heavy metal" band. Therefore I am compelled to repeat this statement for the umpeenth time once again, "Rush was not, has never been and will never be a "heavy metal" band, capiche?

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 01.1.17 @ 05:05am


I am very disappointed to find out that the extraordinarily talented keyboardist, Rick Wakeman, will not be attending Yes' Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony. Yes, I do agree that Yes should have been inducted years ago, long before Chris Squire's passing. Unfortunately, that did not happen, but the fact that the members of Rush and the "Voices For Yes" campaign have been instrumental in getting Yes on the nomination ballot is nothing short of astounding.

However, a reconciliation with the still living members of Yes would have been phenomenal and would have been a once in a lifetime event. For Yes fans, it would be something which they would definitely never forget. :-(

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 01.1.17 @ 17:35pm


Out of the 359 comments on this webpage, I have written approximately 138 of them, since February 3, 2013. And think that these conversations have helped.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.2.17 @ 12:49pm


Out of the 360 comments on this Yes webpage, I have written approximately 139 of them, since February 3, 2013. And I think that these conversations have helped. Of course, I will continue to make comments about Yes, The Moody Blues, Duran Duran and Sade well into the future.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.2.17 @ 15:22pm


Today is the 45th anniversary of the release of "Fragile." "Fragile was the first Yes album which had featured the Classic Yes Lineup of : Keyboard wizard Rick Wakeman, guitar virtuoso Steve Howe, hyperkinetic jazz drummer Bill Bruford, the late great bassist extraordinaire Chris Squire and of course, lead vocalist Jon Anderson.

In my honest opinion, the best song on "Fragile" is the gripping, chilling and haunting 'South Side Of The Sky, followed by the bright 'Heart Of The Sunrise,' then the enigmatic 'Roundabout,' then the energetic 'Long Distance Runaround,' then the mysterious, 'The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus),' then the beautiful 'Mood For A Day,' then the theatrical 'Cans and Brahms,' then the quirky 'We Have
Heaven,' followed by 'Five Percent for Nothing.' I have recently purchased the Steven Wilson remix of "Fragile." By the way, "Fragile" was the first studio album which had introduced me to the majesty of Yes over 35.5 years ago.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 01.5.17 @ 00:38am


Today is the 45th anniversary of the release of "Fragile." "Fragile was the first Yes album which had featured the Classic Yes Lineup of: Keyboard wizard Rick Wakeman, guitar virtuoso Steve Howe, hyperkinetic jazz drummer Bill Bruford, the late great bassist extraordinaire Chris Squire and of course, lead vocalist and creative force Jon Anderson. "Fragile" features 3 epic group songs ('Roundabout,' 'South Side Of The Sky and 'Heart Of The Sunrise,') and 5 song fragments by each member.

In my honest opinion, the best song on "Fragile" is the gripping, and chillingly haunting 'South Side Of The Sky, followed by the bright 'Heart Of The Sunrise,' then the enigmatic 'Roundabout,' then the energetic 'Long Distance Runaround,' then the mysterious, 'The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)' from Chris Squire, then the beautiful 'Mood For A Day' by Steve Howe, the theatrical 'Cans and Brahms,' by Rick Wakeman, then the quirky 'We Have Heaven,' by Jon Anderson, followed by 'Five Percent for Nothing' by Bill Bruford.

01. South Side Of The Sky
02. Heart Of The Sunrise
03. Roundabout
04. Long Distance Runaround
05. The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)
06. Mood For A Day
07. Cans And Brahms
08. We Have Heaven
09. Five Percent for Nothing

I have recently purchased the Steven Wilson remix of "Fragile." By the way, "Fragile" was the first studio album which had introduced me to the majesty of Yes over 35.5 years ago.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 01.5.17 @ 00:58am


Even my list of favorite Yes songs will soon have to be revised. Apparently, my order of favorite songs on "Fragile" has changed also. My previously favorite song from "Fragile" was the enigmatic 'Roundabout,' now it is the gripping and chillingly haunting, 'South Side Of The Sky.'

Posted by Enigmaticus on Thursday, 01.5.17 @ 09:20am


Enig,

South Side of the Sky is a terrific tune.I think my favorite on Fragile is Heart of the Sunrise. I actually have to check If South Side is on my PC. I own most of the Fragile tunes. I am so glad Yes have won their place in Rock n'Roll Hall of Fame. Thank goodness. I mean they were such a Major band of the 70s. I know several people who saw Yes in the 70s.

Posted by Ben on Sunday, 01.8.17 @ 05:33am


Ben,

Yes, I happen to enjoy 'Heart Of The Sunrise' quite a bit, also. Although, I happen to prefer 'South Side Of The Sky.'

Thank you, Yes' induction was absolutely necessary for a possible nomination and induction for The Moody Blues.

I think that many recent inductees, including the members of such groups as: Rush, Heart, Genesis, Chicago, Deep Purple, Yes, Electric Light Orchestra and Journey, plus the surviving members of Pink Floyd, Jefferson Airplane, The Doors and CSNY will form a bloc of votes for The Moody Blues and Procol Harum.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 01.8.17 @ 06:23am


Tomorrow is the 43rd anniversary of the North American release of "Tales From Topographic Oceans" by Yes. "T.F.T.O." has often been critically derided as the poster boy for overindulgent "progressive rock" music, since it's release. "Tales" only features 4 side long epics, 'The Revealing Science Of God (Dance Of The Dawn),' 'The Remembering (High The Memory),' 'The Ancient (Giants Under The Sun)' and 'Ritual (Nous Sommes du Soleil).' "Tales From Topographic Oceans" was greatly influenced by the lengthy footnote on p. 83 of Paramhansa Yoganada's "Autobiography of a Yogi." These included the four Shastric scriptures which are comprehensive treatises governing all aspects of social life, religious life and culture. Jon Anderson had been inspired by this footnote to create four epic pieces which happen to govern aspects of medicine, law, architecture, art, etc.

While a member of the U.S.N., stationed onboard my first aircraft carrier homeported in Yokosuka, Japan, I used to listen to "Tales From Topographic Oceans" on audio cassette. Ironically, it was while Yes was on tour in Japan 12 years earlier that Jon Anderson and Steve Howe had decided to create this monumental work. I happen to believe that Roger Dean's cover art on this work is probably his best work for Yes. My favorite coverwork by Roger Dean happens to be the cover artwork for Asia's second album, "Alpha," however.

As far as the epic songs are concerned, my favorite pieces are: 'The Revealing Science Of God,' which is best exemplified by the studio/live album, "Keys To Ascension" and 'Ritual,' which is best exemplified on "Symphonic Live." Other than those I also happen to thoroughly enjoy 'The Remembering' and 'The Ancient,' almost as much.

''The Revealing Science of God" contains a spoken chant at the very beginning, but the music that follows is nothing short of sublimely beautiful and extraordinary. It is my favorite piece from "Tales From Topographic Oceans."

'The Remembering" happens to also contain many beautiful parts which remind me of being on a sea voyage, courtesy of keyboard wizard, Rick Wakeman.

'The Ancient' is angular, jagged and somewhat noisy at the beginning, but a later section is quiet. Steve Howe's guitar work anchors this composition.

'The Ritual' focuses more on the extraordinary hyperkinetic drumming of Alan White and the energetic bass playing of the late great Chris Squire.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 01.8.17 @ 15:49pm


Why isn't Neil Peart joining Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson to induct Yes. That way we can say Rush is inducting Yes. I know he retired, but he doesn't have to perform.

Posted by Roy on Friday, 01.27.17 @ 20:47pm


Roy,

Neil is interested in spending most of his time with his young daughter and his wife. Whether he wishes to participate in this ceremony is entirely his prerogative.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.30.17 @ 01:11am


I have never understood the mindset of Rock music critics. In many instances, it defies logic. Such is the case with Dan Deluca, a music critic from Philadelphia who doesn't think that Yes deserves induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame. He even goes far enough to condescendingly state, "And once Canadian prog-trio Rush got in, in 2013, it was inevitable that the day would come when the RRHOF would say Yes." He even goes far enough to make disparaging remarks about Yes' lyrics.

Dan,

I would like to say the following: "It's time for you to wake up, whether you would like to believe it or not, prog is extremely important. Just because you may, or may not possess the ability to enjoy, or perhaps even comprehend this genre, does not make it any less noteworthy."

Philadelphia's late d.j. Ed Sciacky was a strong proponent of Yes' music. One hopes that the late d.j. will somehow know that his continued support of Yes had probably helped to open a berth for Yes' induction into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

Posted by Enigmaticus on Monday, 01.30.17 @ 01:40am


Bill Bruford didn't want to speak or perform with Yes, but he was there on stage. He will have to speak when King Crimson is inducted, because it will be his second induction.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 04.8.17 @ 05:16am


On my 51st birthday, over 4 yeas ago, I had written this:

Yes' chances of being inducted just went up exponentially. Rush's induction will finally open the door for "progressive rock."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.3.13 @ 13:14pm

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 04.16.17 @ 15:55pm


On my 51st birthday, over 4 years ago, I had written this:

Yes' chances of being inducted just went up exponentially. Rush's induction will finally open the door for "progressive rock."

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 02.3.13 @ 13:14pm

Let's see if I am correct!

Posted by Enigmaticus on Sunday, 04.16.17 @ 15:57pm


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