The Kingston Trio

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1983 (The 1984 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 2010 (ranked #16 in the Influences - Rock Era category) .


Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Tom Dooley (1958)

The Kingston Trio @ Wikipedia

The Kingston Trio Videos

Will The Kingston Trio be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

83 comments so far (post your own)

Biography by Bruce Eder
http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:aifexqq5ld6e~T1

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 01.30.08 @ 11:53am


John Stewart of Kingston Trio fame passes

January 21, 2008

John Stewart, a member of the Kingston Trio who wrote "Daydream Believer" for the Monkees and recorded more than 40 albums of his own, died Saturday from a stroke surrounded by his family in the same San Diego hospital where he was born. He was 68 years old.

Stewart, who spent most of his adult life living in Marin County, had a Top 10 hit in 1979 with "Gold," featuring guest artists Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac.

He first emerged as a songwriter when the original Kingston Trio recorded a couple of his songs. Stewart had formed a similarly styled folk group, the Cumberland Three. He joined the Kingston Trio in 1961, at the time one of the biggest selling acts in the world, to replace founding member Dave Guard. He quit the group in 1967.

With folk singing partner Buffy Ford, whom he would marry in 1975, Stewart hit the 1968 campaign trail for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, appearing with him at campaign rallies up until the night of his assassination in Los Angeles.

He released his classic "California Bloodlines" album in 1969, the first of seven solo albums to make the charts through 1980. His biggest solo hit was "Gold," from the "Bombs Away Dream Babies" album, which also produced lesser hits "Midnight Wind" and "Lost Her in the Sun." His songs were recorded by a number of artists, including Rosanne Cash, who scored a 1988 country hit with his "Runaway Train."

He continued to record over the years, releasing a number of recent albums on his own label and selling them through the Internet. He was working on a new album at the time of his death, with Buckingham playing guitar on the record. Recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, Stewart wrote a song for the new album titled "I Can't Drive Anymore."

Since 2000, Stewart and fellow former Kingston Trio member Nick Reynolds have held the Trio Fantasy Camp, where campers practice their favorite Kingston Trio song and perform the number with the two former group members. Stewart was visiting Reynolds in San Diego when he was stricken last Thursday in his hotel room.

Friends and family came from across the country on Friday to hold a hospital room vigil. Stewart is survived by his wife, Buffy; three children from his first marriage, Mikael of Camarillo (Ventura County), Jeremy of Mission Viejo (Orange County) and Amy of Alisa Viejo (Orange County); a son, Luke, of San Francisco, from his second marriage; and six grandchildren. Services are pending.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 02.6.08 @ 13:34pm


True Politcal Folk .. One of the FIRST and best...!! Where would we have been with out them....? Great players and writers
YES RHOF...!!!

Posted by mrxyz on Saturday, 08.30.08 @ 22:32pm


Kingston Trio Founder Nick Reynolds Passes at Age 75
October 3, 2008


Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the legendary '60s folk group the Kingston Trio, died Oct. 1 from complications following surgery. The beginning of a pop/folk movement in the late '50s that used banjos and acoustic guitars to back up tight vocal harmonies of traditional folk songs, the Kingston Trio had a huge hit with "Tom Dooley" in 1958 that led to multiple hit albums on Capitol and a long list of groups inspired by their style. At a time when acoustic music and beautiful vocals crowded the top of the charts, the Kingston Trio led the pack, selling millions of records and creating a genre. When the change in political climate and rise of rock and roll prompted the group to split, Reynolds retired the music industry in 1967 and turned his attention to ranching and selling antiques in Oregon. He moved to Southern California in the mid-80s and performed with a new version of the Kingston Trio for a decade beginning in 1988.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 10.16.08 @ 10:26am


Nick Reynolds, a founding member of the legendary '60s folk group the Kingston Trio, died Oct. 1 from complications following surgery.
RIP

Posted by mrxzy on Wednesday, 10.29.08 @ 22:13pm


Why are they not in...?
YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES and YES

Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 01.9.09 @ 17:31pm


only 80 vote..? and only 69% yes The Kingston Trio along with Peter Paul and Mary the parents of Folk rock ...political awareness ETC....from Dylan,Donavon, Cohen,Beatles,Mama and Papas, Springfield To u2..IF IT HAS A DEEP MESSAGE THEY ARE a BIG PART TO BLAME...

Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 01.16.09 @ 19:37pm


Originators of the Folk music craze of the 60's.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Sunday, 01.18.09 @ 13:55pm


Joe-Skee...we've got them to thank for "hootenanys"...LOL!!! But you are pretty much dead on.

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 01.18.09 @ 14:00pm


A no brainer.. Why they are not in is a wonder to me.? With out the likes of these real early political musicians, I doubt if Dylan ,The Boss or a U2 would even be around !

Posted by martind12 on Tuesday, 02.17.09 @ 02:41am


Phil Ochs
Joan Baez
Judy Collins
Laura Nyro
Janis Ian
Melanie
Peter, Paul and Mary
The Kingston Trio

Anthony DeCurtis was responsible for Leonard Cohen being inducted. Email him and tell him about the rest of the big folk names.

ADecurtis@aol.com

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 02.17.09 @ 03:24am


The 'ripple effect' of Kingston Trio music of the 50s and 60s are still being felt today.

Of course they should be in..........

It would be like leaving the Beatles off a British Invason list.........Get serious folks.

CC

Posted by CHUCK on Tuesday, 07.14.09 @ 15:26pm


From 1959 through 1962 they were the most popular vocal group in the world.

• For an incredible 2 year period from June, 1958, through July, 1960, they released seven albums. Every one of them went GOLD and became #1!!

• Their first album only took 4 days to record ... February 20 - 23, 1958 in Los Angeles at Capitol Records Studio B … an impossible feat by today’s standards.

• On December 7, 1959, “Billboard” listed FOUR Trio albums in the Top Ten for that week. Again, this was a feat unsurpassed to this day. Here We Go Again (#2), At Large (#4), The Kingston Trio (#7), From The Hungry I (#8).

• One of their albums was in the Top 100 for 4 1/2 years.

• Such groups as the Beach Boys, the Beatles, the Eagles, the Mamas and the Papas, and Kenny Rogers and Glen Campbell all credit the Trio with having been an influence in their music.

• Musically, we remember the decade of the Sixties in terms of the Beatles and those who followed them across the ocean. The USA quickly responded with the Beach Boys, The 4 Seasons, and Motown. Folk music grew up - or at least experienced adolescence - with Bob Dylan and the Byrds leading the pack.

And yet, as the decade of the Sixties came to a close it found that the Kingston Trio records continued to sell as sales more than doubled by the end of the decade proving the timeless quality of their music and style. Two records from its very first year outrank most of the heavyweights of that ten year span. However, statistical research from Billboard lists Sold Out as the eighth best selling album of the Sixties and String Along as number 12.

Posted by Bert Williams on Tuesday, 07.14.09 @ 21:08pm


nly 80 vote..? and only 69% yes The Kingston Trio along with Peter Paul and Mary the parents of Folk rock ...political awareness ETC....from Dylan,Donavon, Cohen,Beatles,Mama and Papas, Springfield To u2..IF IT HAS A DEEP MESSAGE THEY ARE a BIG PART TO BLAME...

Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 01.16.09 @ 19:37pm


As I have said many times b 4 YES YES YES

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 07.14.09 @ 23:44pm


If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be. This group has more than earned the honor of being enshrined. There record sales statistics alone should put them in the hall...not to mention that as late as the 90's two of the original three were still playing to SRO crowds nationwide touring 30 weeks a year.

Posted by mikey burns on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 15:28pm


"If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be."

Stevie Ray Vaughan

Posted by Philip on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 16:09pm


"If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be."

Deep Purple

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 16:51pm


If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be.

Alice Cooper

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 17:10pm


If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be.

Kiss

Posted by Brian on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 17:20pm


If ever there was a more deserving group or single musician that The Kingston Trio, I don't know who it could be.

Is this a chain letter?

Posted by Cheesecrop on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 18:19pm


No Cheesecrop, we are all commenting on groups who are more deserving than the Kingston Trio.

Posted by Brian on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 18:35pm


They had some good songs, and they were a big part of the 60's FOLK revival, but I don't really recall them having much influence on rock music...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 18:41pm


This same thing happened with The Troggs and Stryper. A lot of yes votes came in from the middle of nowhere.

Posted by Dude Man on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 21:53pm


don't really recall them having much influence on rock music...

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 18:41pm


Cohen does ??? LOL Some how Folk has become part of rock kinda like Blues did...

Posted by mrxyz on Wednesday, 07.15.09 @ 22:00pm


DIDN'T INFLUENCE ROCK MUSIC?????????

Do your homework guys!!!!!

Start talking with Lindsey Buckinham, Brian Wilson, Al Jardine, Chris Isaak, Bjorn Alveus and Marty Ballin !!!!!!!

Where do you think John Phillips got started?

Chuck

Posted by CHUCK on Thursday, 07.16.09 @ 00:11am


After you talk with them, chat with David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Shawn Colvin, John Sebastion and Timothy B Schmitt.

Posted by John August Lee on Thursday, 07.16.09 @ 01:54am


The Kingston Trio

Bob Shane
Dave Guard
Nick Reynolds
John Stewart
Roger Gambill

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 08.4.09 @ 20:43pm


Worried Man.

Posted by Telarock on Tuesday, 08.18.09 @ 13:16pm


Wouldn't it be great if they got IN this year...{SMILE}

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 09.15.09 @ 23:13pm


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a joke. When the Kingston Trio, Three Dog Night and the Grassroots aren't in it, I have no respect for the institution. I have been to Cleveland and have toured the physical pyramid there housing it and I left disillusioned b/c of all the omissions.

Posted by Rick Wynne on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 21:57pm


The Kingston Trio are not early influence. They qualify for the main performers category.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.21.10 @ 19:33pm


The Kingston Trio are not early influence. They qualify for the main performers category.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.21.10 @ 19:33pm

You are absolutely right Roy, the only reason they got in as Influences in Rock Hall Revisited is because Rock Hall Revisited's Influence category works a bit different than Cleveland's.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 08.27.10 @ 12:00pm


Rock Hall Revisited's Influence category vs. Cleveland's Early Influence category I mean

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 08.27.10 @ 12:01pm


Here are the Top 10 songs by the Kingston Trio according to digitaldreamdoor, I agree with it for the most part though I would personally put "Tom Dooley" a little higher:

01. Where Have All the Flowers Gone?
02. A Worried Man
03. The Tijuana Jail
04. Tom Dooley
05. Jane, Jane, Jane
06. Scotch & Soda
07. Scarlet Ribbons
08. Everglades
09. M.T.A.
10. Bad Man Blunder

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Friday, 08.27.10 @ 12:05pm


hi, the kingston trio had class guard went to stanford, nick and bob menlo-park. they had money, women, looks, and they were smart! don't forget them stripped shirts which were on the best-side of the tracks.

Posted by george karras on Tuesday, 11.1.11 @ 21:59pm


Important folksters but actually only "Tom Dooley" has really survived. Not enough for the Hall.

Posted by Robert on Tuesday, 11.15.11 @ 09:53am


Great songs? Sure. Influential? Of course. Rock and roll? Probably not.

Posted by Steve on Saturday, 12.31.11 @ 19:21pm


just love these old folk bands!
I am sure most agree they should be IN

Posted by Happy on Tuesday, 03.20.12 @ 00:36am


Steve wrote: Great songs? Sure. Influential? Of course. Rock and roll? Probably not.

Well, Steve...have you seen some of the artists they put in the HOF. Rock 'n' roll it is not.

The Kingston Trio should get in. Without them, perhaps no folk rock boom!

Posted by Jack on Saturday, 10.6.12 @ 14:09pm


The Kingston Trio: 1957-1967

01. Dave Guard (1957-1961; vocals, guitar, banjo)
02. Bob Shane (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo)
03. Nick Reynolds (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, conga drum, bongos)
04. John Stewart (1961-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 09.8.13 @ 09:41am


Despite the now-corny matching vertically-striped shirts (which were the inspiration for the Beach Boys vertically-striped shirts), the original Kingston Trio could harmonize and play acoustic instruments like nobody else. They not only sold a ton of record albums, these recordings (and their live performances) inspired more young people to pick up guitars than Elvis did. The group was THE most popular band from 1959-61, hands down. Their popularity sparked the first large scale concert tours in the industry. No Kingston Trio? Maybe no Dylan. No Byrds. No Beach Boys. No Mamas and Papas. No Simon and Garfunkel. No Eagles. And they were outstanding performers players and singers.

Posted by Jess on Monday, 03.10.14 @ 15:37pm


On musicians[edit]

Among the many other artists who cite the Kingston Trio as a formative influence in their musical careers are comedian, actor, and banjo player Steve Martin,[84][85] Lindsey Buckingham of Fleetwood Mac,[86] Timothy B. Schmit[87][88] of The Eagles, pioneering folk-rock artist Gram Parsons,[89] Stephen Stills and David Crosby of Crosby, Stills, and Nash,[90] The Beach Boys' Al Jardine,[91] Big Brother and the Holding Company founding member Peter Albin,[92] Denny Doherty of The Mamas and the Papas,[93] banjo master Tony Trischka,[94] pop groups ABBA[95] and The Bee Gees,[96] Jefferson Airplane founding members Marty Balin[97] and Paul Kantner,[98] Buffalo Springfield founding member Richie Furay,[99] Byrds co-founder Gene Clark,[100] roots musician and master mandolin player David Grisman,[101] singer-songwriters Tom Paxton,[77]Harry Chapin,[102] Jimmy Buffett,[103] Tim Buckley,[104] Steve Goodman[105] (composer of "The City Of New Orleans"), Steve Gillette,[106] Michael Smith[107] (composer of "The Dutchman"), and Shawn Colvin,[108] folk-rock group We Five co-founder Jerry Burgan,[109] folk and rock musician Jerry Yester,[110] and progressive jazz vocal group Manhattan Transfer.[

Posted by folkman on Wednesday, 05.7.14 @ 03:01am


KT is my all-time favorite. There were few who could play and sing tighter. Certain songs from the alblum ONCE UPON A TIME. It's three guys recorded live singing into a single mike and backed only with a standup base. THE SOUND WAS UNTOUCHED BY ENGINNERS and has many clunkers. But listen to these cuts and you'll understand my claim: Colors, Early Morning Rain, Get Away John, and One Too Many Mornings.

WITH THAT SAID, THERE IS NO WAY THEY SHOULD BE IN THE RACK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME.

They became yesterday's news, as we're the Beach Boys, by the British Invasion. Unlike the Beach Boys, who reinvented themselves with Good Vibrations, KT fans forced them to become a nostalgia act. Their one attempt to break mold, the alblum "Something Else", was met with a resounding thud by fans and critics alike. Their last alblum, an attempt to be psychedelicly hip, was a true flop.

Did they stand above most? Absolutely. We're they "rockers"? Please

Posted by Mrhandcar on Sunday, 02.22.15 @ 10:45am


Yesterday news, is what makes legends,,The sands of time speak I hear Yes,,, If not for them and a few others early bands,, Folk may not have become folk rock .....They put the political message into music....From Dylan to 2U and all in between .It is the message of human understanding and progress ... Beyond a silly love song..
Yes

Posted by truth on Sunday, 02.22.15 @ 12:09pm


Cornier than a Lawrence Welk Show/Sing Along with Mitch Miller marathon, these schmucks (along with the rest of the saccharine late '50s/early '60s folk vocal groups and the premanufactured teen idols like Fabian, Paul Anka, etc.) sunk top 40 music in the U.S. to some of the lowest depths ever experienced. Between The Kingston Trio's bland harmonization, utter lack of instrumental ability, and whiter-than-Wonder Bread look, they were musical anathema to those with functioning ears. One only needs to listen to John Stewart's hysterically bad Johnny Cash impression on Reverend Mr. Black or the annoying chorus of MTA to understand just how awful The Kingston Trio was in their heyday.

Citing their album sales and overall commercial success as reasons for enshrinement in the HOF is rather shallow. After all, it's innovation and influence that should be the main criteria. If you look at that list of names posted by folkman (which was cribbed from Wikipedia), most of them aren't all that significant, unless you count commercial success as the ultimate of musical excellence. Popularity in music is, unfortunately, not a meritocracy. If that were the case, the Billboard charts in the 1959-1963 timeframe would have been dominated by Ahmad Jamal and other jazzers (Thankfully, a few jazz names did crack the charts, like Vince Guaraldi with his recording of Cast Your Fate to the Wind in '63). Lest you think I'm a snob that despises pop music, I'll have you know that He's So Unusual by Cyndi Lauper is in my desert albums list, right next to more serious-minded albums like John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman and Chester & Lester.

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 02.22.15 @ 20:00pm


That should read "unless you count commercial success as the ultimate criterion for musical excellence"

Posted by Zach on Sunday, 02.22.15 @ 20:02pm


Zach
that is the most ridiculous thing I have ever read.... No they are not Coltrane but neither is Léonard Cohen ,Bob Dylan Mama an Papas or the Rolling Stones....
The Kingston Trio along with Peter Paul and Mary and a few others put folk and social conscious it to the main stream of teen America and Europe ... Nothing wrong about singing about that hot girl or guy, breakups loves etc.,,they had plenty of those songs and funny songs also..
They were the early messenger's of political awareness From "Where have all the Flowers Gone"
Scotch and Soda Tom Dooley... .
Wow funny how people forget how we got here in a good way Also they are very accomplish musicians.. Not forgetting Their back up Bass player Dave Wheat aka buckwheat .. In the beatnik days before Hippies or cool political correct and the a such.. He was #1 bassman .... and all of what the movement became .

Posted by truth on Sunday, 02.22.15 @ 22:40pm


Truth (A presumptuous name, if I may say so myself), I don't care about political messages in music, nor do I like them very much, so you're preaching to the wrong individual with that kind of claptrap. Music does not evolve or progress when songwriters choose new topics to write songs about; it's when musicians develop new ways of playing instruments and/or creating new sounds through instruments that a genre advances. All you have to do is look at the storied history of jazz to see the truth in that statement.

I won't dispute Dave Wheat's abilities as a bassist; anybody who plays with Chet Baker has to possess some chops. But don't kid yourself about the Kingston Trio's instrumental capabilities. They were students of the school of mindless guitar/banjo-strumming, which is par for the course with folkies. The Kingston Trio could have never reproduced something like Django Reinhardt's Nuages or T-Bone Walker's Call It Stormy Monday (But Tuesday is Just As Bad). Too complex for folkies to play. That's why you don't see any members of the Trio rank on respectable "most technically skilled/most influential" guitarists lists. You're free to enjoy them warts and all, but be realistic about their actual musical achievements and overall impact. Beyond commercializing folk, there was nothing they did that could be considered groundbreaking or innovative. They didn't fuse genres or create new ones. I love Glenn Miller, but it would be asinine to even suggest that he's as important to jazz as contemporaries like Count Basie and Fats Waller.

The Kingston Trio just don't have that multigenerational appeal or timelessness like other acts of the '50s do. I will concede that the Kingstons were popular in their time, but so were Perry Como and The Osmonds, and they haven't stood the test of time any better, either. Their albums now sit collecting dust and mold at thrift stores, along with other antiquated musical nonsense.

Topical songs have a way of dating themselves quickly. World issues are simply too complicated to be reduced to three-minute ditties, especially maudlin dreck like Where Have All the Flowers Gone. Give me virtuosity, technical ability, complex chord progressions/rhythms/harmonies/melodies, vocal range, and vocal phrasing over proselytizing masquerading as singing any day.

In fact, let me help you out by linking an example of something that really stands the test of time:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qc3VaXtW5M

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 00:28am


Phil Ochs, Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Peter, Paul and Mary and The Kingston Trio should all be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and that's where it should stop with Folk in the Rock Hall!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 07:38am


Zach
I would agree that they didn't do jazz nor anything close Neither did 70% of the bands in the hall.. I have to disagree on lyrics and social awareness not being important in the evolution of rock....They were not Dylan but if folk have not made it into mainstream unlikely rock would not be what it is many musicians took from the lead Even Martin made a Kingston Trio Guitar,,, RRH seems to think folk has its place Leonard Cohen an Joanie Michelle comes to mind ... Also Martin Guitars thought they were important enough to create a Kingston Trio guitar..

Posted by truth on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 09:45am


Roy,

I agree with everyone on your list as a starter except Phil Ochs. There are too many other artist that I feel have a higher level of influence then he has. What about Melanie, John Prine, Steve Goodman and Tom Paxton? Then there are singer - songwriters such as Gordon Lightfoot, Don Mac Clean, Kenny Loggins and Dan Fogelberg. And what about Country artists such as Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Emmylou Harris, Kris Kristoffersen, David Allan Coe and Kenny Rogers?


Zach,

Politics is short lived? The Jungle by Upton Sinclair was written to inform the public about the conditions that immigrants had to endure and The Wizard of Oz is a Populist allegory. Both are considered classics. Many nursery rhymes and songs are political and have survived for centuries.

Were you aware that early classic musicians thought enough of folk music to record and preserve it? There are different levels of folk music so don't go confusing the participatory level as being the totality of the genre. Some of it involves some fairly complex chording that is deceptively simple. What genre do you think explored complex variations on harmony and passed it down from generation to generation? You do realize that classical music was built on folk music - don't you?

When I was a kid we were taught the Kingston Trio variations of Where Have All The Flowers Gone? and 500 Miles at day camp. And for the record we were also taught some more complex harmony styles.

By the way Pete Seeger is not dreck. I have never heard a musician spoken of with such reverence as this man - and unlike you this was from people who actually were musically knowlegeable and taught music.

Posted by Zuzu on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 11:58am


Truth,

Please learn to read an entire post before you respond to it. I said the evolution of music as an overall art form, not the evolution of rock 'n roll. I'll play along just to make it fair dor you. I can point to many genres and styles of rock 'n roll that did not need political proselytizing to succeed and owe nothing to folkies - rockabilly, Motown, Phil Spector's wall of sound, new wave, garage, doo wop, Stax and Philly soul, British Invasion, electronica, early punk, etc. Unlike folk, rock isn't a largely monolithic genre that mostly sounds the same with each passing decade. Topical songs are only a small part of rock music and should not be confused for actual progress in the genre.

Martin naming a guitar after the Kingston Trio had more to do with them featuring the guitars so prominently on their album covers (which amounted to little more than advertising) and less to do with being able to play them competently.

Zuzu,

I've never read The Jungle, but I have read and seen the novel and film versions of The Wizard of Oz. Never did it cross my mind that it was a populist allegory. I think I can safely speak for most people that it's a charming fantasy story that has stood the test of time not because of any alleged allegory, but because of its universal themes, its colorful characters, and its soundtrack (the movie, obviously).

Times change, and so do the events that surround them. There's absolutely nothing you can learn from a protest or counter-protest song that you can't already learn in a documentary, news broadcast, or history book. My intense loathing of political music has been documented elsewhere on FRL, so refer to the appropriate pages if you must know my full reasons.

I'm not a musician nor do I pretend to understand how to read music, but I know what sounds interesting and complicated. When I hear Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker play Salt Peanuts, I hear something that sounds like it came from another universe and could not be replicated by 99% of the human population. When I hear the shrill and annoying Little Boxes by Malvina Reynolds, I hear something so childishly simplistic that any fool could learn it in no time at all.

As for harmonically complex structures, you'd have to check out the Four Freshmen for that. They owe nothing to folk. Theirs is a sound that blends jazz and traditional pop. Where do you think Brian Wilson learned about close harmony?

While classical music may have been influenced by folk, I can guarantee you that classical evolved far beyond that stage to become an animal all its own. I hear nothing in Moonlight Sonata or Rhapsody in Blue that sounds even remotely folk-esque.

I pity you and your campmates for having to be taught that juvenile nonsense. It makes me all the more grateful that I did not grow up when that fad was still alive. Too bad your instructors didn't have the foresight to teach you bebop, swing, surf, or something else more complex.

You obviously have a limited worldview of music if you believe no other musician has been spoken of in more glowing terms that Pete Seeger (Good riddance). He's praised not for having any outstanding musicianship or vocal range, but for his myopic lyrics (Flowers die from naturally ocurring phenonema, so the anology is flawed) and supposed insight into world affairs. He's definitely no Earl Scruggs or Johnny St Cyr (From Louis Armstrong's Hot Five) as far as banjo mastery is concerned. For Seeger, the banjo was a prop to accompany his awful voice and make him look authentic, even though he was a Noo Yawker by birth. I've read and heard more positive comments about Les Paul, Jimi Hendrix, Charlie Parker, Kraftwerk, and others who, you know, actually changed the sound of music and not just the lyrics.

In closing, I'm sorry for you if you find it repugnant that someone would actually evaluate music based on its instrumentation and how well musicians play, instead of collateral lyrics. Go watch that Ahmad Jamal video I linked if you want something musically complex.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 13:04pm


Zach,

I don't find what you say repugnant. I am scared by the notion of a generation growing up that is so uneducated in the arts. It shows in the lack of depth of your replies. You haven't had any kind of artistic education have you (musical, visual or theatrical)? Did you have any art or music appreciation?

I was reading an article the other day in which the author said that people no longer sing? It shows in the quality of music today. How do you think it will be in 30 or 50 years from now.

Zach your taste are not my taste - so no I do not want to check out what you suggest.

Posted by Zuzu on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 17:53pm


Zuzu,

I ignore the bulk of contemporary music, unless it is a genre or style I already enjoy, so don't shove that "Today's kids don't know real music" junk down my throat. Work, family, and other commitments/hobbies are too important for me to pay much attention to current pop culture.

Your insinuation that one needs to take music appreciation courses in order to truly appreciate music is rather silly. It's akin to suggesting one must go to film school to appreciate film. I appreciate any art form based on its own merits, not for supposed meanings or any of that pseudointellectual nonsense. I advocate the art for art's sake theory, which I have found so far to be the most logical and foolproof way of evaluating any art. Without music or good voices, lyrics are merely words on paper.

Edgar Allan Poe, who knew more about writing poetry than 100 literature professors put together, aptly stated in his essay The Poetic Principle:

"To recapitulate, then:—I would define, in brief, the Poetry of words as The Rhythmical Creation of Beauty. Its sole arbiter is Taste. With the Intellect or with the Conscience, it has only collateral relations. Unless incidentally, it has no concern whatever either with Duty or with Truth."

Ditto for music, film, and other art forms as well.

I care about vocal phrasing, technical ability, virtuosity, interesting/unique/complex chord progressions, vocal range, and other aesthetic qualities that actually go into the making of a song. As much as this might offend you, music can be entirely instrumental and doesn't have to depend on lyrics to find acclaim. I appreciate a fine singing voice as much as the next person, but by and large I listen to music for how the instruments sound and are played. Even with vocal music, I listen to how singers phrase lyrics and how much emotion they deliver them with, not for lyrical content and meaning. Vocalese and scat are perfect forms of vocal music where singers come up with fascinating methods of using voices as instruments.

In closing, I am glad you're choosing to leave this debate. I, too, will bow out since there's nothing left to contend or discuss. Too bad you choose to ignore a master of space, rhythm, and melody like Ahmad Jamal in favor of your honky folkies. I just prefer my musical menu to be as diverse and high-quality as possible.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 02.23.15 @ 21:03pm


I can point to many genres and styles of rock 'n roll that did not need political proselytizing to succeed and owe nothing to folkies - rockabilly, Motown, Phil Spector's wall of sound, new wave, garage, doo wop, Stax and Philly soul, British Invasion,

Zach
-------------------------------------------------
When Spector did his music ya new it was spector or someone copying it

As far as the Brits not doing social/political undertones in their music....lol All I can say is.. "you got to be kidding???"..


As far as Martin creating a guitar after them How would you know ??..... Seems to me they already had all the free advertising..

See ya next life time maybe
Nice try ....know I know you are kidding

Nice try ....know I know you are kidding
TTL

Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 00:24am


Last thought As far as Buckwheat /Dave Wheat..
He was a true do it my way go with the flow type of guy.. He was a beatnik type of teacher and learner of music.. It was all about the sound.. Big on sound waves and their subtle vibs and harmonic tones, Playing with the open spaces of true space .. To speak of just a few of his points of views...One thing he did so well was taught you to listen and hear.. He performed with the cats he dug including the Kingston Trio .. If he didn't dig it.. he wouldn't do it.. He is/was his own man ... RIP Mr Wheat..

Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 00:42am


Truth, you seriously need to work on your sentence structure and overall coherency. I honestly can't tell what point, if any, you're trying to make with that first one-liner about Phil Spector.

I'd also recommend that you improve your reading comprehension. Nowhere did I say that sociopolitical messages were not in any of the music recorded by British Invasion-era bands. What I said was those bands did not owe their success and musical innovations primarily to sociopolitical proselytizing. That The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Kinks, The Dave Clark Five, Herman's Hermits, and others may have recorded a few political songs doesn't change the fact that that wasn't their main game. Protest songs were the "in" thing to do at the time, but have now thankfully withered away with the passage of time because the issues of that time are either irrelevant now or have already been resolved. Crap like Ballad of the Green Berets and Fixin'-to-Die Rag are ancient history by this point. No need to listen to songs about events that have long passed, especially when you can get a fuller picture of said events by consulting the proper sources (history books, documentaries, archived news reports, interviews with eyewitnesses/direct participants, etc.). Let music be music, not a tool for propaganda.

The tidbit I shared regarding the reason Martin dedicated a guitar to the Kingston Trio is common knowledge. I don't know of any respected or major guitarists that play those KT Martins. Let's face it, they're not exactly Les Paul Gibsons when it comes to name recognition and being played by the cream of the crop.

Goodbye and good riddance.

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 00:56am


LOL Zach for someone that did understand what I said.. You did a good job not understanding.. As far as history books and things of such matters.. When the music hits the streets that was what many were thinking.. You can learn a lot about a time in space through music.. I am not a big Civil War music lover.. but you can tell where many of the heads were at like it or not..
I can't think of any great well known musician performing the Eric Clapton Fender model other than Eric lol . But if anyone would know I am sure it could be you..
Buckwheat loved "low-Hertz tones" If you listen real hard you may hear them form time to time in Their recordings among other things.
enjoy

Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 01:15am


LOL Zach for someone that did understand what I said.. You did a good job not understanding.. As far as history books and things of such matters.. When the music hits the streets that was what many were thinking.. You can learn a lot about a time in space through music.. I am not a big Civil War music lover.. but you can tell where many of the heads were at like it or not..
I can't think of any great well known musician performing the Eric Clapton Fender model other than Eric lol . But if anyone would know I am sure it could be you..
Buckwheat loved "low-Hertz tones" If you listen real hard you may hear them form time to time in Their recordings among other things.
enjoy

Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 01:15am


I would think Fairport Convention has a case for the Hall

Posted by Paul in KY on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 07:12am


Fairport Convention too!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 07:38am


Not really, truth. Songs are too short and narrow-minded to really delve into the subtleties, underlying causes, and other facets related to such complicated events. As an example, suggesting that the creaky song Ohio is more informative about the shootings at Kent State than an actual eyewitness testimony or archival news broadcast is absurd. Neil (Squeal) wasn't even present at the tragedy. Again, I reiterate: There's absolutely nothing you can ascertain from a whiny protest song that cannot already be acquired through the proper historical sources. Funny how no one has even debated that point. Perhaps it's because they unconsciously know it's self-evident logic that cannot be refuted :)

Perhaps there aren't as many notable Clapton Stratocaster players as there are Les Paul Gibson players because the EC Strat model has only existed for close to 27 years. Even so, why bother mentioning Clapton when I said nothing about him in the first place?

BTW, just to illustrate how significant the Gibson LP (or any LP model, for that matter) is, here's a list of some of the notables who've played them (That is, besides Les Paul, who is in a category of his own):

Duane Allman, Jeff Beck, Marc Bolan, Eric Clapton, Steve Clark (Def Leppard), Al Di Meola, The Edge, Ace Frehley, Billy Gibbons, Jimi Hendrix, Lightnin' Hopkins (His last guitar was an LP Silverburst), Steve Howe (Yes, Asia), Freddie King, Bob Marley, John McLaughlin (Mahavishnu Orchestra), Gary Moore (Thin Lizzy), Roy Orbison, Jimmy Page, Joe Perry, Carl Perkins, Keith Richards, Mick Ronson (played with David Bowie in his glam rock years), Neal Schon, Slash, Hubert Sumlin (played with Howlin' Wolf, among other bluesmen), Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Pete Townshend, Eddie Van Halen, Muddy Waters (played an LP Goldtop at one point), Johnny Winter.

Lots of heavy hitters there. I'd like to see you come up with a comparable list of Kingston Trio Martin players.

As I said before, you'll get no argument from me on David "Buck" Wheat's bass playing techniques. He was the only listenable part of the Kingston Trio. But if you want to hear a bassist who can really bend notes and sound out-of-this-world, check out Jimmy Woode on this performance of Satin Doll with Clark Terry:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GivaZbLzaoQ

Posted by Zach on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 15:02pm


I didn't know that the Kingston trio had many protest songs ???????????
As far as Les Paul model there is the Jimmy Page Les Paul Tribute Model and a Slash to name just a few .... Les Paul is a model...designed partly by Les Paul ...
Just as the martin D-28 guitar, a 0-18T is a model think they had another one also with a tribute to them ..Same as Clapton and Page a tribute models ... I don't think there is Mr Stratocaster that invented the Stratocaster lol

Also I did know les Paul was consider a rock blues or folk guitar man though he can play all styles Apples and oranges
As far as the trio Singing I would say lots of feel and great vocals..
I must say Scotch and Soda is a nice jazzy type of song ..They hit it nice...Considering they are "folk Players '

Oh well What would Martin and millions of fans Plus lots of other musician that have cited them as influence know... When you listen to the Beatles" Live" in the early 60's then the Kingston trio live late 50's yearly 60's.. I would say the Trio were a little better players and Singers.. I like the Beatles songs better for the most part . But that is subjective ,,,
I agree your right Jazz player are better player for the most part.. Lot's of them can't play rock right lol



Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 22:01pm


I just looked up Martin.. There is a Eric Clapton tribute model The 000-28 Madagascar.. Funny like the Trio a "tribute model" but the Trio have/had 2 or 3 " Martin tribute models" Clapton Must be livid .. Hmmmm where is the Eric Clapton Model "tribute model" for Jimmy Page model...???? All we can do is hope....

Posted by truth on Tuesday, 02.24.15 @ 22:36pm


Hope this is the last time I ever have to respond to one of your asinine posts, so here we go.

I was referring to protest songs in a general sense, as opposed to those from a specific artist. I know The Kingston Trio didn't record as many sociopolitical songs as less commercial folkies. I don't care whether I agree with the message or not, they're still totally unnecessary in music. Let art speak for itself (In this case, art being instrumental virtuosity, vocal range, unique vocal techniques, long solos, interplay amongst different types of instruments, interesting chord changes/patterns, strong rhythms, etc.).

I've listened to Scotch and Soda. Drab doesn't even begin to describe the vocals on display. Not enough passion or interesting vocal techniques to hold my interest.

Highly doubt the Kingston Trio fanbase these days numbers into the millions. They're not a transcendent act that introduced a completely new genre of music, rewrote the rules of a genre or style, or are so overwhelmingly popular that it would be foolish to ignore them. They're a white-bread, cornball act that sold lots of of albums but innovated nothing, unless being commercially successful is the only barometer by which you judge an act's importance. There is a perfectly fine reason why their albums are primarily thrift store fodder these days. I'll concede the point that they did make folk music commercially viable, but you must remember that the 1959-1963 timeframe was largely a washout for American popular music. The success of dreck like Venus, Lonely Boy, Michael, The Lion Sleeps Tonight, Roses Are Red (My Love), and It's My Party (all of which were #1 Billboard pop singles) bears this point out. Mediocrity was the order of the day, and pop-folk was a major reason for American popular music being so saccharine and awful during this timeframe.

As for their disciples, I see no one on Wiki's list (other than The Beach Boys, ABBA, and maybe the Bee Gees, and even with those three, you can't say that they owe their overall sound/significance to the Kingston Trio) that strikes me as being incredibly important to the development of music as an overall art form. The Eagles, Stevie Nicks/Lindsey Buckingham-era Fleetwood Mac, Harry Chapin, and Jimmy Buffett aren't exactly heavy hitters in the grand scheme of things. Again, they're only important if commercial success is your sole criterion for judging an act's historical significance.

Whether jazz musicians can perform rock 'n roll songs competently is entirely irrelevant, but such a foolish statement deserves to be recognized for its utter ignorance.

In closing, I'd be a lot more forgiving of the Kingston Trio if they at least possessed some degree of camp value, like Tiny Tim or Liberace, but I'm afraid the Kingstons don't even have that going for them.

Posted by Zach on Saturday, 03.7.15 @ 22:42pm


In closing, I'd be a lot more forgiving of the Kingston Trio if they at least possessed some degree of camp value, like Tiny Tim or Liberace, but I'm afraid the Kingstons don't even have that going for them.


Posted by Zach


Is this guy Zach feeling ok ? Planet earth to Zach can you read me over? Wow

Posted by groundcontrol on Sunday, 03.15.15 @ 17:18pm


!959 hits


What'd I Say Ray Charles
2 I Only Have Eyes For You Flamingos
3 Mack The Knife Bobby Darin
4 There Goes My Baby Drifters
5 Shout Isley Brothers
6 Kansas City Wilbert Harrison
7 Poison Ivy Coasters
8 Money Barrett Strong
9 Love Potion No. 9 Clovers
10 You're So Fine Falcons
11 Handy Man Jimmy Jones
12 Sea Of Love Phil Phillips with the Twilights
13 Baby What You Want Me To Do Jimmy Reed
14 A Teenager In Love Dion & the Belmonts
15 I'm Ready Fats Domino
16 Charlie Brown Coasters
17 Back In The U.S.A. Chuck Berry
18 Come Softly To Me Fleetwoods
19 Beyond The Sea Bobby Darin
20 Dedicated To The One I Love Shirelles
21 Dream Lover Bobby Darin
22 It's Late Ricky Nelson
23 Sleep Walk Santo & Johnny
24 Sweet Nothin's Brenda Lee
25 Fannie Mae Buster Brown
26 Hey Little Girl Dee Clark
27 Harlem Nocturne Viscounts
28 A Big Hunk O' Love Elvis Presley
29 Somethin' Else Eddie Cochran
30 Little Queenie

Posted by groundcontrol on Sunday, 03.15.15 @ 17:50pm


1960
I We say more than the truth on hits ..wow

1 Will You Love Me Tomorrow Shirelles
2 Georgia On My Mind Ray Charles
3 Only The Lonely Roy Orbison
4 Let's Go, Let's Go, Let's Go Hank Ballard & the Midnighters
5 Stay Maurice Williams & the Zodiacs
6 Chain Gang Sam Cooke
7 Save The Last Dance For Me Drifters
8 Shop Around Miracles
9 The Twist Chubby Checker
10 Cathy's Clown Everly Brothers
11 Shakin' All Over Johnny Kidd & the Pirates
12 Spoonful Howlin' Wolf
13 Spanish Harlem Ben E. King
14 Walk--Don't Run Ventures
15 Wonderful World Sam Cooke
16 New Orleans Gary U.S. Bonds
17 At Last Etta James
18 He Will Break Your Heart Jerry Butler
19 It's Now Or Never Elvis Presley
20 I'm Sorry Brenda Lee
21 When Will I Be Loved Everly Brothers
22 Gee Whiz Carla Thomas
23 This Magic Moment Drifters
24 Doggin' Around Jackie Wilson
25 Fingerpoppin' Time Hank Ballard & the Midnighters
26 Back Door Man Howlin' Wolf
27 Please Come Home For Christmas Charles Brown
28 Stuck On You Elvis Presley
29 Are You Lonesome Tonight Elvis Presley
30 Blue Angel Roy Orbison

Posted by groundcontrol on Sunday, 03.15.15 @ 17:52pm


You have a problem with the camp aesthetic? I see nothing wrong with admiring Liberace and Tiny Tim. Both were flamboyant, yet talented figures who made a lot of positive music, something we could use more of in these cynical, snark-ridden times. I can simultaneously appreciate those two alongside more critically esteemed acts like Thelonious Monk and Muddy Waters.

Not sure what point you're trying to make, if any, with those lists you posted. Lots of great songs, though.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 01:15am


Zach Why did I post those song because you said



but you must remember that the 1959-1963 timeframe was largely a washout for American popular music. The success of dreck like Venus, Lonely Boy, Michael, The Lion Sleeps Tonight, Roses Are Red (My Love), and It's My Party (all of which were #1 Billboard pop singles) bears this point out. Mediocrity was the order of the day, and pop-folk was a major reason for American popular music being so saccharine and awful during this timeframe


Are you feeling OK ...

Posted by groundcontrol on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 14:13pm


"I was referring to protest songs in a general sense, as opposed to those from a specific artist. I know The Kingston Trio didn't record as many sociopolitical songs as less commercial folkies. I don't care whether I agree with the message or not, they're still totally unnecessary in music. Let art speak for itself (In this case, art being instrumental virtuosity, vocal range, unique vocal techniques, long solos, interplay amongst different types of instruments, interesting chord changes/patterns, strong rhythms, etc.)."

Awesome. Now Zach is telling us what constitutes art and what does not. Or at least what is necessary in art and what is not. Seriously?

Also, to say that Nicks/Buckingham-era Fleetwood Mac is only significant from a commercial perspective and nothing shows a lack of understanding of what Buckingham especially was doing, especially from a production standpoint. The guy remains a genius in many respects.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 14:38pm


Sorry, typo. That last sentence should read:

Also, to say that Nicks/Buckingham-era Fleetwood Mac is only significant from a commercial perspective and nothing else shows a lack of understanding of what Buckingham was doing, especially from a production standpoint. The guy remains a genius in many respects, especially in the studio.

Posted by Dezmond on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 14:40pm


To have a impact on others music does not mean other "artist" need to publicly state it .Even though many have with the KT....If you sell lots of records you have made a ripple in music,, Musician listen to music it affects them just like all humans

It is obvious the Kingston Trio had a big effect on music . Martin guitar would not of made tribute guitars if they didn't think so.. Folk is as much rock as Rap is

Posted by groundcontroll on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 15:05pm


John Stewart better be included in the induction!!!!


The Kingston Trio: 1957-1967

01. Dave Guard (1957-1961; vocals, guitar, banjo)
02. Bob Shane (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo)
03. Nick Reynolds (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, conga drum, bongos)
04. John Stewart (1961-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 17:35pm


John Stewart wrote Daydream Believer for the Monkees. His biggest solo hit was Gold. He doesn't have a page here yet.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 21:03pm


I see reading comprehension is not your strongest suit, groundcontrol. Otherwise you would have noticed the use of the word "largely" in my description, which is to say that there was quality popular music being produced in that timeframe (1959-1963), but it was unfortunately outnumbered by a lot of bad qdreck like the teen idols, the pop folk vocal groups, Andy Williams, and easy listening composers like Percy Faith and Lawrence Welk. Thankfully, history has relegated that dross to the dusty bins of thrift stores, while the gold (Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, Roy Orbison, etc.) had lasting influence and impact and continues to find new audiences. And I haven't even brought up all the great jazz musicians that were creating great works then which largely fell outside of the mainstream in that era, albeit with some exceptions (Dave Brubeck's Take Five being an obvious case). You also neglected to acknlowedge that I did praise those lists you shared. But those songs were exceptions to the norm of that period. I would never berate such timeless classics as Georgia on My Mind, At Last, Mack the Knife, Walk-Don't Run, Wonderful World, Back Door Man, and Shout. They represent the top echelon of popular music of that timeframe.

So far the acolytes of The Kingston Trio haven't convinced me that their precious folkies had any real impact beyond commercial success and helping to create a dark period in American popular music. Yeah, they may have made folk commercially viable, but it takes more than that to be influential AND (more importantly) innovative. And I still haven't found any important guitarists who play, or have played, those KT Martins.

And now I see my eternal nemesis Dezmond has chimed in with his two cents. My intense loathing of proselytizing in music (or any artform) is no secret. After all, I am a strict proponent of aestheticism (a.k.a art for art's sake). Although I take great pains to differentiate my opinions from facts, I find that this school of thought is the most logical, foolproof, and accurate measure of art's merit. The proper forums already exist for addressing and solving social problems. What is so difficult to comprehend about that logic, especially when it is so blatantly obvious? Politics are politics and entertainment is entertainment. Never should they intersect. The excerpts I've shared from Edgar Allan Poe's The Poetic Principle perfectly encapsulate what I have advocated here. Argue with my ideas as much as you want, but the words of a literary giant like Poe are trump cards you just can't overcome. It would be akin to the tale of Sisyphus attempting to roll that boulder uphill.

The word "genius" is so abused and overused that unless one presents compelling evidence, I cannot accept one's attempt to convince me that some Southern California pop-rock schlockmeister is the equivalent of George Gershwin, Miles Davis (I'll give him his due, even though I'm not particularly crazy about his music), Django Reinhardt, Les Paul, Kraftwerk, and other objective, legitimate musical geniuses. The whole concept of a musical genius should be limited to those who create a radical shift in a given genre/style of music (Charlie Parker, The Beatles) or combine disparate styles to make something entirely new (Bob Wills) or those who are so overwhelmingly innovative in playing a particular instrument or (Little Walter, Jimi Hendrix) that a majority of succeeding names playing the same instrument take direct influence from the new sounds and techniques pioneered. One must avoid the temptation to overload the list of legit musical geniuses because that would dilute the entire concept of musical genius. Genius does not come in droves, but rather in isolated cases or small groups. These are the movers and shakers that guide a genre, multiple genres, or the entire artform of music towards new directions in sound, instrumentation, techniques, and other aesthetic qualities.

Posted by Zach on Monday, 03.16.15 @ 23:34pm


Zach, I am not sure why you call me a nemesis. I just happen to disagree with you. Often. But truce. If you can be objective about Lindsey Buckingham, at least check out this performance link. I think you can appreciate great guitar playing...

https://youtu.be/UwGQKuUeQC8

Posted by Dezmond on Tuesday, 03.17.15 @ 01:28am


Zach
Genius ..? Now you're a human IQ detector?




Posted by groundcontrol on Tuesday, 03.17.15 @ 04:38am


Relax, Dezmond. It was merely a humorous term of endearment based on our past disagreements. :)

I checked out the link you provided. I'd rate it about 3 out of 5. Someone should have told Lindsey to cut out those ridiculous-sounding "Ooh, aah" sounds and to bring someone else in to sing (The guy ain't exactly a Jackie Wilson, Jon Hendricks, or Freddie Mercury in terms of vocal phrasing, vocal range, or overall technique). He sounds a bit Django Reinhardt-esque in the beginning and generally keeps the tempo up, which are pluses. Still doesn't come close to matching the masters for sheer technique and virtuosity, but better than most of what I've heard from Buckingham. I've come to prefer instrumental music to vocal music (with some exceptions), so if this were an instrumental-only song, I'd bump the rating up to a 3.5/4. I like fast playing, but oftentimes it usually ends up getting repetitive and sounds like the same handful of notes are being repeated, only in different patterns.

My enjoyment of guitar-based music depends entirely on the given style/genre. I primarily listen to jazz (any style will do), electric blues, surf, and rockabilly stuff. I enjoy some metal, classic rock-type material, and country-western, but none would be my first choice to hear. I absolutely detest punk rock, folk, psychedelic, acoustic/Delta/Piedmont blues, and nu-metal, basically anything where sound effects (distortion and fuzz get on my nerves quickly, but if used sparingly they're OK) are overused or the same 1-3 chord progressions are rehashed. Honestly, though, I'd rank the guitar below piano/organ, saxophone and trumpet (Also a fan of harmonica, drums, bass, clarinet, and cornet) on my instruments I enjoy hearing most. These are the guitarists who I could listen to for hours on end, though:

Django Reinhardt: This man is God on the guitar. Plain and simple.
Les Paul
Bo Diddley
Charlie Christian
George Benson
T-Bone Walker
Stevie Ray Vaughan
Eddie Cochran
Hubert Sumlin
Link Wray
Elliott Easton
Mick Ronson
Jeff Beck

Beyond these names, and perhaps 5-8 others I'm leaving off at the moment due to a temporary lapse of recall, there's no one else I can get enthusiastic about to the point where I could listen to them any longer than an hour. Piano, sax, and trumpet are more my game.

In the spirit of promoting harmony, I recommend you check out my comments regarding Thelonious Monk, Bob Wills, and Scott Joplin on their respective pages. I'm not entirely sure whether you like any of those three, but they've been in frequent rotation on my iPod lately. Either way, Let's get some discussion going on them!

Posted by Zach on Thursday, 03.19.15 @ 01:52am


I don't know how long I can take such civility between us, Zach. =)

In the continued spirit of harmony, I like most of those guitarists that you listed. I am impressed that you had Jeff Beck there. I am a Beck fanatic. I own everything he's put out, even the bad stuff. And there is lots of bad stuff. I am not as huge of a SRV fan as I used to be, but I still appreciate him. I was fortunate enough to see him live about five times or so before his demise (I guess it would be more difficult to see him after).

Link Wray is outstanding. By the way, have you listened to his early 70's stuff (it is way different from his more famous instrumental material)? It is very rootsy and interesting, but sounds like a completely different artist. Hard to find, but worth the search.

As a huge Cars and Bowie fan, I also appreciate the work of Easton and Ronson, respectively. Love Sumlin's work too, of course.

As for the three artists you listed at the end, I am not very versed in Wills at all (I've heard a few things), I like Joplin, and I'd say I'm a pretty big Thelonious Monk fan. With jazz, I also love Miles Davis, Wes Montgomery (another great guitarist), Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Charles Mingus (some of his stuff, anyway), Brubeck, and some Coltrane and Ramsey Lewis Trio. I also love Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ). Have you listened to any of their stuff? Brilliant and subtle, it is jazz of the highest order.

I appreciate you checking out the Buckingham clip. The "ooh-ah" stuff at the end...that is vintage Buckingham right there. He is a very strange dude, but as a guitar player myself, I can attest to his technique on the instrument. Your rather dismissive comment on Buckingham-era Mac as "shlock" is what prompted me to share the link. I just think his playing, arranging, and production skills (he basically produced their biggest records, regardless of whoever else is listed on the jackets) is often underestimated, that's all.

Posted by Dezmond on Thursday, 03.19.15 @ 13:24pm


Induct them now!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 04.25.16 @ 22:09pm


The Kingston Trio: 1957-1967

01. Dave Guard (1957-1961; vocals, guitar, banjo) DEAD
02. Bob Shane (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo) ALIVE
03. Nick Reynolds (1957-1967; vocals, guitar, conga drum, bongos) DEAD
04. John Stewart (1961-1967; vocals, guitar, banjo) DEAD

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.29.16 @ 23:15pm


Bob Shane turns 84 in February!

Posted by Roy on Monday, 11.27.17 @ 19:32pm


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