The Carpenters

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1994 (The 1995 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? No  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Projected in 2013 (ranked #249) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Close To You (1970)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
We've Only Just Begun (1970)
(They Long To Be) Close To You (1970)
Superstar (1971)
Goodbye To Love (1972)
Top Of The World (1972)

The Carpenters @ Wikipedia

The Carpenters Videos

Will The Carpenters be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

148 comments so far (post your own)

Rolling Stone hated this Group. Rolling Stone Magazine writers are narrow minded bigots

Posted by warren bishop on Wednesday, 08.30.06 @ 01:35am


Karen Carpenter had one of the most beautiful natural singing voices ever and her brother Richard could certainly craft some beautiful songs.

Posted by Ken on Wednesday, 11.1.06 @ 10:03am


The Carpenters had a lot of hits and Karen's voice was exceptional, but I would hardly describe The Carpenters or their music as rock and roll.

Posted by richard on Thursday, 01.25.07 @ 16:29pm


The Carpenters deserve their place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for their contribution to music! They were HUGE in the 1970's and would have continued to be if Karen Carpenter had survived. Noone has matched Karen's voice or Richard's arrangements and noone ever will. So visit http://www.gocarpenters.com and sign the petition!

Posted by GoCarpenters on Wednesday, 08.29.07 @ 07:33am


The Carpenters' covers of songs like "This Masquerade" "Song for you" and "Superstar" are seminal performances. Plus, the group virtually invented the "rock ballad" with the brilliant recording "Goodbye to Love" (Sideman Tony Peluso deserves recognition in is own right for his master-stroke).
Richard Carpenter's production, arranging and composing alone merit induction; Karen Carpenter's irreplacable voice AND influence on future singers AND female drummers are the type of things the R&RHOF SHOULD be celebrating and recognizing. Failure to do so is tragic.

Posted by Dave on Sunday, 09.30.07 @ 22:27pm


What is so hilarious about this is people who sneer: "THAT'S not really rock and roll".

Rock and roll boasts of its roots in anti-establishment and here comes some elite snob telling the rest of us what does and doesn't qualify as rock and roll.

The new establishment = just as corrupt and oppressive as the old establishment.

Why - for example - is James Taylor in and the Carpenters not? Is it sales? Carpenters sold far more records in the 1970's than Taylor (including several #1 and top 10 records). Both wrote their own songs, both were known for their easy-listening sound. I just don't get it.

Posted by sd42webmaster on Monday, 10.1.07 @ 12:28pm


Well when you hook up with Carly Simon, have the Beatles steal one of you songs, and have a love affair with heroin then you've made considerable inroads with the Rolling Stone crowd......

Posted by SG on Monday, 10.1.07 @ 14:08pm


Like it or not, the songs of the Carpenters are part of our youth. You know, back in the old days when songs told stories and you could actually understand the words and listen while your parents were in the room!
Beautiful lyrics like "I Need to Be in Love" and a true Christmas original "Merry Christmas, Darling" should be recognized and honor the "easy" listening sound.

Posted by normajeane on Thursday, 12.27.07 @ 20:43pm


The Carpenters deserve more than an apology from a music "establishment" that has been slow to admit the obvious – excellence isn’t limited to any one genre or form and is, in fact, its best when it breaks new ground – as they did with sparkle, sweetness and directness. The Carpenters should have been inducted in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame years ago and it is a discredit to the integrity of the award and the spirit of rock & roll that it’s taken so long. Jann Wenner and his ilk are meglomaniacal cowards who got rich as bystanders to something they neither embodied or enabled. This is the most outrageously indefensible black-balling and disgrace

Posted by Billl Hosley on Sunday, 02.10.08 @ 20:57pm


I would put them in the Hall Of Fame on the merits of influence in the same league as Non rock acts like Miles Davis and Leonard Cohen. Different influence but very respectful in terms of depth, style, and impact on the landscape of American music.

Posted by JasonP on Monday, 02.25.08 @ 06:59am


If the greatest female voice in this century is NOT in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame....then, quite simply, there should be NO Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by Bill Carminati on Tuesday, 03.4.08 @ 08:31am


The Carpenters deserve to be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Karen had the best voice I've ever heard. Richard arrangements are beatiful. They have sold over 100 million records, their music is timeless. The Hall of Fame is very INCOMPLETE without the Carpenters.

The Carpenters --> Hall of Fame

Posted by Raoul on Tuesday, 04.1.08 @ 01:45am


The Carpenters deserve a place in the Rock & Roll hall of fame, not only because of their influence, but because they where a great band.

Can't a "softer" band be part of the Hall?

Also remember the fact that they where among the first ones to use music videos and electric guitar solos in ballads (outraging a few fans), thus pretty much inventing the "power ballad".

Posted by 8-bit on Tuesday, 05.27.08 @ 20:02pm


They deserved to be in.

Posted by Akeem on Wednesday, 06.11.08 @ 00:55am


THE CARPENTERS WERE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR IN THE 70'S AND HAD A MAJOR IMPACT ON THE MUSIC OF THEIR TIME. iT WAS THEIR MUSIC THAT REALLY BROUGHT LOVE SONG BACK, WITHOUT SCREAMING. mORE PEOPLE LOVED THEIR MUSIC THAN IT APPEARED, LOOK AT THE RECORD SALES, TV SERIES AND THEIR GREAT CHRISTMAS SPECIALS. KARENS VOICE WAS TIMELESS AND RICHARDS ARRANGEMENTS WERE PERFECT FOR THEM. THEY WERE STAPLES FOR WEDDINGS THROUGHOUT THE SEVENTIES AND EIGHTIES.

Posted by JOHN MC ALPIN on Friday, 06.13.08 @ 10:13am


THE CARPENTERS WERE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR IN THE 70'S AND HAD A MAJOR IMPACT ON THE MUSIC OF THEIR TIME. iT WAS THEIR MUSIC THAT REALLY BROUGHT LOVE SONG BACK, WITHOUT SCREAMING. mORE PEOPLE LOVED THEIR MUSIC THAN IT APPEARED, LOOK AT THE RECORD SALES, TV SERIES AND THEIR GREAT CHRISTMAS SPECIALS. KARENS VOICE WAS TIMELESS AND RICHARDS ARRANGEMENTS WERE PERFECT FOR THEM. THEY WERE STAPLES FOR WEDDINGS THROUGHOUT THE SEVENTIES AND EIGHTIES.

Posted by JOHN MC ALPIN on Friday, 06.13.08 @ 10:13am


they should be in the hall of fame, their songs are timeless

Posted by Akeem on Saturday, 06.14.08 @ 04:00am


As a rock musician who toured & recorded during
the Carpenter's era, I find it remarkable & sad, Karen, Richard et all aren't in the hall. A review of the diversity of artists already in
the hall, surely would prove broad enough to allow room for The Carpenter's fabulous music, influential sound & "unparalleled" production work. Not to mention at least to me, in Karen Carpenter.. likely the greatest female voice and singer who has "ever" lived, & a great drummer. Richard too, remains greatly under appreciated
for his incredible talents. Then, there's the most consecutive top 10 hits in history??.. more than Elvis or The Beatles.. their dominance of
a decade.. & to date 150 million units sold!! Hey, I love The Buzzcocks, but when they're in,
& The Carpenters still not.. wtf!!.. "please". The Ghost Rider isn't the only person who relaxes with & loves The Carpenters. With all the hate &
frantic noise in popular music today, it seems to me The Carpenters are sounding great as ever, and are a sane refuge, for all of us who are aging.. hopefully gracefully. When it becomes "hip" now to think The Carpenters are fabulous, then it's LONG PAST TIME, to give them their "well" deserved due. The powers that be, could show some intellectual and emotional guts for a change.. and elect The Carpenters into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. May God always bless you KC. Thanks..

Posted by A W Woodward on Wednesday, 06.18.08 @ 03:06am


When my mother heard the news about Karen Carpenter's death on Feb. 4, 1983, and started talking about her, my brother, not all that familiar with 70's music, asked "Is she the one who sang "Bette Davis Eyes?" My mom said "No, she had hits years ago." My brother had the right initials though (KC=Karen Carpenter and Kim Carnes)

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Wednesday, 07.23.08 @ 14:16pm


The Carpenters are the most successful American chart act of the 1970's. Their music was and remains influential to this day.
Karen had, as Burt Bacharach stated at the time of her death in 1983, "a heaven-sent voice, like no one before her and no one since".
Karen and Richard were top-notch jazz musicians before Karen sung a note. Karen always thought of herself as a drummer who sang. Her drum chops were exceptional, and drumming pioneers such as Buddy Rich and Keith Moon were BIG Karen fans....for her drumming abilities alone. The fact that she remains the finest ballad singer to ever live is another issue entirely!
Finally, Richard's arrangements and production was unparalleled and totally unique in the 1970's and 1980's.
That pretty much sums it up. The Carpenters were one of a kind, and they deserve a place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Posted by Bob on Saturday, 09.6.08 @ 22:26pm


the best "soft rock" group.

Posted by akeem on Tuesday, 09.23.08 @ 00:20am


They Did what they better than anyone could..Way over DO..!!!!!!!!!!!!
YES YES YES

Posted by mrxyz on Thursday, 10.2.08 @ 21:21pm


I saw the Carpenters in 1972 in vegas when I hitch hiked x-country.What impressed me a lot was Karen's ability to drum and sing at he same time,without missing a beat vocally or while drumming .Shoudnt they be in the hall of fame for Karen's breaking a glass ceiling? Remember,that back then ,girls DID NOT play instruments.If Rock n roll is about rebellion,isnt that enough? How many female muscians got instruments because they coud point at Karen Carpenter playing the drums?

Posted by paul on Wednesday, 11.12.08 @ 18:14pm


totally, i agree with you paul, it's so sad they're not recognized.

Posted by akeem on Wednesday, 11.12.08 @ 20:01pm


The Carpenters were great, but I don't see them getting into the RHOF. The argument that Karen was a rock pioneer because she played drums strikes me as frankly, ridiculous. Granted, she was a pretty good drummer, but she was more effective as a singer when out from behind the drums. Probably her drumming ability did 'inform' her singing ability, her sense of timing.

Rolling Stone does have Karen Carpenter in a new list "100 Greatest Singers of All-Time." As a singer, Karen was THAT good! The Carpenters stand on Richard's musicianship and Karen's singing. But were they rock n roll?

Posted by benny on Friday, 11.14.08 @ 08:48am


Rolling Stone does have Karen Carpenter in a new list "100 Greatest Singers of All-Time." As a singer, Karen was THAT good! The Carpenters stand on Richard's musicianship and Karen's singing. But were they rock n roll?

Posted by benny on Friday, 11.14.08 @ 08:48am


Benny
They were the best at what they did..Great Rock Ballads!
Songs of the heart...I alway use Madonna as anything better should be in lol They are/were better ..Less hype more music...


Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 11.14.08 @ 09:54am


In answer to benny's comment.Benny, I am 55 years old.I remember when the Beatles first came on the scene.I remember the music from 1960 on. Bonnie Raitt and Karen Carpenter are pioneers and for that alone deserve to be in the hall of fame.Even when the Bangles and the Go-gos came on the scene people(men)would smirk at the idea of any woman PLAYING instruments.IF ROCK AND ROLL IS ABOUT REBELLION AND BREAKING RULES THEY SHOUD BE IN,IF ROCK AND ROLL IS ABOUT FAT,AGING,POMPOUS POSUERS ,WHO FORM A GUYS CLUB THEN NO.Benny ,do me a favor ,go to you tube and watch carpenters at bukodan or live in osaka,the set starts with "Help",you will be blown away as Iwas,36 years ago. -paul

Posted by paul on Sunday, 11.16.08 @ 18:09pm


As mentioned in past post the Carpenters are great as far as Bonnie Raitt.. She is a later comer in the hit world and cant put a candle to Karen..
Karen is /was a GODDESS

Posted by mrxyz on Sunday, 11.16.08 @ 18:50pm


To all the Carpenters apologists:

Karen & Richard were not rock musicians. If you look at any one of their greatest hits compilations, none of the songs are remotely rock. Karen had an exquisite voice and Richard also was hugely gifted. They don't need you to try to remake them over into "rock" stars. Are you trying to defend the honor of the Carpenters? That's what an 'apologist' would do. For what, to try and get them into the Rock museum? Why should they even want to be in there? They don't need any such kind of validation.

And whoever is comparing Karen to Bonnie Raitt, stop it, please. You betray an ignorance about both women, and you do Karen a dis-service. Karen was one of the great pop vocalists. She sang love songs and ballads. That's what she is known for. Bonnie Raitt is a very different type of artist. And forget about the drumming. Karen was no Buddy Rich, but even if she was, Buddy is not in the Rock museum.

Don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I LIKE the Carpenters. But for me it's totally fine (and true) that they were not rock n roll. What I'm saying is stop trying to do a makeover on them. They don't need to re-imaged.

Really, I worry about some of you people who comment. Do you think getting into the Rock museum is a career maker/breaker. In the case of the Carpenters, they'll do fine without it. Stop apologizing for them.

Posted by Telarock on Sunday, 11.16.08 @ 21:56pm


Telarock

Many call it "soft rock" not to be confused with hard rock, blues rock, Latin rock, psychedelic, acid, garage rock, soul, surf, pop,folk, metal, punk,contemporary, disco.on and on... . there are many types of rock ..... "Bonnie Raitt is a very different type of artist." So true Karen could sing...

Posted by mrxyz on Sunday, 11.16.08 @ 22:49pm


i agree some points with Telarock, but can you explain why James Taylor was inducted

Posted by akatsuki on Monday, 11.17.08 @ 02:04am


Telarock, i mean your opinion why James Taylor was inducted

Posted by akatsuki on Monday, 11.17.08 @ 02:05am


mrxyz, I should rename you mr-a-b-c. After our last go-round re surf music, you still didnt seem able to discern btwn the subgenres surf pop and surf rock. That is "abc" stuff. And you still seem to think Wipe Out is the opus magnum of surf music. (lol) But, hey, yor an old fart and so am I - so you have my sympathy! (smile)

Imagine if there was a lost video that turned up of Karen Carpenter playing Wipe Out on her drums? You could then lobby to have the Carpenters nominated as a surf rock group!

Now let's get on with the discussion, and akatsuki, this is to you also. First, do away with the oxymoronic phrase "soft rock". Remove it from yor lexicon. Strike it from the glossary. You would never say a fire is cold, would you? Neither should you use "soft" as a prefix for rock music.
fire (yes) ... hot fire (yes) ... cold fire (no)
steel (yes)... hard steel (yes)... weak steel (no)
rock (yes) ... hard rock (yes) ... soft rock (no)
No matter how much yor tempted, don't use the term "soft rock" - you might as well say the music is lukewarm, which is to say, it sucks? (haha) Capenters were not "soft rock", don't insult them. They were pop.

So now akatsuki, what about James Taylor? He is not, strictly speaking, a rocker either; but he IS in the Rock Hall of Fame. His songs are variously described as:
- American folk music
- folk rock
- pop rock
But of his 10 major songs, there is maybe only one, Steam Roller Blues, that even qualifies him. And, it is a blues song technically. Now here is the reality of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. It should be called the "Rock & Blues & Soul Music, w/ a little Country" Music Hall of Fame. But alas, the Carpenters were none of that. And unlike James Taylor and Leonard Cohen, they were not favored by rock literati either. (Reality checked?) But, your point is well taken.

Just a point re Bonnie Raitt. She is best known as a blues artist. She is rightfully in the Rock museum. Despite what mrxyz says, she has a great voice and her blues guitar artistry is much respected. I bet she could even do Wipe Out if she tried (on guitar, not drums). Also, mrxyz, Ms. Raitt did have many "national" as well as worldwide hit songs. I know how you value that.

Lastly, there ARE a lot of non-rock artists in the Rock museum. And hey, maybe they should put the Carpenters in? But stop this bullsh!t about them being "soft" rock. Yor makin me sick. (now gimme a break)

Posted by Telarock on Monday, 11.17.08 @ 14:48pm


Telarock
are you feeling ok? As far as Karen doing "Wipe Out" what would you say if I saw her do it..?lol
Soft Rock is the word I got from Wikipedia..
I have a feeling the Carpenters impire is well a ware of what was written about them..
She was a good drummer So is Hal Blaine lol

Surfs Up RU?

Posted by mrxyz on Monday, 11.17.08 @ 18:38pm


mrxyz, I checked and Hal Blaine is already in the RHOF. I don't know if he ever did "Wipe Out" ... but I bet he could probably do it alright if he wanted.

Posted by benny on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 10:33am


mrxyz, I checked and Hal Blaine is already in the RHOF. I don't know if he ever did "Wipe Out" ... but I bet he could probably do it alright if he wanted.

Posted by benny on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 10:33am


I never said Hal did "Wipe Out" I am sure he is more than able to do so .Since he is the best rock drummer in history,,Yes he is in the RHOF.. He was also the drummer for the Carpenters..That is why I mentioned him..
Why we are taliking about "Wipe Out" by the Surfaris ? is strange to me.. This is the Carpenters
page..
Best go to the Surfaris page !

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 12:29pm


Telarock... you can get rid of the term "soft rock", but it'll just be replaced with something else. The station I work for calls itself "lite rock." It's got the rock beat to it, but guitars, etc. aren't jammed as hard. Feel is more laid back. Eh, what are you gonna do? The industry calls it "Adult Contemporary" which is probably the best label out there.

As for the Carpenters, yeah, they're not rock. The closest they came was "Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Craft" which has a pretty nice guitar solo in it.

But I thought I said it on this thread, and apparently I didn't. The influence that the Carpenters had was changing the face of Adult Contemporary (Or Middle Of the Road, or Lite Rock, whatever). Before, it was a format largely dominated by your pre-rock or composers/bandleaders, like Sinatra and Mancini. Even for Elvis, only his love songs (for the most part) were the ones making the AC charts. The Carpenters really changed that. Should that get them in the Hall? Maybe not. Either way, they don't need it. Their music is highly enjoyable without it.

Posted by Philip on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 16:39pm


I remember a few months ago Alice Cooper played Goodbye To Love on his syndicated radio show Nights With Alice Cooper. So Alice must think they rock.

Posted by SG on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 18:30pm


Gosh !!!!!!!
yes on the Carpenters !!!
keep soft ROCKIN!!!!

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 11.18.08 @ 23:21pm


I just came from the Philippines and they're rockin' the karaokes there.

i really don't consider them as rock material, anyway their songs are just "timeless" when I went there. not only adults but kids too know their songs and i enjoy singing their songs when i was there.

first time to give them a "yes" vote in this site.

Posted by kite on Wednesday, 11.19.08 @ 02:13am


I am a great fan of the Carpenters. Their music has been an inspiration to me and I hope it lives on forever. They deserve their spot in the Hall

Posted by don on Friday, 11.21.08 @ 05:35am


I grew up with the Carpenters & always loved their music & songs. I always loved singing along with their songs. I just loved the way Karen sang- she is missed greatly. They definately should be in the hall of fame.

Posted by norma on Sunday, 12.28.08 @ 21:11pm


@ Telarock

... Madonna.


nuff' said.

Posted by 8-bit on Saturday, 01.3.09 @ 00:13am


the Carpenters where some of the few greatest musicians. They deserve to be recognized as such.

Posted by caithlin on Wednesday, 01.14.09 @ 05:21am


101% YES

Posted by mrxyz on Tuesday, 01.27.09 @ 21:02pm


i was dreaming of them last night and thought if it's true that Rolling Stones hated this group.

miss ya karen.

Posted by akeem on Tuesday, 01.27.09 @ 22:52pm


i mean the Rolling Stones magazine

Posted by akeem on Wednesday, 01.28.09 @ 00:41am


Frankly,I DO NOT GIVE A FLYING F@##$% WHETHER OR NOT THE CARPENTERS ARE IN THE ROCK HALL OF FAME. To be perfectly honest,WHAT IS NEEDED IS THE CREATION OF A POP MUSIC HALL OF FAME.THE CARPENTERS WOULD QUALIFY IN A HEARTBEAT FOR THAT.TO TEALROCK- according to John Tobler rock historian,author of many books on pop and rock music and THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE MUSIC OF THE CARPENTERS-THEY DEFINTELY WERE ROCK MUSIC.-NOT ALL THE TIME ,THEY CROSSED OVER.TO TEALROCK, DO ME A FAVOR WATCH THE CARPENTERS AT BOUDOKAN,PART 6. ,ON YOU TUBE. You will see a great version of johnny b. goode with karen head banging on the drums.-TELL ME THATS NOT ROCK AND ROLL.-paul

Posted by paul on Sunday, 02.8.09 @ 08:22am


paul...their forte really wasn't rock. I saw Garth Brooks do about the best version of "(We're An) American Band" I'd heard outside of Grand Funk during an encore of one of his concerts, and no one calls him a "rock artist", so I'm not catching your drift here. If there were a "popular music hall of fame" (which, by the way, the one in Cleveland has pretty much turned into), they'd obviously be serious contenders for it. They were among the best at the type of music they did, and Karen Carpenter has to be mentioned among the best voices ever...

I heard "We've Only Just Begun" at so many weddings during the 70's that I thought it was THE official "wedding song"...LOL

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 02.8.09 @ 08:35am


I am, however, still waiting for someone to use "Why Don't We Do It In The Road" by the Beatles as their wedding song

"Ah-Dee-Ah-Dee-Ah-Dats all, Folks!!!!"

(I've been talking to Cheesecrop too much...he's a BAD influence...!)

Posted by Gitarzan on Sunday, 02.8.09 @ 08:44am


i agree with Gitarzan.

"They were among the best at the type of music they did, and Karen Carpenter has to be mentioned among the best voices ever..."

i just hope they will be IN in some hall of fame if not the RRHOF.

Posted by akeem on Sunday, 02.8.09 @ 21:58pm


I have one comment. The R&R Hall of fame is the biggest joke I've ever seen. To prove it just look at the groups that were inducted two year wonders. The Carpenters deserve to be in a Hall of Fame. But it would be an insult to put them in the R&R HOF.

Posted by Joe on Tuesday, 02.10.09 @ 19:55pm


The only thing I really remember about the Carpenters is Tony Peluso's solo on the way out of 'Goodbye to love'. A nice piece of playing - liked, incidentally, by the two guys left in the original Status Quo. Very seventies tone.

Posted by geof on Monday, 02.23.09 @ 06:04am


Richard really got the got when he hired Tony Peluso for this piece. I think it was fantastic. It turned the song from sad to something psychedelic (only for the guitar solo).

=================================================

The only thing I really remember about the Carpenters is Tony Peluso's solo on the way out of 'Goodbye to love'. A nice piece of playing - liked, incidentally, by the two guys left in the original Status Quo. Very seventies tone.


Posted by geof on Monday, 02.23.09 @ 06:04am

Posted by akatsuki on Tuesday, 02.24.09 @ 23:28pm


Richard really got the guts.

typo error

Posted by akatsuki on Tuesday, 02.24.09 @ 23:29pm


The only thing I really remember about the Carpenters is Tony Peluso's solo on the way out of 'Goodbye to love'. A nice piece of playing - liked, incidentally, by the two guys left in the original Status Quo. Very seventies tone.


Posted by geof on Monday, 02.23.09 @ 06:04am

I think Goodbye to Love is "more rock" than Calling Occupants. A lot of hate mails hurled after the song was released, but I think it's the best song The Carpenters have. The song was kinda innovative for the duo. Tony Peluso was really brilliant for playing the guitar solo.

Posted by akeem on Monday, 03.9.09 @ 20:24pm


Carpenters hit gold in 1970. Perhaps in 2010 The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will give credence to the fact that the Carpenters have influenced countless artists over the past four decades.

Posted by Dawn on Sunday, 04.12.09 @ 19:47pm


Carpenters hit gold in 1970. Perhaps in 2010 The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame will give credence to the fact that the Carpenters have influenced countless artists over the past four decades.

Posted by Dawn on Sunday, 04.12.09 @ 19:47pm


An artist should be innovative and influential to be in the Hall. I don't know if The Carpenters are the pioneers of Adult Contemporary category. Plus, Adult Contemporary music is not recognized as Rock. Let's just hope that the committee would recognize Adult Contemporary to be part in the RRHOF the way they recognize Rap.

Posted by akeem on Monday, 04.13.09 @ 01:34am


HANOI JANE FONDA

Posted by OKTOBERFEST on Tuesday, 06.9.09 @ 19:12pm


is it true that John Bonham went berserk when he was defeated by Karen Carpenter in a poll as the greatest drummer during 1975?

Posted by akeem on Monday, 06.15.09 @ 05:36am


akeem...From what I understand it was a Playboy poll where he finished behind her, and he got a big laugh out of it. Of course, as in most Rock stories, there's more than likely several takes on it...

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 06.15.09 @ 06:05am


I know I'd be pissed! It'd be one thing to trail Keith Moon, Bill Ward, Neil Peart, Ian Paice, Nick Mason, Roger Taylor etc. Or even someone fairly new (at the time) like a Joey Kramer or a Brian Downey. But Karen Carpenter? That'd be like losing to Mickey Dolenz.

Posted by Dean on Monday, 06.15.09 @ 10:07am


For those who compare Mickey Dolenz percussion skills to Karen Carpenter; listen to the following songs on YouTube:

Iced Tea
Caravan
Strangers in the Night

This is a 15-16 year old Karen when they were a jazz trio and won the Hollywood Bowl "Battle of the Bands"(Before they were signed to A&M). Watch the following live performances and songs on YouTube that showcase Karen's skills:

Mr. Guder-Live in Belgium
Help-Live in Australia 1972
Another Song
All I Can Do

Karen is more than capable on the skins.

Posted by Tex on Thursday, 07.16.09 @ 20:34pm


Back then, probably...but from what I've heard he's now a little bit better with 40 years of practice...funny how that works!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 07.16.09 @ 20:46pm


Yes, those two wonderful musicians are as worthy of a place as any act in the last 50 years - but if the Hall of Fame don't see fit to induct them, their legacy is in no way tarnished...admiration from the likes of Buddy Rich, Alice Cooper, Dionne Warwick, Lennon & McCartney and many other noted talents is more than enough testimony to what Karen and Richard achieved in their career.

Posted by Mark on Friday, 07.17.09 @ 15:20pm


I have a stepsister named Karen Cooper so I came up with a Rock & Roll Jeopardy question in the category "If They Married"

If this soft rock Superstar who was on the Top of the World married this No More Mr. Nice Guy who dropped out of school at Eighteen, she would become...

Who is Karen Cooper?

Also, Karen Carpenter died on Alice Cooper's 35th birthday (February 4, 1983)

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Sunday, 07.19.09 @ 11:16am


I hope the HOF has the sense to induct The Carpenters. They are so great, put out some of the best arranged and produced singles of the era, not to mention the beauty of Karen's voice.

I know a lot of people cringe at the thought of The Carpenters or others "Pop" acts being inducted, but my take on is the hall obviously has a wide definition of RnR that encompasses all Major (Both in innovation, influence, AND popularity) Pop/Rock/Blues/R&B/& now Rap acts who contributed to the development and evolution of the living creature that is Rock And Roll.
It is funny on this board, some people act like "Pop" artists like Michael Jackson, Madonna, and Prince have no relation to rock & roll. The songs themselves could be done by any other HOF, they are just wrapped in different packages. It is silly how deceived some people are by the image of the music, that they can't even think of the music objectively. One person recently posted that Earth, Wind, & Fire isn't rock, they are funk. That one really made me laugh. Instead of criticizing the HOF for their broad scope of R&R, why not just accept a HOF that includes everyone from Simon & Gafunkel to AC/DC to Billy Joel to The Coasters. That having been said, I do think the HOF has made some big errors in their omissions. But to me some of the biggest omissions are not only "rock" acts (Rush, Deep Purple), but Pop Rock acts as well (Linda Ronstadt, Neil Sedaka, Neil Diamond, Dionne Warwick, The Carpenters, The Monkees, Chicago)

Posted by Jonny on Monday, 07.20.09 @ 01:22am


Influence- Yes
Innovative- Yes
Longevity- Yes
Rock- nah

I know they don't play rock songs but hopefully they would get in soon. Hopefully, the committee would consider other subgenres of rock and roll (soft rock or adult contemporary) and I do believe they made quality music.

Posted by star on Monday, 09.7.09 @ 05:18am


Influence- Yes
Innovative- Yes
Longevity- Yes
Rock- nah

I know they don't play rock songs but hopefully they would get in soon. Hopefully, the committee would consider other subgenres of rock and roll (soft rock or adult contemporary) and I do believe they made quality music.


Posted by star on Monday, 09.7.09 @ 05:18am

Non-Performer's category coz they're not rock and roll but they contributed some for new wave of american music or music itself. they don't need to be put in this hall anyway since some of their songs are already in the grammy's hall of fame.

Posted by chubaka on Thursday, 10.22.09 @ 23:35pm


What about the HEAVY ROCK guitar by Carpenters band Guitarist Tony Peluso on "Goodbye To Love" ?

...or their Rockin' cover version of The Beach Boys "Fun Fun Fun" and Jan & Dean's "Deadman's Curve" on "Now & Then" album....?

The Carpenters also recorded Neil Young's "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"...and Leon Russell's "Superstar"...plus Klaatu's "Calling Occupants...."

...in addition to John Lennon's Beatles songs "Help !" and "Ticket To Ride"

True The Carpenters style was essentially "Easy Listening / Modern Jazz influence / Commercial Pop" - but they also championed ROCK writers as well....and COULD play in a Rockier style when they wanted....

Their Multi dubbed Vocal Harmonies can be seen as an influence on Bands such as The Bangles & The Go Gos etc....

Posted by Simon on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 09:52am


Further Carpenters cover versions of note included Tim Hardin's "Reasons to Believe", Leon Russell's "This Masquerade", a cover of Herman's hermits sixties hit "There's A Kind of Hush", and "Please Mr.Postman" (Famously also covered by The Beatles)

The Carpenters also covered The Eagles song "Desperado" and Carole King's "It's Going To Take Some Time"...plus Hank William's "Jambaya (On The Bayou)" which was earlier covered by Gerry & The Pacemakers among others...

This is in addition to all the Richard Carpenter-John Bettis original material they recorded...which veered from Rock tinged ("Goodbye To Love") to Country ("Top of The World") to pure Pop ("Only Yesterday") etc...

So they DID have a Rock aspect in their music, even if Largely their style was essentially that of Easy Listening / Pop music...

Posted by Simon on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 10:07am


Further Carpenters cover versions of note included Tim Hardin's "Reasons to Believe", Leon Russell's "This Masquerade", a cover of Herman's hermits sixties hit "There's A Kind of Hush", and "Please Mr.Postman" (Famously also covered by The Beatles)

The Carpenters also covered The Eagles song "Desperado" and Carole King's "It's Going To Take Some Time"...plus Hank William's "Jambaya (On The Bayou)" which was earlier covered by Gerry & The Pacemakers among others...

This is in addition to all the Richard Carpenter-John Bettis original material they recorded...which veered from Rock tinged ("Goodbye To Love") to Country ("Top of The World") to pure Pop ("Only Yesterday") etc...

So they DID have a Rock aspect in their music, even if Largely their style was essentially that of Easy Listening / Pop music...

Posted by Simon on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 10:07am

They are as much or more ROCK then any blues player YES

Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 16:31pm


The Carpenters were good at what they did...but I certainly wouldn't classify it as "rock"! They did cover some rock songs, but did them in a "light and airy soft pop" format. I remember when Karen was actually voted above John Bonham as a "drummer", which was good for some laughs on his part, but hardly the case.

If I listen to the Carpenters, I can actually feel my teeth start to rot...a little too much syrup for me, but they were a great talent...if you go for that sort of music...

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 16:51pm


"They are as much or more ROCK then any blues player YES"- Mr. Mxyzptlk

Sice I know that you know better than that statement, I'm gonna let it slide. But if you say anything like that again, I'm going to trick you into saying your name backwards and sending you back to the 5th Dimension...!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 16:57pm


lol. You want him to suffer some sweet blindness, or just have him sent to some stoned soul picnic? Or maybe you don't care and just want him to go up, up and away by saying his name backwards?

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:14pm


Any way you look at it, it would be "one less bell to answer"...ROFL!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:27pm


I don't know that anyone noticed, but I have "officially" passed "liam" for the number one spot...????????????

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:30pm


Several theories on that:

1. This is your projected total, not your actual total; you'll get there somewhere in May of 2010 if you keep pumping out comments

2. liam rigged the site back in the day, and the Administrator's just caught it

3. Voter registration fraud

4. You'll soon be nominated as ruler for life of this site; you are now being seen as the equivalent of a third world ruler

5. The Cult of the Milkshake has struck again

Beseech the mighty Ahura Mazda, o keeper of the faith! Zoroastrianism lives, I say!

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:40pm


"Any way you look at it, it would be "one less bell to answer""

You would go there, wouldn't you? Well, I guess you're gonna go where you want to go.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:59pm


Remember that George Harrison song "Any Road" ("if you don't know where you're goin', any road will take you there...")...that's me!!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:07pm


and congrats on being listed as top poster!

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:07pm


reminds me of another saying... not all who are wandering are lost.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:09pm


As I've often thought, you truly are the "Cheese of the crop"....

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:09pm


No, I'm just the cheesiest. Get me some macaroni, already.

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:17pm


No, you're the "Cat's pajamas"...whatever that means...

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 18:35pm


I think that should be Lax... he's the Cat Stevens' pajamas. hehehehe

Posted by Philip on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 19:01pm


They are as much or more ROCK then any blues player YES"- Mr. Mxyzptlk

Sice I know that you know better than that statement, I'm gonna let it slide. But if you say anything like that again, I'm going to trick you into saying your name backwards and sending you back to the 5th Dimension...!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 16:57pm


Hmmmm So what is rock LOL It is blues,boogie woogie ,country western,swing ,folk, jazz... All of those sounds an more are in ROCK.. Rock of Little Richard is miles from U2.....or Madonna .. I find the Carpenters easy but deep listining rock , Most if not all of it is all it very heart warming and can touch the soul....!! Some really great stuff.... Yeah it is a rock....

Posted by mrxyz on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 20:15pm


What about the HEAVY ROCK guitar by Carpenters band Guitarist Tony Peluso on "Goodbye To Love" ?

Posted by Simon on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 09:52am

IMO, Goodbye to Love has one of the best guitar riffs ever.

Posted by spanj-blob on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 07:47am


Tom Lane thinks if ABBA gets inducted this year, that could open the door to other more pop oriented artists like H&O...so will The Carpenters

Posted by spanj-blob on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 08:28am


Tom Lane thinks if ABBA gets inducted this year, that could open the door to other more pop oriented artists like H&O...so will The Carpenters

Posted by spanj-blob on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 08:28am

A good point! Makes you wonder why the Carpenters
Were not all ready in ? Seems the HALL FEELS ABBA IS ROCK BASED lol

Posted by mrxyz on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 08:36am


Several theories on that:

1. This is your projected total, not your actual total; you'll get there somewhere in May of 2010 if you keep pumping out comments

2. liam rigged the site back in the day, and the Administrator's just caught it

3. Voter registration fraud

4. You'll soon be nominated as ruler for life of this site; you are now being seen as the equivalent of a third world ruler

5. The Cult of the Milkshake has struck again

Beseech the mighty Ahura Mazda, o keeper of the faith! Zoroastrianism lives, I say!

Posted by Cheesecrop on Friday, 10.23.09 @ 17:40pm

Maybe it has something to do with Coven?

Posted by Keebord on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 09:06am


Tom Lane thinks if ABBA gets inducted this year, that could open the door to other more pop oriented artists like H&O...so will The Carpenters

Posted by spanj-blob on Saturday, 10.24.09 @ 08:28am

Read the entire post below spanj-blob

Friday, October 16, 2009
If Abba, then....
If Abba gets in the Rock Hall, will that open the door for other "Pop" oriented artists like Hall & Oates or Neil Diamond? The last may be a long shot. Listen to this WNYC - Soundcheck: Smackdown, which has a Rock Hall voter on it talking about the "elitist" Nominating Committee
keeping Diamond out. He's right, we all know that.
But if Abba can get in this year, I think other acts like them have a better chance. Now don't get me wrong, we won't see the Carpenters get nominated. It has to be an act that either critics like or have had some musical longevity that the snobs at the Hall can't avoid. That's what happened this year with Kiss (a non-Pop act, I know), but now is happening with Abba. So, let's root for them.

Posted by crapwork on Tuesday, 12.29.09 @ 03:10am


Rock & Roll Jeopardy

Category: If They Collaborated

If The Carpenters were to do a song with the Boomtown Rats, it would be called...

What is "I Don't Like Rainy Days And Mondays"

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Thursday, 02.11.10 @ 01:56am


I visited the museum in 2004 and was impressed. Could I see some of the inductees that had already been inducted as my choice...certainly not, but that is what "I" think. All of us come from different backgrounds with different stories and, according to our lives, we all have different artists that we relate closer to than others, and thank God. I appreciate everyone's comments on here about The Carpenters, either side of the coin. When all is said and done, I don't think it would be hurting any one to induct an incredible arranger and pianist along with his sister who has arguably one of the best voices ever heard and was a drummer as well. If you listen to the entire Carpenters catalog of music as a whole, you will be totally amazed at the depth and variance with which they played and sang. James Taylor is right up there on the same lines and he was inducted. I am hoping that one day The Carpenters will get their honor and grace the Hall of Fame Inductees Video Wall. Thanks for your consideration...Joey in Chicago, a Carpenters fan since 1973

Posted by Joey B on Monday, 02.15.10 @ 01:28am


Every one knows that the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame is very biased and only a moron would not have the Carpenters not included or inducted by now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It is all about the Music...

It started with Rock and Roll & Rhythm and Blues!!

Even in his own words....Elvis Presley!!!! said

“ A lot of people seem to think I started this business, but rock 'n' roll was here a long time before I came along. Nobody can sing that kind of music like colored people. Let's face it: I can't sing like Fats Domino can. I know that.

in 1916
The first use of the phrase "rocking and rolling" on record seems to have come on Little Wonder # 339, "The Camp Meeting Jubilee" by an unnamed male vocal quartet.[2][4] This includes the lyrics "We've been rockin' an' rolling in your arms / Rockin' and rolling in your arms / In the arms of Moses." Here the meaning is clearly religious rather than secular.

in 1922
"My Man Rocks Me (With One Steady Roll)" by Trixie Smith. Although it was played with a backbeat and was one of the first "around the clock" lyrics, this slow minor-key blues was by no means rock and roll. However, the title and lyrics make this the first recording offering the secular sexual meaning attached to the words rock and roll[5].

in 1927
"Kansas City Blues" by Jim Jackson (recorded on October 10, 1927). This was a best selling blues, suggested as one of the first million-seller records[6][7]. Its melody line was re-used and developed by Charlie Patton ("Going To Move To Alabama") and Hank Williams ("Move It On Over") before emerging in "Rock Around The Clock", and its lyrical content presaged Leiber and Stoller's "Kansas City". It contains the line "It takes a rocking chair to rock, a rubber ball to roll," which Bill Haley would later incorporate into his 1952 recording, "Sundown Boogie."

in 1928
"It's Tight Like That" by Tampa Red with pianist Georgia Tom (Thomas A. Dorsey) (recorded on October 24, 1928) was a highly successful early hokum record, which combined bawdy rural humour with sophisticated musical technique. With his Chicago Five, Tampa Red later went on to pioneer the Chicago small group "Bluebird" sound, while Dorsey became "the father of gospel music".
"Pine Top's Boogie Woogie" by Clarence "Pinetop" Smith (recorded on December 29, 1928) was one of the first hit "boogie woogie" recordings, and the first to include classic rock and roll references to "the girl with the red dress on" being told to "not move a peg" until she could "shake that thing" and "mess around". Smith's tune itself derives from Jimmy Blythe's 1925 recording, "Jimmy's Blues"[7].

in 1929
"Crazy About My Baby" by Blind Roosevelt Graves and brother Uaroy, a rhythmic country blues with small group accompaniment. Researcher Gayle Dean Wardlow has stated that this "could be considered the first rock 'n' roll recording". See also the Mississippi Jook Band, 1936.[8][9]

in 1932
"Tiger Rag" by The Washboard Rhythm Kings (later known as the Georgia Washboard Stompers) was a virtually out of control performance, with a rocking washboard and unusually high energy for the early Great Depression. [10]. It opens with a repeated one-note guitar lick that would transform into a chord in the hands of Robert Johnson, T-Bone Walker and others. This is just one of many recordings by spasm bands, jug bands, and skiffle groups that have the same wild, informal feel that early rock and roll had. After the original recording by the Original Dixieland Jass Band in 1917, "Tiger Rag" became not only a jazz standard, but was also widely covered in dance band and march orchestrations.

in 1934
The Boswell Sisters recorded their song "Rock and Roll", which refers to "the rolling rocking rhythm of the sea".

in 1935
Benny Goodman and his orchestra, with vocalist Helen Ward, recorded the swing tune "Get Rhythm in Your Feet and Music in Your Soul" in July 1935, with the line "... commence to rock and roll, get rhythm in your feet and music in your soul ...."

in 1936
"Oh! Red" by The Harlem Hamfats (recorded on April 18, 1936) was a hit record made by a small group of jazz and blues musicians assembled by J. Mayo Williams for the specific purpose of making commercially successful dance records. Viewed at the time (and subsequently by jazz fans) as a novelty group, the format became very influential, and the group's recordings included many with sex and drugs references[11].
"Skippy Whippy" and "Hittin' The Bottle Stomp" by The Mississippi Jook Band (recorded in July 1936), featuring Blind Roosevelt Graves (see 1929), were highly rhythmic instrumental recordings by a guitar-piano-tambourine trio, which had they been recorded two decades later with full amplification would have unquestionably been seen as rock and roll[12].
"I Believe I'll Dust My Broom" (recorded on November 23, 1936), "Crossroad Blues" (recorded on November 27, 1936), and other recordings by Robert Johnson, while not particularly successful at the time, directly influenced the development of Chicago blues and, when reissued in the 1960s, also strongly influenced later rock musicians.

in 1937
"Sing, Sing, Sing" by Benny Goodman (written by Louis Prima) featured repeated drum breaks by Gene Krupa, whose musical nature and high showmanship presaged rock and roll drumming.
"Rock It For Me" by Ella Fitzgerald, with Chick Webb and his Orchestra, was a swing number featuring the lyrics "...Won't you satisfy my soul, With the rock and roll?"

in 1938
"Rock Me" by Sister Rosetta Tharpe (recorded on October 31, 1938), a gospel song written by Thomas Dorsey as "Hide Me In Thy Bosom" which Tharpe performed in the style of a city blues, with ecstatic vocals and electric guitar.[13] She changed Dorsey's "singing" to "swinging," and the way she rolled the "R" in "rock me" led to the phrase being taken as a double entendre, interpretable as religious or sexual.[14] Many rock and roll stars, including Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Little Richard, have cited her music and energetic performance style as an influence.[15]
"Ida Red" by Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys, a Western swing band, featuring electric guitar by Eldon Shamblin. The tune was recycled again some years later by Chuck Berry in "Maybellene"[16].
"Roll 'Em Pete" by Pete Johnson and Joe Turner (recorded on December 30, 1938), an up-tempo boogie woogie with a hand-clapping back beat and a masterful collation of blues verses[17][7]

in 1939
"Rockin' Rollin' Mama" by Buddy Jones, a 12-bar blues played in Western swing style by a white country singer and his band, including Moon Mullican on piano, featuring the following lines:
Waves on the ocean, waves in the sea,
But that gal of mine rolls just right for me
Rockin' rollin' mama, I love the way you rock and roll
You ease my troubled mind and pacify my weary soul"[18

in 1940
"New Early In The Morning" and "Jivin' The Blues" (both recorded on May 17, 1940) by John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson, both examples of the very influential and popular rhythmic small group Chicago blues recordings on Lester Melrose's Bluebird label, and among the first on which drums (by Fred Williams) were prominently recorded
"Down the Road a Piece" by the Will Bradley Orchestra, a smooth rocking boogie number, was recorded in August of this year with drummer "Eight Beat Mack" Ray McKinley sharing the vocals with the song's writer, Don Raye. The song would go on to become a rock and roll standard, recorded by hundreds of rock artists, among them being Amos Milburn, Chuck Berry, The Rolling Stones, Jerry Lee Lewis, Foghat, and Bruce Springsteen. But the 1940 original by Will Bradley holds up as the first truly rocking version of the song.
The "eight beats" in McKinley's nickname and the popular phrase "eight to the bar" in many songs indicate the newness of the shift from the four beats per bar of jazz to boogie woogie's eight beats per bar that is characteristic of rock and roll to this day.
"Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" by The Andrews Sisters contains numerous proto-rock and roll elements. This is the group's best-known example, though they also recorded other proto-rock recordings such as "Beat Me Daddy Eight to the Bar." It is notable is that both of these songs were written by the same man, namely, Don Raye.

in 1942
"Flying Home" by Lionel Hampton and his Orchestra, tenor sax solo by Illinois Jacquet, recreated and refined live by Arnett Cobb, a model for rock and roll solos ever since: emotional, honking, long, not just an instrumental break but the keystone of the song. The Benny Goodman Sextet had a popular hit in 1939 with a subdued "jazz chamber music" version of the same song featuring guitarist Charlie Christian. In 1944, Jacquet recorded an even more "honking" solo on "Blues, Part 2", billed as by "Jazz at the Philharmonic".
"Mean Old World" by T-Bone Walker is an early classic by this hugely influential guitarist, often cited as the first song in which he fully found his sound. B. B. King credits Walker as inspiring him to take up the electric guitar, but his influence extends far beyond the blues to jazz and of course rock and roll. "Mean Old World" has a one-chord guitar lick in it which would be further developed by fellow Texas bluesman Goree Carter, Elmore James and most famously, Chuck Berry. Walker's 1947 "T-Bone Jumps Again" and "T-Bone Shuffle" also show off his picking prowess.

in 1943
"The Joint is Really Jumpin' at Carnegie Hall" performed by Judy Garland and Jose Iturbi in the film Thousands Cheer is notable not only for its boogie-woogie arrangement but for the lyric "when they start to rock" which uses the word "rock" in a purely musical sense (as opposed to its more common use at this time as a double entendre for sex). But Garland was far from being the first to use the term "rocking" in a musical sense in a movie. She was beaten to it by 5 years, because in 1938, Gertrude Niesen sang the song "Rockin' The Town" in the movie, Start Cheering, and The Boswell Sisters five years before in Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round with "Rock and Roll" (although it should be noted the Boswell song is strictly about the rocking and rolling of ocean waves and has no musical or sexual reference).

in 1944
"Straighten Up and Fly Right" by the Nat King Cole Trio, very light on the rocking, but a popular hit with lyrics from an African American folk tale, sounding similar to Bo Diddley but without the big beat.
"I Wonder" and "Cecil's Boogie" by Cecil Gant, early black ballad performances that became widely popular, the first of the black tenors[17]. Cecil's Boogie had many rock n roll undertones.
[edit] 1945
"The Honeydripper" by Joe Liggins (recorded on April 20, 1945), synthesized boogie-woogie piano, jazz, and even the riff from the folk chestnut "Shortnin' Bread" into an exciting dance performance that topped the R&B "race" charts for 18 weeks[3].
"Guitar Boogie" by Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith, the first boogie woogie played on the electric guitar, and much imitated by later country boogie guitarists[3][17].
[edit] 1946
Louis Jordan's "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie" (recorded in January 1946) and "Let the Good Times Roll" (as well as 1945's "Caldonia") were hugely influential in style and content, and popular across both black and white audiences. Their producer Milt Gabler went on to produce Bill Haley's hits, and Jordan's guitarist Carl Hogan, on such songs as "Ain't That Just Like A Woman" (also 1946), was a direct influence on Chuck Berry's guitar style[17].
"House of Blue Lights" by Freddie Slack and Ella Mae Morse (recorded on February 12, 1946), the first white artists to perform what is now seen as R&B[17][3].
"Boogie Woogie Baby," "Freight Train Boogie" and "Hillbilly Boogie" by The Delmore Brothers, featuring harmonica player Wayne Raney, were typical up-tempo recordings, heavily influenced by the blues, by this highly influential country music duo, who had first recorded in 1931. One of their most influential records, "Blues Stay Away From Me", was recorded in 1949.[24][25]
[edit] 1947
"Move It On Over" by Hank Williams, which used a similar melody to Jim Jackson's 1927 "Kansas City Blues" and which was itself used in "Rock Around The Clock".
"Ten Gallon Boogie" and other tracks by Pee Wee King and his Golden West Cowboys presage "Rock Around the Clock." Their vocals were standard pop/western, but their arrangements and melodies, opening with aggressive accordion chords linked it to Bill Haley and the Comets' Johnny Grande who played that instrument in the Comets' early work as a Western Swing band and later playing rock on some films and touring.
"Oakie Boogie" by Jack Guthrie, a Western swing country boogie.
"Good Rocking Tonight", in separate versions by Roy Brown and Wynonie Harris (recorded on December 28, 1947), both black artists. Brown's original version is a jump blues that parodies gospel music, and for the first time fuses the spiritual sense of "rocking" with the secular meanings of dancing and sex. Harris' version is much more up-beat and rhythmic, closer to rock and roll, and led to a craze for blues with "rocking" in the title[17][3]. Later spiritedly covered by Elvis Presley and less spiritedly by Pat Boone.
"We're Gonna Rock, We're Gonna Roll" by Wild Bill Moore (recorded on December 18, 1947), the first commercially successful "honking" sax record, with the title as a background chant[3].
"I Can't Be Satisfied" by Muddy Waters, recorded in 1947 and first released in 1948, which contains all the elements of what would soon become rock n' roll: a bass/snare/electric guitar combo playing blues with a heavy backbeat. The single was a big hit in the Chicago area. Recorded by local record company Aristocrat, it was one of the last singles on the label before it changed its name to Chess Records, which became one of the most important players in the early development of rock n' roll and electric blues music.
[edit] 1948
"Chicken Shack Boogie" by Amos Milburn, a piano-led boogie with references to out-of-hours drinking and cavorting, which became a huge hit[17].
"Rovin' Eyes" by Bill Haley and the Four Aces of Western Swing. It is a highly overlooked song that is backed with a standard Western Swing tune called Candy and Women. This song sounds like the later Bill Haley. It has all the elements of 50's Rock 'n' Roll. The song was pretty fast for its time and almost broke the boundaries of Western Swing.[1]
[edit] 1949
"Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee" by Stick McGhee and his Buddies (recorded on February 14, 1949), an early "party" song later recorded by Jerry Lee Lewis[3].
"Rock And Roll" by Wild Bill Moore, actually recorded the previous year. A rocking boogie where Moore repeats throughout the song "Were going to rock and roll, we're going to roll and rock" and ends the song with the line, "Look out mamma going to do the rock and roll."[26]
Another song was "Rock and Roll Blues" by Erline 'Rock and Roll' Harris, a female singer, with the lyrics "I'll turn out the lights, we'll rock and roll all night"[27]
"We're Gonna Rock this Joint Tonight", also known as "Rock the Joint", first recorded by Jimmy Preston in May 1949, is often considered a prototype rock and roll song[3]. It was covered in 1951 by Jimmy Cavallo and in 1952 by Bill Haley and the Saddlemen; Marshall Lytle, bass player for the Comets, claims this was one of the songs that inspired Alan Freed to coin the phrase "rock and roll" to refer to the music he played.
"Saturday Night Fish Fry" by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five (recorded on August 9, 1949) was a large and influential hit. The song tells of a New Orleans fish fry that ends with a police raid and has the repeated refrain "It was rocking"[3].
"The Fat Man" by Fats Domino (recorded on December 10, 1949), featuring Fats on wah-wah mouth trumpet, the first of his 35 Top 40 hits. The insistent back beat of the rhythm section dominates. The song is based on "Junker's Blues", by Willie "Drive'em Down" Hall[3].
"Rock Awhile" by Goree Carter, recorded on the Freedom label in Houston, Texas.[28] It opens with an insistent version of T-Bone Walker's one-chord electric guitar lick, which would be made famous later by Chuck Berry on "Maybelline."
"Rag Mop" by Johnnie Lee Wills and Deacon Anderson is a novelty tune; the lyrics are simply the title spelled out. The song is best known from its 1950 hit recording by the Ames Brothers.
[edit] 1950s
[edit] 1950
"Rock Me to Sleep," written by Benny Carter and Paul Vandervoort II and recorded by Helen Humes backed by the Marshall Royal Orchestra.
"Birmingham Bounce" by Hardrock Gunter, one of the first references to "rockin'" on the dance floor[3][17].
"(Gonna Rock and Roll) Gonna Dance All Night" by Hardrock Gunter, released after Birmingham Bounce, the main lyric stating "Gonna Rock and Roll, Gonna Dance All Night" may be the first use of the phrase "Rock and Roll" in a purely musical context.
"Hot Rod Race" performed by Arkie Shibley and His Mountain Dew Boys, highlighting the role of fast cars in teen culture[3].
"Sixty Minute Man" by the Dominoes (recorded on December 30, 1950). This was the first (and most explicit) big R&B hit to cross over to the pop charts, and the group itself (featuring Clyde McPhatter) appeared at many of Alan Freed's early shows[3][17].
[edit] 1951
"How High The Moon" by Les Paul and Mary Ford (recorded on January 4, 1951), the first big hit record to use electronic "gimmicks" like overdubbing, and one of the first with an electric guitar solo[3].
"Rocket 88" (recorded on March 5, 1951) by Jackie Brenston and his Delta Cats (actually Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm), and covered later in the year by Bill Haley and the Saddlemen. Both versions of this song have been declared the definitive first rock and roll record by differing authorities. Brenston's was highly influential for its sound and lyrical content, and was a big hit. It reached #1 on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues chart on 9 June 1951 and set Sun Records on the road to success. Haley's version was one of the first white covers of an R&B hit, and set the course of his future career. Haley 's version had more drive to it, and the vocals were improved.[3][17].
"Boogie Woogie Blues", recorded in New York in mid-May 1951 by Charlie Graci. Later he would add an "e" to his name and, in 1957, his original version of "Butterfly" would sell more than two million copies.
[edit] 1952
"Hound Dog" by Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton (recorded on August 13, 1952), a raucous R&B song recorded with Johnny Otis' band (uncredited for contractual reasons), written by white teenagers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller.[3].
"Rockin' An' Rollin'". Recorded by Charlie Gracie in New York in 1952.
[edit] 1953
"Gee" by The Crows (recorded on February 10, 1953). This was a big hit in 1954, and is credited by rock n’ roll authority, Jay Warner, as being "the first Rock n’ Roll hit by a rock and roll group".[29]
"Crazy Man, Crazy" by Bill Haley and his Comets (recorded in April 1953) was the first of his recordings to make the Billboard pop chart. This was not a cover, but an original composition. Haley said he heard the phrase at high-school dances his band was playing[17].
"Mess Around" by Ray Charles (recorded in May 1953), one of his first hits. It was written by Ahmet Ertegün, with some lyrics riffing off of the 1929 boogie woogie classic, "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie".[30]
[edit] 1954
"Shake, Rattle and Roll" by Big Joe Turner (recorded on February 15, 1954), covered later by Bill Haley and his Comets. Turner's version topped the Billboard R&B chart in June 1954. Haley's version, which was substantially different in lyric and arrangement, actually predating the success of "Rock Around the Clock" by several months though it was recorded later. Elvis Presley's later 1956 version combined Haley's arrangement with Turner's lyrics, but was not a substantial hit.[3].
"Sh-Boom" by the Chords (recorded on March 15, 1954), and The Crew-cuts. In this case, the latter was a pale imitation. The song is considered a pioneer of the doo-wop variant.[3]
"Rock Around the Clock" by Bill Haley and his Comets (recorded on April 12, 1954) was the first number one rock and roll record. This song is often credited with propelling rock into the mainstream, at least the teen mainstream. At first it had lack-luster sales but, following the success of two other Haley recordings, the aforementioned "Shake Rattle and Roll" and "Dim, Dim The Lights", was later included in the movie Blackboard Jungle about a raucous high-school, which exposed it to a wider audience.[3]. The song had first been recorded in late 1953 by Sonny Dae & His Knights, a novelty group led by Paschal Vennitti, whose recording had become a modest local hit at the time Haley recorded his version.
"That's All Right (Mama)" by Elvis Presley (recorded in July 1954); this cover of Arthur Crudup's tune was Elvis' first single. Its b-side was a rocking version of Bill Monroe's bluegrass song "Blue Moon Of Kentucky", itself recognized by various rock singers as an influence on the music.[3].
"I Got a Woman" by Ray Charles (recorded in November 1954); composed with band mate Renald Richard, and first performed while on tour with T-Bone Walker, this was not only Charles' first really big hit, but is also widely considered to be the first soul song, combining gospel and R&B.[31][32]
[edit] 1955
"Bo Diddley" by Bo Diddley (recorded on March 2, 1955).[3].
"Maybellene" by Chuck Berry (recorded on May 21, 1955).[3].
"Tutti Frutti" by Little Richard (recorded on September 14, 1955).[3].
"Blue Suede Shoes" by Carl Perkins (recorded 19 December 1955), including elements of rockabilly and country music. Later made more famous by Elvis Presley, Perkins' original version was an early rock 'n' roll standard.[3].

I Hope you all know that the people that started this Hall Of Fame don't even know where Rock and Roll Music Originated.

Ask Fats Domino, Chuck Berry and Little Richard!!!!

But don't wait too long Fats Domino is 82!!!!!

Fats Domino first attracted national attention with "The Fat Man" in 1949 on Imperial Records. This song is an early rock and roll record, featuring a rolling piano and Domino doing "wah-wah" vocalizing over a fat back beat. It sold over a million copies and is widely regarded as the first rock and roll record to do so.

Chuck Berry is 83!!!!!!

At the end of June 1956, his song "Roll Over Beethoven" reached #29 on the Billboard Top 100 chart, and Berry toured as one of the "Top Acts of '56". He and Carl Perkins became friends. Perkins said that "I knew when I first heard Chuck that he'd been affected by country music. I respected his writing; his records were very, very great." As they toured, Perkins discovered that Berry not only liked country music, but knew about as many songs as he did. Jimmie Rodgers was one of his favorites. "Chuck knew every Blue Yodel and most of Bill Monroe's songs as well," Perkins remembered. "He told me about how he was raised very poor, very tough. He had a hard life. He was a good guy. I really liked him.

Little Richard is 77!!!!!!

"More than any other performer - save, perhaps, Elvis Presley, Little Richard blew the lid off the Fifties, laying the foundation for rock and roll with his explosive music and charismatic persona. On record, he made spine-tingling rock and roll. His frantically charged piano playing and raspy, shouted vocals on such classics as "Tutti Frutti", "Long Tall Sally" and "Good Golly, Miss Molly" defined the dynamic sound of rock and roll."[1]

Richard began his recording career in 1951 by imitating the gospel-influenced style of late-1940s jump blues artist Billy Wright,[2] but did not achieve commercial success until 1955, when, under the guidance of Robert "Bumps" Blackwell, he began recording in a style he had been performing onstage for years,[3] featuring varied rhythm, a heavy backbeat, funky saxophone grooves, over-the-top Gospel-style singing, moans, screams, and other emotive inflections, accompanied by a combination of boogie-woogie and rhythm and blues music. This new music,[4] which included an original injection of funk into the rock and roll beat,[1] inspired James Brown,[5] Elvis Presley,[6] and generations of other rhythm & blues, rock and soul music artists.[7] He was subsequently among the seven initial inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986 and was one of only four of these honorees (along with Ray Charles, James Brown, and Fats Domino) to also receive the Rhythm and Blues Foundation's Pioneer Lifetime Achievement Award.

Jann Wenner and her friends need to go to School and learn about the History of Rock and Roll!!!!

Jann, Myself as a fan of all Music please as Cher would say "WAKE UP" and "SNAP OUT OF IT" and remember that it is about all of the Music!!!!

Rock and Roll & Rhythm and Blues....




Posted by R J ROGGERO on Thursday, 03.4.10 @ 23:50pm


Don't forget

B B King!!!!! Mr. King is 84!!!!!!!!

Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925), known by the stage name B.B. King, is an American blues guitarist and singer-songwriter acclaimed for his expressive singing and guitar playing.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked him at #3 on its list of the "100 greatest guitarists of all time."[1] According to Edward M. Komara, King "introduced a sophisticated style of soloing based on fluid string bending and shimmering vibrato that would influence virtually every electric blues guitarist that followed."[2]

In 1949, King began recording songs under contract with Los Angeles-based RPM Records. Many of King's early recordings were produced by Sam Phillips, who later founded Sun Records. Before his RPM contract, King had debuted on Bullet Records by issuing the single "Miss Martha King" (1949),

B B King says "no Carpenters no Hall OF Fame".

Karen and Richard Carpenter Rocked.

Posted by R J ROGGERO on Friday, 03.5.10 @ 00:15am


Very nicely said RJ

Posted by L-7 on Friday, 03.5.10 @ 03:32am


well said R J ROGGERO, by the way when did BB King say "no Carpenters no Hall OF Fame"?

Posted by bourgeoise on Tuesday, 03.9.10 @ 05:32am


Well they let ABBA in.

Posted by Scott on Tuesday, 03.23.10 @ 15:17pm


The Carpenters owned the pop singles chart between 1970-1975, with their hybrid mix of pop, jazz, chorale, and rock influences and whose voice is most recognizable during this period? Karen Carpenter with her pitch perfect, meloncholy, subdued vocals. I am disappointed but hope ful that they will be considered and inducted in the future.

Posted by Sam Tabo on Wednesday, 03.24.10 @ 15:03pm


1. Help!
2. Another Song
3. Goodbye to Love
4. All I Can Do
5. Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing

Posted by Diane Sampson on Tuesday, 04.6.10 @ 13:14pm


now that Pop (Madonna, Abba, etc.) is already recognized in this hall of fame, it's time to induct this great pop band.

Posted by ruth on Monday, 04.26.10 @ 20:49pm


Goober Stew

Posted by Pissi on Friday, 05.14.10 @ 11:45am


One of the best Why they are not in is a SIN

Posted by hounddog on Monday, 05.17.10 @ 09:04am


Now hear is a funny vote.. They have only 875 votes with a 75% chance. Where as Coven with 5576 votes has a 76% chance... It is hard to have a serious conversation with folks, When you see votes like this .. Yes Coven is up on the top 10.. They really did change the world with "1 tin what ever it was"... .Let the games continue..? LOL
Z

Posted by mrxyz on Wednesday, 05.19.10 @ 22:21pm


it's time to give to them what is due, Pop is slowly making it in the hall (Madonna, Michael Jackson and Abba) and I think this guys really deserve it with Frank Sinatra as early influence for this genre.

Posted by akeem on Sunday, 05.23.10 @ 22:47pm


One of the most influential and important adult contemporary acts of all times, The Carpenters produced a record fifteen number one songs and remain one of the best selling musical artists of all time.


Posted by ruth on Sunday, 06.6.10 @ 11:20am


I can't endorse their election. They were the complete antithesis of anything related to Rock, Soul or what have you. They were establishment, they played for Nixon at the White House, they're music was empty and completely devoid of any meaning (although I respect that they didn't pretend otherwise), and they lacked any soul. They would probably be the most vanilla group in the Hall if inducted, even more-so than ABBA.

Posted by Chalkie on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 11:19am


I enjoy The Carpenter's material- Karen's voice was very soothing, and some of the songs are quite good. But, I can see why the HOF has ignored the act (much like Barbra Streisand).

Posted by JBR on Sunday, 06.13.10 @ 15:03pm


Congratulations for making it in the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame.

Posted by akeem on Tuesday, 06.22.10 @ 05:58am


I wasn't sure if artists like The Carpenters or even Frank Sinatra belonged in a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But now that ABBA has been inducted, I don't see how a great number of "pop" acts can be excluded. I now have to say yes to The Carpenters even to Frank Sinatra, who really was one of the first "popular" singers. And considering all the true rock artists who have been overlooked by the nominating comittee: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Deep Purple, Yes, Jethro Tull, Alice Cooper, Rush, Joan Jett, Dire Straits....this list can go on and on, it's time to see the Hall for what it really is. The Poular Music Hall of Fame. Time to induct Carpenters, Chicago, Foreigner, etc.

Posted by Mosey A. Long on Wednesday, 06.23.10 @ 02:12am


"I wasn't sure if artists like The Carpenters or even Frank Sinatra belonged in a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. But now that ABBA has been inducted, I don't see how a great number of "pop" acts can be excluded. I now have to say yes to The Carpenters even to Frank Sinatra" - Mosey A. Long

Mosey, Frank Sinatra's first recording came out in 1939, that means he predated Rock & Roll by a long shot, if he should get in it's as an Early Influence, not as a Performer, that doesn't mean he won't (Miles Davis went in as a Performer but logically it should have been Early Influence) but he shouldn't

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 06.23.10 @ 02:15am


if "soft-rock" will be recognized, IMO The Carpenters alone should be inducted nothing else to follow.

Posted by rhymes on Tuesday, 07.13.10 @ 05:14am


NO CARPENTERS NO ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME THEIR THE GREATEST BAND AFTER THE BEATLES THE GREAT CARPENTERS KAREN AND RICHARD.

Posted by joel phil. on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 04:58am


THE CARPENTERS ARE PART OF MY LIFE. I LOVE KAREN AND RICHARD SO MUCH. GO CARPENTERS FANS!HALL WAKE UP!

Posted by joel phil. on Thursday, 07.22.10 @ 05:03am


ABBA ARE GREAT BAND TOO BUT IS ABBA A ROCK BAND THE CARPENTERS ARE MORE ROCKIN THAN ABBA LISTEN TO THEIR FIRST, SECOND,FIFTH ALBUMS ITS MORE ON ROCK ABBA IS A PO DISCO BAND.

Posted by joel phil. on Wednesday, 07.28.10 @ 02:50am


ABBA ARE GREAT BAND TOO BUT IS ABBA A ROCK BAND THE CARPENTERS ARE MORE ROCKIN THAN ABBA LISTEN TO THEIR FIRST, SECOND,FIFTH ALBUMS ITS MORE ON ROCK ABBA IS A POP DISCO BAND.

Posted by joel phil. on Wednesday, 07.28.10 @ 02:54am


When are people going to learn that rock & roll is an umbrella term. There's no criteria that says an artist "most be rock" to be inducted. If ABBA is "less rock" than the Carpenters as joel phil claims, it has nothing to do with the Carpenters being more deserving than ABBA.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 07.28.10 @ 05:01am


ABBA ARE GREAT BUTTT THE CARPENTERS ARE MOREEE GREATERRR THAN THEM.LISTEN TO THE VOICE OF THE LATE GREAT KAREN CARPENTER AND NOT TO MENTION THE FIRST FEMALE GREAT DRUMMER AND THE PURE AND PERFECT ARRANGEMENT OF THE GREAT RICHARD CARPENTER. AND NOW THATS REALLY MUSIC!NO NEED TO ARGUE THE CARPENTERS ARE GREAT.I LOVE YOU KAREN AND RICHARD

Posted by joel phil. on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 01:48am


T H E C A R P E N T E R S 2011 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAMER INDUCTEE

Posted by joel from the philippines on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 01:58am


ABBA ARE GREAT BUTTT THE CARPENTERS ARE MOREEE GREATERRR THAN THEM.LISTEN TO THE VOICE OF THE LATE GREAT KAREN CARPENTER AND NOT TO MENTION THE FIRST FEMALE GREAT DRUMMER AND THE PURE AND PERFECT ARRANGEMENT OF THE GREAT RICHARD CARPENTER. AND NOW THATS REALLY MUSIC!NO NEED TO ARGUE THE CARPENTERS ARE GREAT.I LOVE YOU KAREN AND RICHARD

Posted by joel phil. on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 01:48am

Kumusta kababayan! Better work on your grammar and spelling, nakakahiya kasi, hehehe

Posted by akeem on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 02:19am


T H E C A R P E N T E R S 2011 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAMER INDUCTEE

Posted by joel from the philippines on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 01:58am

You can sign a petition at this site- gocarpenters.com

Posted by akeem on Wednesday, 08.4.10 @ 02:50am


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is more than just rock, it is a music hall of fame. The Carpenters were a fantastic group with a voice of an angel. The number one selling group in America during the 70's deserves the right to be honored. Karen is no longer with us and it would be a fitting tribute to Karen's legacy if they were inducted in the hall of fame. Richard continues the Carpenters legacy by remastering the songs that the Carpenters made classics. With those remastered classics you can hear the breaths that Karen would take during the recording sessions. Karen's emotions were biographical and she sang what she felt. Richard's arrangements are studied in music classes across the country. Bottom line these two people were one of a kind and there never will be another Karen and Richard Carpenter. Induct these two into the hall of fame!

Posted by Scott on Monday, 11.29.10 @ 21:13pm


Rock & Roll, Soul, R&B, Blues, Folk, Punk, Post-Punk, Hip Hop, even disco, basically exist as a reaction against music such as the Carpenters'.

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 11.29.10 @ 21:43pm


Rock & Roll, Soul, R&B, Blues, Folk, Punk, Post-Punk, Hip Hop, even disco, basically exist as a reaction against music such as the Carpenters'.

Posted by Chalkie on Monday, 11.29.10 @ 21:43pm

you forgot Pop.

Posted by akeem on Tuesday, 11.30.10 @ 04:51am


the 50's and the 60's were dominated by rock and soul, the 70's has a diverse taste of music: rock, soul, disco, pop, etc. the carpenters made a mark in the 70's for adult contemporary/soft rock, people accepted their music and influential for other adult contemporary artists.

Posted by nora on Thursday, 12.23.10 @ 10:35am


it's too late for me to give my condolences to the family of Tony Peluso, just found out that he died last year. RIP Tony, your "Goodbye to Love" guitar rift was really one of the bests.

Posted by akeem on Sunday, 01.9.11 @ 13:53pm


I just wrote a fairly long-winded but articulate review of why I think The Carpenters are a 'why not' for the Hall, but was just told it "looked too much like spam!"

So I'm denied the priveledge of commenting here because I actually know how to write?

Fine! With this, I am done!

Posted by Sounder on Monday, 01.31.11 @ 23:23pm


"CHALKIE" HAS WRITTEN THE FOLLOWING:

I can't endorse their election. They were the complete antithesis of anything related to Rock, Soul or what have you. They were establishment, they played for Nixon at the White House, they're music was empty and completely devoid of any meaning (although I respect that they didn't pretend otherwise), and they lacked any soul. They would probably be the most vanilla group in the Hall if inducted, even more-so than ABBA.
Rock & Roll, Soul, R&B, Blues, Folk, Punk, Post-Punk, Hip Hop, even disco, basically exist as a reaction against music such as the Carpenters'.

ALLOW ME TO RETORT, ONE POINT AT A TIME, TO THIS NONSENSE.....

They were the complete antithesis of anything related to Rock, Soul or what have you.

ONE COULD SAY THAT ABOUT NEIL DIAMOND, ABBA, THE MAMMAS & THE PAPAS, JAMES TAYLOR, CROSBY STILLS AND NASH, AND PROBABLY SEVERAL OTHERS. "POP" IN AND OF ITSELF IS NOT A NEGATING FACTOR IN TERMS OF INDUCTION.

They were establishment, they played for Nixon at the White House

"ESTABLISHMENT" SURE SOUNDS LIKE A HIPPIE PERJORATIVE TO ME. REGARDLESS, FOR THE RECORD, HERE ARE SOME OTHER ARTISTS WHO EITHER PLAYED FOR AND/OR MADE APPEARANCES AT THE NIXON WHITE HOUSE, (JUST OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD): THE TEMPTATIONS, THE TURTLES, AND SOME GUY NAMED ELVIS PRESLEY.....

they're music was empty and completely devoid of any meaning (although I respect that they didn't pretend otherwise), and they lacked any soul

THIS IS A TYPICAL (BUT MEANINGLESS) CRITICISM OF ANY POP GROUP THAT DOESN'T INCLUDE BOLD SOCIAL COMMENTARY IN THEIR LYRICS OR PRACTICE ANY KIND OF MUSICIAL "EXPERMENTATION". AS FAR AS "SOUL", WHAT DOES THAT TERM EVEN MEAN???---DO ARETHA & JANIS HAVE THE MONOPOLY ON SOUL SIMPLY BECAUSE THEY'RE LOUD SINGERS? KAREN CARPENTER WAS VERY SOULFUL, JUST IN HER OWN QUIET WAY. HER VOICE EXPRESSES SINCERITY, MELANCHOLY AND LONGING WITH INCREDIBLE CLARITY.

They would probably be the most vanilla group in the Hall if inducted, even more-so than ABBA.

BY DEFINITION, SOMEBODY HAS TO BE THE MOST VANILLA GROUP IN THE HALL, REGARDLESS OF WHO IT IS.

Rock & Roll, Soul, R&B, Blues, Folk, Punk, Post-Punk, Hip Hop, even disco, basically exist as a reaction against music such as the Carpenters'

WHEW!.....YOU FORGOT GRUNGE, RAP-METAL, THRASH, AFRICAN MUSIC, SKIFFLE, CELTIC MUSIC, AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT EVER EXISTED ON PLANET EARTH......SERIOUSLY, ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!?!?! ROCK & ROLL, SOUL, R&B, BLUES, AND FOLK ALL PRE-DATE THE CARPENTERS BY DECADES AND ARE NOT A REACTION TO ANYTHING BUT SIMPLY MUSIC GROWN OUT OF THOSE OWN PEOPLES' EXPERIENCES. FOLK IS A MUSIC BORN OUT OF PROTEST AGAINST SOCIAL & ECONOMIC INJUSTICE. PUNK AND POST-PUNK ARE JUST AS MUCH A "REACTION" TO MID-70'S AOR ROCK BLOAT/EXCESS LIKE GLAM ROCK AND PROGRESSIVE ROCK AS MUCH AS MOR MUSIC. DISCO AND HIP-HOP CAME FROM THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN UNDERGROUND-----DISCO IS JUST ANOTHER NAME FOR DANCE MUSIC, WHICH HAS BEEN AROUND FOREVER (AGAIN, NOT A "REACTION" TO ANYTHING) AND HIP-HOP BASICALLY PICKED UP WHERE DISCO LEFT OFF AND EVENTUALLY ADDED SOCIAL COMMENTARY TO THE MIX.

ENOUGH FOR TODAY. I'M OUT.......

Posted by meowski on Friday, 06.3.11 @ 12:53pm


you don't need to shout to be soulful.

Posted by leona on Sunday, 06.19.11 @ 11:51am


Elton John, Melba Moore, Anne Murray, and The Partridge Family lost the Grammy for Best New Artist to The Carpenters in 1971.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 09.18.11 @ 06:54am


IMO, The Carpenters should be part of The Immortals. They made a mark in the music history (easy listening) that only they should perform. E.g., The Beatles songs are really hard to revive by other artists because only The Beatles can really express their songs. Same goes for Led Zeppelin, Simon and Garfunkel, Queen, etc. Even though The Carpenters signature songs are not originally theirs, they made it their own. They owned those songs e.g. Superstar, We've Only Just Begun and Close To You and they're really timeless. My point is, hopefully those music critics would also recognize those artists who made big in the adult contemporary music as such genre was accepted and embraced by the people.

Posted by onehill on Friday, 11.18.11 @ 06:52am


Am saying Yes, possibly w/ some mixed feelings. Karen had a voice and ability in phrasing a song probbly as inspired as anybody bar none. And her life story, sad as it may be, is compelling. The Carpenters songs are wove into the fabric of the boomer generation - those songs were popular and had legs (to keep going). Not too rockish really (forget "soft" rock) but still I put them in the museum. They left a big mark.

Posted by Cokey on Thursday, 11.24.11 @ 10:19am


In regard to the Carpenters not being subversive enough to be in the Hall of Rock and Roll. One only has to listen to "YOUR WONDERFUL PARADE AND MR. GUDER to know your listening to some biting social commentary. The difference is that it is delivered softly. Imagine Steven Tyler those singing those songs. Frankly I do not give a damn about who gets in the RRHOF . In the future your going to see it dominated by Rap music. The RRHOF stopped being relevant long ago. It caters to prejudice-why argue about it?It is the personal feifdom of Jann Werner. Maybe Karen Carpenter wouldnt go to bed with him

Posted by paul on Wednesday, 01.4.12 @ 17:50pm


I like the Carpenters. Karen Carpenter had one of the saddest voices imaginable. But there are some legitimate issues. They were not exactly an innovative band, occupying the same artistic space as early 70s acts like the Partridge Family. Moreover, with the exception of Top of The World, which was co-written by Richard Carpenter, their main hits were all written for them by other songwriters, which to me at least is a legitimate factor. On the other hand they were popular and sold a lot of records, and some of the songs they covered are still well-known based on the quality of Karen's voice. Personally I would not vote to include them, but I see the other side of the coin too.

Posted by astrodog on Wednesday, 01.4.12 @ 19:02pm


with arrangements and Tony Peluso on guitar in "goodbye to love" adding Karens voice Carpenters definitely belong there...first power ballad
love them
Karen, Tony, RIP
will never forget you

Posted by tom on Friday, 02.3.12 @ 00:41am


now i realise that Carpenters don´t belong in RHOF...they belong in Hall Of Music, and so many of rhof don´t have a snowballs chance in hell to do it

Posted by tom on Friday, 02.3.12 @ 01:03am


I just can't understand why they are not in?
Such wonderful sounds they made!

Posted by Happy on Friday, 03.23.12 @ 23:40pm


KAREN CARPENTER OLIVIA NEWTON - JOHN AND CONNIE FRANCIS 3 OF THE GREATEST FEMALE VOICES OF ALL TIME!

Posted by JOEL C. LEOPANDO on Saturday, 05.12.12 @ 07:23am


I don't know if the Carpenters are really a worthy induction to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame but not because of their talent or lack of talent. They were just a completely different type of act. A brother and sister team with esteemed talent, the beautiful melancholy voice of Karen, the arranging talent of her brother Richard and their sting of hits doesn't neccesarily mean they should be in the hall of fame. And what does it matter? They have left their wonderful legacy on record. Their are other acts in the Hall that I have no reason why they are there. But the Carpenters quality of recordings, vocal dubbing and instrument placements will never be repeated. The quality of their music used to be taken for granted and sometimes mocked but now they are considered timeless and one of a kind. Their talent doesn't come around a lot in our lifetime. So does it really matter if they never get in there? Not to me. Their exquisite music will last till the end of time.

Posted by Brent Hancock on Saturday, 05.26.12 @ 23:50pm


Am I the only one who hates it when in the middle of a perfectly good song they do that thing where karen and he bro's voice go together and they put on some weird effect? it sounds so fake and wrong!

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 06.13.12 @ 15:07pm


Am I the only one who hates it when in the middle of a perfectly good song they do that thing where karen and he bro's voice go together and they put on some weird effect? it sounds so fake and wrong!

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 06.13.12 @ 15:07pm

Yes.

Posted by Pocholo on Friday, 10.19.12 @ 12:00pm


Yeah you're the only one GFW lol

Posted by Tim on Friday, 10.19.12 @ 13:24pm


per Wiki:

1975 – In Playboy magazine's annual opinion poll, its readers voted Carpenter the Best Rock Drummer of the year. Apparently this greatly displeased John Bonham from Led Zeppelin as he came in second. He was quoted as saying: "I'd like to have it publicised that I came in after Karen Carpenter in the Playboy drummer poll! She couldn't last ten minutes with a Zeppelin number."

so true, but their passion for playing the drums are the same, your fans truly missed both of you.

Posted by akeem on Friday, 01.11.13 @ 19:57pm


The most successful American music act of the 1970's, with one of the greatest female vocalists ever, who have influenced many relevant artists and over 100 million units sold. Seems like a no-brainer...and yet, nothing. Ridiculously political.

Posted by Dena on Wednesday, 04.10.13 @ 13:18pm


Karen had the most soulful and perfect voice I have ever heard, and I am old enough to have heard ALL the greats at one time or another!! They deserve, without any reservation, nomination to the HOF. It's more than just a little disgusting that they have been overlooked for all of this time.

Posted by shosho on Monday, 06.3.13 @ 16:50pm


Don't agree with her having the best voice, but yeah they deserve in.

Posted by GFW on Tuesday, 06.4.13 @ 07:01am


She had the saddest voice I ever heard.

Posted by astrodog on Tuesday, 06.4.13 @ 07:13am


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