Kraftwerk

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1995 (The 1996 Induction Ceremony)

Nominated in: 2003   2013   

Previously Considered? Yes  what's this?


Inducted into Rock Hall Revisited in 1999 (ranked #40) .


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Autobahn (1974)
Trans-Europe Express (1977)
The Man-Machine (1978)
Computer World (1981)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Autobahn (1974)
Trans-Europe Express (1977)
The Model (1978)
The Robots (1978)
Computer Love (1981)

Kraftwerk @ Wikipedia

Kraftwerk Videos

Will Kraftwerk be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

113 comments so far (post your own)

Aren't even listened to much by the indie crowd, but their one of the forgotten influences......opened up whole new genres.

Posted by Casper on Wednesday, 01.17.07 @ 16:13pm


Yep, they're responsible for starting more genres than almost anybody. Every other band that did nearly as much for expanding rock is already in.

Posted by tucker on Tuesday, 01.23.07 @ 10:49am


Kraftwerk was mentioned in the Depeche Mode discussion, and two of us agree that Kraftwerk were extremely influential. I'm trying to imagine how the powers that be would react to a Kraftwerk induction, however. Glad to see that they were nominated in 2003.

Posted by Ontario Emperor on Thursday, 05.17.07 @ 18:26pm


Fuck that shit!!! Kraftwerk's music has been way more influencial than the Beatles.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 05.31.07 @ 11:34am


I agree with you. You're absolutely right. The Beatles do suck!!! Big time!!! I'm just kidding. How can anyone forget "Abbey Road". Brilliant.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 05.31.07 @ 13:50pm


Hey, let's talk about a band that doesn't suck. Is that cool with you privates in the KISS Army? No? Tough titties then, because KISS suck and Kraftwerk don't. As the first wave of electronic music that came to be known as Krautrock, their influence was untold. Such luminaries as John Lydon nee Rotten, Brian Eno, and David Bowie cite them as huge influences. Their robotic deconstruction of pop and rock are still heard everywhere, especially in the rave subculture. But yeah, no, they totally don't have a shitty movie.

Posted by Kit on Thursday, 06.28.07 @ 21:05pm


I keep hearing so much about Kraftwerk - are they listenable?
What was Krautrock?

Posted by shawn mc on Thursday, 06.28.07 @ 23:08pm


I guess you could call Kraftwerk proto-techno, if you wanted.

The albums Bowie made with Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois--their hands are totally over those, especially Low.

They aren't really that acessible, those who love them found their disciples first. No one starts with Kraftwerk and works forward, so to speak.

I guess the album I'd reccomend would be 1977's Trans-Europe Express.

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 00:25am


"They aren't really that acessible" - yet HOF material...hmmm

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 05:37am


"I guess the album I'd reccomend would be 1977's Trans-Europe Express."

What about Autobahn?

Posted by shawn mc on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 08:55am


1981's "Computer World" is their biggest seller. It's more fun to compute!!!

Posted by Joe-Skee on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 10:42am


"No one starts with Kraftwerk and works forward, so to speak."

If I wanted to understand the chronology of their influence, who would I start with and move beackwards through? Make me a map.

Posted by shawn mc on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 12:37pm


""They aren't really that acessible" - yet HOF material...hmmm"

See that? That's the point. Look at it fly. If you are responsible for an entire family of genres as Kraftwerk are with electronica and its offshoots, then we can overlook your albums sounding weird on first listen. That's kind of how these things work.

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 20:13pm


Xiu Xiu would be the Kraftiest modern artist I can think of. Depeche Mode and New Order were the first bands to get me out of the view that anything remotely synthetic-sounding sucked, and they were big Kraftwerk disciples, as were a lot of New Wavers. Brian Eno's ambience textures were first hinted at with Kraftwerk. And again, I bring up Bowie's Berlin Trilogy, specifically the second side of Low.

If you like any two of what I listed, check out Kraftwerk.

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 20:20pm


"Unaccessible" music is an oxymoron and runs counter to what music should be....

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 20:44pm


Oh, and btw, McDonalds, which was founded in 1940, set the stage for a lot more greasy burgers and tacos to follow...now I see how that works

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 20:47pm


Thanks Kit. I recall liking the ambient/soundtrack music for "Risky Business" by Tangerine Dream very much - is that at all similar to Kraftwerk's stuff?

Posted by shawn mc on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 20:50pm


Talking about Kraftwerk and ambient music makes me ask about Brian Eno - where is he on this site?

What are the best Eno albums to pick up for a newbie? Who sang the vocals on his rock/vocal albums? Is he considerd a musician, or strictly a producer?
From what I read, he seems to have had his hand in so much over the years that I have a hard time understanding why he isn't in the Hall - or do I have an incorrect perspective on him?

Posted by shawn mc on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:03pm


""Unaccessible" music is an oxymoron and runs counter to what music should be...."

Not really. Some things are instantly gettable, some things requrie closer listening. You just said that abstract art does not exist, basically.

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:11pm


Tangerine Dream is very similar to Kraftwerk. They were both on the initial Krautrock scene. Can and Neu! are also big players.

Your perspective on Eno lines up with mine. There's no doubt he should be in. I would reccomend Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) from his solo career. He sings vocals, writes the lyrics, and plays most synth parts.

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:17pm


"Oh, and btw, McDonalds, which was founded in 1940, set the stage for a lot more greasy burgers and tacos to follow...now I see how that works"

And that's why Ray Kroc would be in a fictional resturaunt owner HOF. You might not like McDonalds or its offspring, but it was a successful buisness model that was copied ad nauseum. Do we hold the Backstreet Boys against The Beatles, or Poison against Led Zeppelin?

Posted by Kit on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:20pm


" "Unaccessible" music is an oxymoron and runs counter to what music should be."

I struggle with that concept too, Anon. But some of my favorite music now is stuff that didn't grab ahold of me until the third or fourth listen.

Is this just because it became familiar to me and that in itself is much of what CAN go into convincing us that we like something? Or is it because as we listen more we learn to appreciate something on its own terms that didn't reach out and shake our hand and offer us a drink when we first met it?

If something is just too dissonant, whiny, grating, abrasive, noisy, or just too esoteric to "enjoy" then I think it's valid to say, "What's the point of this, then?"

Personally, I have an instinctive repulse for Dinosaur Jr.'s lust for distortion and feedback and have a hard time liking Pavement's vocals and stylings because they both sound vocally like they're trying to be ironically whiny - it's fucking obnoxious to me. And I wish DJr would just shut the fucking chain saw in the speakers down.

And yet they are both darlings of the indie scene.. so what do I know? Art is subjective. Somebody - lots of them - enjoy these bands I find "unaccesible".

Rush, too, has a sound not for everyone. So define the word, y'know? What does unaccesible even mean?

Posted by shawn mc on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:25pm


"Not really. Some things are instantly gettable, some things requrie closer listening. You just said that abstract art does not exist, basically."

Never mentioned abstract art at all...was only talking music. Music can take a few listens, but it should be accessible.

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:48pm


Define "unaccessible" - ask Kit he is the one who said it about KW. To me it is music that is not very enjoyable to listen to - shrieking, annoying, lacking a melody, offensive.

Which of course to me is different than music that takes a few listens, as Shawn said, like Rush's music.

Posted by Anonymous on Friday, 06.29.07 @ 21:52pm


Kraftwerk's electronic/synth music is a hell of a lot older than Eno's music. Tangerine Dream did the "Risky Business" score in 1983. Kraftwerk debut in 1971 on the album simply titled "Kraftwerk 1".

Posted by Joe-Skee on Saturday, 06.30.07 @ 08:37am


Hey Guys!!! YouTube is filled with plenty of classic Kraftwerk videos, songs, and live concert perfomances. Check 'em out!!!

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 07.10.07 @ 12:13pm


Kraftwerk influenced synth pop, new wave, techno, dance, electronica, hip hop.

Posted by Kula bácsi on Sunday, 07.22.07 @ 00:25am


Seriously, Krafwerk NEEDS to be in. They are BY FAR the most sampled techno/electronic artist of all time - The Hall has a large number of "Influences" and I can't think of anyone from the 70's that has had a bigger influence than Kraftwerk. Their music was the staple of some of the extremely early DJ/Mixers of the early 80's and is still sampled today by artits from all genres of music.

On another note: Come on - Let's show Canada a little lve and get RUSH in there!

Posted by Jeff J on Friday, 08.31.07 @ 11:05am


There are plenty Canadians inducted already, especially when compared to acts from continental Europe. Every European act inducted is either British or Irish. Time to get some Germans inducted!

Posted by Jelly on Thursday, 10.25.07 @ 04:51am


Metal on Metal

Posted by Joe-Skee on Monday, 10.29.07 @ 10:48am


Excellent band and certainly innovative. I have a feeling their lack of commercial success will keep them out. But I would have no problem if they were voted in.

Posted by Dameon on Wednesday, 11.7.07 @ 17:41pm


Liam...I gave the original 22 minute version of Autobahn to my fiance's 15 yr. old daughter...the look om her face was priceless when I told her the year it was recorded. She just loved it...another convert!!!

Posted by Terry on Monday, 02.25.08 @ 14:41pm


Not many kids listen to the Krafties anymore. Shame, because if they did, they wouldn't listen to any of these simpleton DJs making 'music' (ie sh*t with a beat). I like some electronica nowadays, but alot of it is corporate crap aimed at kids and drug-addicts.

Posted by Liam on Monday, 02.25.08 @ 15:08pm


Kraftwerk aren't accessible? I loved them when I was a kid. They made sweet pocket calculator pop. Then I came to the US and heard all this hullabaloo over their having deconstructed rock and the yadda yadda yaddas of American pseudo-intellectualism. Go listen to Kraftwerk (and Giorgio, Cerrone, Supermax, Macho, and La Bionda) through the ears of a child.

Posted by Jayzterbasster on Tuesday, 03.11.08 @ 01:46am


In the next few years they will have to start recognizing electronic music, and therefore they will have to induct Kraftwerk.

Posted by Poo on Sunday, 03.16.08 @ 18:42pm


Electric in its influence, they will eventually be acknowledged. Hopefully sooner than later.

Posted by JasonP on Tuesday, 03.18.08 @ 12:18pm


In the next few years they will have to start recognizing electronic music, and therefore they will have to induct Kraftwerk.

Posted by Poo on Sunday, 03.16.08 @ 18:42pm

Why will they have to start recognizing it? Is there some rules and regulations that they must abide by? As far as I can see, this nominating group beats to the drum of Wenner alone.

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 03.27.08 @ 05:36am


David Bowie and Iggy Pop should induct them.

Posted by Gregory Pietsch on Thursday, 03.27.08 @ 13:49pm


I am taking this conversation to where it belongs.

But Kraftwerk were just an absolute milestone in music. Imagine taking them out of the picture, and what happens? Many New Wavers (Talking Heads, New Order, Depeche Mode, Human League, pretty much anyone who laid their hands on a synth.....) just vanish. - Liam

If by saying that anyone who touched the synth owes a debt to Kraftwerk, then would Kraftwerk owe Keith Emerson for his work with ELP or Townsend and his useage of the Moog during Baba O'Reilly? Or is that taken out of the picture, because it was still basically Hard Rock? Just looking for anyone's opinion really.

Posted by Dameon on Thursday, 04.3.08 @ 12:21pm


I misspoke. Forgot "after them".

Posted by Liam on Thursday, 04.3.08 @ 12:24pm


Kraftwerk should be inducted. They didn't just advance electronic music by using the new electronic instruments of the 70s to their full potential, they worked with the companies making them to improve them further. Look at their 'home made' looking synthetic drums you see in their early performances... Kraftwerk built them themselves! I haven't heard of many other groups in our time that have created instruments or helped advance the equipment used to make music other than Kraftwerk. They also never released anything they regret making, or do anything objectionable. They also never 'sold out' to corporate greed, such as sell their songs to appear in movies, TV shows or worst of all, TV commercials.

If they aren't inducted sooner or later, then this so called 'hall of fame' should be redefined to explain clearly why electronic music is practically banned. As usual, the electronic music people will simply do their own thing, and perhaps create their own hall of fame. Why America mostly 'hates' electronic music since the early 90s is really beyond me.

BTW, Kraftwerk has steadily grown in popularity in recent years and have gone on many sold out tours around the world. There aren't really any other electronic music groups that have managed to do so...

Posted by Joey on Tuesday, 05.27.08 @ 21:53pm


They deserve it. Everything Kraftwerk did was done with class. Innovators, totally out on their own, inventing a new style of pop. I remember waiting in anticipation of their album Computer World in 1981.

Posted by Jeff on Tuesday, 07.8.08 @ 09:41am


# Autobahn - Autobahn, 1974
# Trans Europa Express - Trans Europa Express, 1977
# Die Roboter - Die Mensch-Maschine, 1978
...

There is simply no explanation required to define their work as one of the most innovative and influential in music history.

Posted by Faktum on Wednesday, 07.16.08 @ 08:49am


Interestingly enough, I actually started on Kraftwerk and found their style pleasing and interesting long before I listened to any other electronic music. Whenever I listen to new music that ranges from techno to rap, I am always hearing Kraftwerkian (?) melodies.

Posted by ZM on Friday, 08.1.08 @ 18:33pm


Their first all electronic top 40 hit Autobahn in 1974, they started and influenced all Synthesizer New Wave Music of the 80's. They began Techno & Electronica, setting the pace for Break Beat, House, Trance, Gothic Industrial, and every other synthesizer based dance music genre. Their percussionist, Wolfgang Flur actually invented the electronic drum so the band could appear with all electric instruments on stage.

No other band has influenced music in the last 30 years as Kraftwerk has. So fantastic they are still that of the 70 bands represented at the Coachella Festival in 2008, they placed as the #3 headliner performing just one band before Prince, the headliner.

Posted by Fabio_Lite on Saturday, 08.23.08 @ 14:08pm


Their first all electronic top 40 hit Autobahn in 1974, they started and influenced all Synthesizer New Wave Music of the 80's. They began Techno & Electronica, setting the pace for Break Beat, House, Trance, Gothic Industrial, and every other synthesizer based dance music genre. Their percussionist, Wolfgang Flur actually invented the electronic drum so the band could appear with all electric instruments on stage.

No other band has influenced music in the last 30 years as Kraftwerk has. So fantastic they are still that of the 70 bands represented at the Coachella Festival in 2008, they placed as the #3 headliner performing just one band before Prince, the headliner.

Posted by Fabio_Lite on Saturday, 08.23.08 @ 14:41pm


Inventors of that electronic.... robotic sound. Danger !!! Will Robinson !!!

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 09.18.08 @ 16:58pm


HMMM THEY SOUND BETTER THAN OK.. !!! BUT TO ME IT JUST MORE OF THE SAME OLD SAME OLD.. Good but boring...Like wake me up when it is over...

Posted by mrxyz on Saturday, 12.6.08 @ 22:09pm


Yes.

This is a no brainer. Kraftwerk's innovations have infiltrated the entire popular music spectrum. That's more than enough.

Posted by Jonas on Tuesday, 12.16.08 @ 04:52am


They suck. all the electronic shit sucks terribly.

Posted by AirSuppleee on Friday, 12.19.08 @ 04:18am


Krafwerk deserve to be in but the Beatles beat them to it. Mixing Electronic music with rock music. "Tomorrow Never Knows” which displays some radical use of tape manipulation. It features Lennon singing over a planned cacophony created by layering tape loops, sped up tape loops, backward tapes over metronomic drum and bass pattern. Karl Bartos said the Beatles did it all before we did.

Posted by Sydfloyd on Monday, 01.19.09 @ 10:54am


Kraftwerk = Hard Suckage. This is very possibly the most mindless crap that has ever been presented as music. Worse than ABBA. The fact that no one produces this kind of crap any more is testament to the fact that it's pure crap.

Posted by Z. Roe on Monday, 02.16.09 @ 18:44pm


With all the talk about how MUCH influence Kraftwerk had, nobody's stopped to think about whether or not this influence is a GOOD thing.

If a minor footnote-act (and only the most blinded die-hard would ever consider Kraftwerk to be anything else), has a large influence, but that influence is a lot of, to put it frankly, crappy music, then is it really something to be celebrated?

The forerunners of synth-pop? That's a legacy of shame, not something to celebrate.

I realize there's a vocal minority here who will disagree, but the bottom line is that the music of the last 30 years would either be unchanged or would be BETTER if Kraftwerk had never existed.

Posted by Dean on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 13:40pm


realize there's a vocal minority here who will disagree, but the bottom line is that the music of the last 30 years would either be unchanged or would be BETTER if Kraftwerk had never existed.

Posted by Dean on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 13:40pm


I agree to the most part..
It is a shame with all the new technology that music has not go forwad by light years,,,It seems they are letting the robots run the music world,,

Some not all have lost the feel/soul of music....
Music should be a extention of the human inter being...Music needs the art,love ,pain beauty.happness, sadness, perfection, hope, lost,and the mistake in us... This will pass,, just let IT take ITS course... We shall return to the IT in us.


Posted by mrxyz on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 13:52pm


Interesting thought and not without its merit. But I would say that although new doesn't always mean better; it is still something that we need to listen for. I am not a fan of Kraftwerk, but I certainly see their importance and have no problem with them being inducted one day.

Posted by Dameon on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 13:56pm


"With all the talk about how MUCH influence Kraftwerk had, nobody's stopped to think about whether or not this influence is a GOOD thing."--Dean

Problem with this, is that "good" is a subjective term. What one person says is good, another person absolutely hates.

"If a minor footnote-act (and only the most blinded die-hard would ever consider Kraftwerk to be anything else), has a large influence, but that influence is a lot of, to put it frankly, crappy music, then is it really something to be celebrated?"--Dean

That's almost the exact same logic that Blender used when it claimed Sgt. Pepper's was one of the worst things to happen to music. That brilliance inspires crappy take-offs does not negate the brilliance of the original.

"The forerunners of synth-pop? That's a legacy of shame, not something to celebrate."--Dean

While I agree, it's still a subjective opinion.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 15:33pm


I remember hearing "Autobahn" for the first time when I was a freshman in college (circa 1975), and thinking how unique it was. Techno (Electronic, etc...) is a genre that has gotten very diluted over the years...not a lot of pioneering going on. Some of the artists involved in the earlier days were pretty incredible musicians, but I think nowadays the electronic aspect of it is outweighing the musicianship.

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 17:24pm


I don't know what you mean by the "electronic" aspect, but I think if anything's outweighing the musicianship, it's the need to make it danceable. I don't know how many would actually listen to electronica if you couldn't DANCE to it, because OMFG, dancing is like the most important thing! Especially because a good dancer is a good lover, and NOTHING in life is more important than sex, y'know? It's like totally!!

Posted by Philip on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 17:32pm


I guess what I meant was people are letting the computers do most of the work...does that make sense? Back in the day (don't you hate that phrase), I'm not totally sure Giorgio Moroder made "Chase" for the movie "Midnight Express" with the idea it would be good to dance to, but it sure got a lot of play in the clubs. Another I can think of would be "Chariots of Fire" by Vangelis (which I got totally sick of)...definitely can't dance to that.

But you're right...most of it is that uptempo repetitive, mindless "droning"...UGH!!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 17:41pm


Ok. I see what you mean. Yeah, computers changed a whole lot. Even when computers were primitive (I remember reading a computer musician credit on Paul McCartney's "Ou Est Le Soleil?"), it started happening.

I think a lot of it had to do with producers wanting the limelight themselves. The good producers have become superstars in electronica (like Peter Rauhofer).

I gotta admit, though, I like the mindless droning of electronica. I just like the sounds... it kinda reminds me of the hours I spent on my old Nintendo playing Mario and Zelda. lol No seriously, for me, it's just fun music that sometimes goes a little too long. And I cannot dance. Seriously.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 18:12pm


Especially because a good dancer is a good lover, and NOTHING in life is more important than sex, y'know? It's like totally!! (Philip)

At least I can agree with this statement - fer sure!

Posted by Dameon on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 19:31pm


Like, totally, I know, for real. That's hot.

Posted by Philip on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 19:37pm


I remember that stuff...when your steady girl asked if you "made love" with anyone before them, and you would say "no" while thinking "but I sure @#$%&* the *&#$% out of a few..."

Posted by Gitarzan on Monday, 03.16.09 @ 20:04pm


sure is lots of attention for an act that's a minor footnote, at best

an afterthought, except for a few geeky fanboys

you laugh at those who vote for madonna and the monkees, then you go act like just as big fanboys here, with your holier then thou, smug, indy-crap

hypocrites

Posted by joe c on Friday, 03.27.09 @ 11:35am


Really thought late '75 album RADIO-ACTIVITY was very edgy in terms of innovation and unique radio-inspiration; often overlooked in their catalouge in my opinion. Gets lost between AUTOBAHN and TRANS-EUROPE EXPRESS.

Posted by audi joe on Wednesday, 04.15.09 @ 23:33pm


Wow, this page has become filled with stupidity.

First, what is "good" music? How do you judge what is good music? How do you judge good popular music? How do you judge this art form considering how other art forms (painting, sculpture, film) are judged?

Second, Kraftwerk's influence is far beyond synthpop. Most modern electronic music goes back to them. Every rock band that has utilized elements of electronic/electronic dance could be counted as products of Kraftwerk's influence. That's A LOT of people, folks.

Third, how would music be any better if Kraftwerk never existed? This is absurd. I'd like to hear more on this issue.

Fourth, why does actual human musicianship matter? The artists the detractors here are thinking of probably only compliment simple power chords with a "great guitar solo, man!" Newsflash, that isn't particularly accomplished music by academic standards. All the musicianship in the world doesn't matter if the piece itself is aesthetically or emotionally void. True, that's loaded with subjectivity, but this gets us back to point #1.

Fifth, why is minimalist and repetitious music inferior? Again, see point #1.

Also, I want to point out that although much modern electronic music descends from techno, it is not required to be thought of as "dance music". I don't dance but I've come to love techno, house, electro, and all manner of that stuff.

Posted by Elastic Man on Thursday, 04.16.09 @ 00:12am


Good grief, Kraftwerk not only practically invented modern electronic music, they actually even designed and built some of their own electronic instruments. Their work is layered and rich. These guys pushed the envelope year after year after year on the development of electronic music when they were virtually the only ones doing it. Kraftwerk studiously created wholly independent, intelligent and innovative aural art for literally decades and are largely responsible for the emergence of a whole new genre of contemporary music.

Posted by Albus on Friday, 12.18.09 @ 09:54am


Hey.

I'm 16 years old, and I got into listening to Kraftwerk on recommendation of my friend. I listened to "She's a Model" and I thought their sound was great. I listened to "Radioactivity" and I got hooked. I hate all the new stuff because it lacks soul and passion, and isn't that what music is about? I'm also a musician and Kraftwerk influenced me into working with synthesizers too.

Great band.

Posted by Aiden on Sunday, 02.28.10 @ 14:56pm


The Stooges just got in to the Hall of Fame so I hope Iggy Pop gives a shout-out to Kraftwerk, since he has cited them as an original influence.

1996 inductee David Bowie was a very early fan, he wrote a song "V2 Schneider" which is an homage to Kraftwerk's Florian Schneider.

And of course Iggy Pop and David Bowie are referenced in Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express.

At a party held in 1977 by Iggy/David, when Kraftwerk entered they were given a 5-minute standing ovation.

Their music has been sampled high and low ever since sampling began. Lots of artists major and minor cite them as innovators and influences. I really don't see how you keep Kraftwerk out of the R&R HOF.

Posted by Dave on Sunday, 03.14.10 @ 01:46am


I think as a German/American i wonder how biased i am..... but well I love Kraftwerk and have from the first time i heard it. I totally agree with the above comment as the list of those who have cited Kraftwerk as a long and legendary one. I think the question raised in earlier posts is does the influence they gave to bands (who may not have known what to do with it) who took it to places where it just wasn't meant to go possibly supersede the legends who sampled and were influenced greatly by them. The site notinhalloffame.com puts them as the number one most deserving band to be in the Hall. I don't know about number one.....but a case could be made couldn't it?

Posted by The_Avenger on Thursday, 03.18.10 @ 08:17am


They influenced New Order, who should definitely be in. If what everyone here is saying is true, then I say definitely, and it just makes the Hall look even more ridiculous. As for Dean's statement... let's not go there. Do we exclude Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains from the Hall because of some of the bland post-grunge that littered the airwaves? Should Metallica and Black Sabbath be kicked out and their deserving contemporaries be locked out because of Disturbed? Michael Jackson and Prince paved the way for Chris Brown, I guess they didn't deserve their inductions. It's infuriating to read that kind of nonsense, but it's also lots of fun tearing people's arguments apart.

Posted by Sam on Sunday, 04.25.10 @ 19:01pm


Listening to The Man Machine as I type this and while their music was quite minimalist and not too acessible, its still bloody good. Anyone wh thinks a band like Kiss should get in before Kraftwerk is mad.

Posted by GFW on Thursday, 05.13.10 @ 11:16am


I respect the undeniable influence Kraftwerk had on many artists in the electronic & new wave genres.

But I don't really think it's "Rock & Roll."

I won't be voting for them as performers. They do deserve to be inducted as influencers.

Posted by classicrocker on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 12:48pm


The problem is that calling Rock & Roll exclusively guitars+bass+drums doesn't really work, considering how far the boundaries have been pushed.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 06.11.10 @ 19:54pm


More drool has been produced as a result of playing Kraftwerk music than at a gathering of 4 million St. Bernard dogs.

Posted by bors on Thursday, 09.30.10 @ 23:07pm


Are you saying that Kraftwerk shouldn't be inducted? If so, who DO you want inducted?

Posted by Sam on Friday, 10.1.10 @ 10:09am


Kraftwerk are one of the most innovative and influential bands ever. I still don't think we've caught up with them technology wise.

Posted by Anton on Sunday, 10.31.10 @ 19:03pm


Kraftwerk are without any doubt the "Godfathers of (popular) electronic music" so it`s a joke that they are not already inducted.

But I guess the voters (mentally) do still live in the earley 70`s and think: rock = guitars, big amps and dudes with long hair.

Posted by Cain on Friday, 11.12.10 @ 07:41am


"But I guess the voters (mentally) do still live in the earley 70`s and think: rock = guitars, big amps and dudes with long hair."

Well, I think the fact that they're letting rap in, seem to be trying to get some disco in and controversially inducted Madonna says otherwise. But there would appear to be an electronic bias. Kraftwerk somehow made it onto the ballot once, but since then... nothing. New Order haven't even been considered yet! I think the one exception to this rule will be Depeche Mode; I think they're too big to be ignored for much longer.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 11.18.10 @ 10:19am


Does Kraftwerk deserve to be inducted? Yes

Will they be? Probably not

Why? Americans have little or no respect for electronic music.

Is the RRHOF politically motivated? Not sure ... Just ask famous rock legends Run-D.M.C or Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five

Posted by John on Thursday, 11.25.10 @ 21:10pm


That's a stupid argumen, Run DMC were huge in the 80's and made arguably the first rock rap song with Walk This Way.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 11.26.10 @ 10:26am


The irony of putting down rappers whilst boosting a left-field, unconventional and very non rock and roll (at least in the normal way) act like Kraftwerk might be lost on you, John, but it's funny in my opinion. The fact that it didn't click with me for two months doesn't make the point any less valid.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 01.6.11 @ 13:42pm


"Does Kraftwerk deserve to be inducted? Yes

Will they be? Probably not

Why? Americans have little or no respect for electronic music." - John

A whole country has no respect for electronic music? That's quite the accusation John, what do you base that on?

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Wednesday, 01.26.11 @ 14:21pm


For those that have asked, I suggest getting into Kraftwerk with 2005's live "Minimum-Maximum". It serves a perfect introduction. 2 CD's 190 minutes of music.

Posted by Erix on Saturday, 02.19.11 @ 10:59am


@ Sam

I can`t see where the user "John" has put down rappers. In my opinion he has pointed a the similarities between the so called "rap question" [which has sparked some heated debates here] and the discussions about electronic music.

And I think it is true: These debates have a political subtext.

Posted by Twilife on Monday, 03.7.11 @ 08:01am


That's just the way I read it, as the "rock legends" statement in the context of Run DMC and Grandmaster Flash being sarcasm. I see your point though.

Anyone else think we should have a new page titled "The Electronica Question"?

Posted by Sam on Monday, 03.21.11 @ 11:01am


A page for "The Electronica Question?" Maybe, but I'd like for the Rap Question page to be reopened to comments so I can personally respond to every moron who posted on there (not 100% of the people who posted on there are morons, but the majority are).

Also, since I haven't posted this on here yet, I'm now convinced Kraftwerk are the single biggest omission from the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame (I always knew they were at least among the Top 5 most glaring omissions), the only other act who I can think of that could compete for the title of #1 would be Deep Purple (with MC5, King Crimson, Joy Division, T. Rex, Roxy Music, Sonic Youth, Judas Priest and the Zombies rounding out the Top 10, not necessarily in that order). I can post my full Top 30 Biggest Omissions if people want, though I haven't figured out the order yet.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Monday, 03.21.11 @ 11:36am


Tahvo, I made a list of my Top 50 snubs, so I'd love to hear your thoughts on it:

1 Kraftwerk
2 Sonic Youth
3 Deep Purple
4 New Order
5 King Crimson
6 Joy Division
7 The Cure
8 T. Rex
9 Big Star
10 The Buzzcocks
11 Afrika Bambaataa
12 Judas Priest
13 Beastie Boys
14 Husker Du
15 Depeche Mode
16 Black Flag
17 Roxy Music
18 The Smiths
19 Can
20 The Jam
21 Iron Maiden
22 MC5
23 Motorhead
24 Stevie Ray Vaughan
25 New York Dolls
26 Siouxsie and The Banshees
27 The Moody Blues
28 Chicago
29 Def Leppard
30 Yes
31 Rush
32 Thin Lizzy
33 Emerson Lake & Palmer
34 Slayer
35 The Cars
36 Jesus & Mary Chain
37 Red Hot Chili Peppers
38 My Bloody Valentine
39 LL Cool J
40 KISS
41 Cheap Trick
42 Dinosaur Jr.
43 The Dead Kennedys
44 Megadeth
45 Heart
46 Bad Brains
47 The Replacements
48 Pantera
49 The Monkees
50 Motley Crue

I'm thinking of editing it at some point, and I definitely will after next year's inductions. This is tentative in places, but it gives you a basic idea of my thought process regarding the omissions thus far.

Posted by Sam on Thursday, 03.31.11 @ 10:19am


Alright Sam, since you asked: Kraftwerk's #1 for me too, so no argument there, I had actually considered Deep Purple to be the #2 snub, but putting Sonic Youth at #2 is more than fine, especially if Deep Purple rounds out the Top 3. I agree King Crimson should be in the Top 5, I'd put them either at #4 or #5. Personally, I'd switch New Order and Joy Division around but maybe that's just me. I agree T. Rex belongs in the Top 10, and I have no problem seeing the Cure and Big Star (even though I'm not a fan of the latter) in the Top 10 either.

I love the Buzzcocks, though I'm not sure I'd place them as high as #10 as I think they're certainly deserving, but the Hall has already done a semi-decent job with punk so their omission isn't really major, IMO. I understand Afrika Bambaataa's importance but I'm a little skeptical about putting him so high, especially when originators/influences to rap like Gil Scott-Heron are continually ignored. I agree approximately with your placings of Judas Priest, Beastie Boys, Husker Du, Depeche Mode, Black Flag, the Smiths, Can, the Jam, Iron Maiden, Motorhead, Stevie Ray Vaughan and New York Dolls. However, I'd personally place Roxy Music and MC5 higher, (I'm not much of an MC5 fan, but objectively speaking).

For #26 -40, I have no specific issues with other than placing some acts a little lower (Def Leppard, Rush and LL Cool J). It's in #40-50 were it really starts getting down to personal taste and I'd say the majority of lists compiled by different people might look totally different. For example, my Top 50 list probably wouldn't include Heart, Bad Brains and Motley Crue and would include Procol Harum, Link Wray and Sparks.

Some other omissions from your list who would be on my list would include the Zombies (who would be fairly high up, and who I would say is the biggest omission from your list) and the following who would be further down but would still probably be in my Top 50: Dire Straits, Jethro Tull and probably the Kingston Trio (or maybe Peter, Paul & Mary)

Depending on how much room I'd have left over, I'd also consider the following, in no particular order: Neu!, Silver Apples, Dick Dale, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Throbbing Gristle, the Turtles, the Spencer Davis Group, Hawkwind and Gang of Four (obviously others as well, but I would have to do a full list to see hoe much room I have, with these names I mentioned I think I'm already spilling over 50).

In conclusion, keep in mind that if I were to look over your list 3 hours from nor or 3 days from now, I might have substantially different things to say. Similarly, if I were to compile a Top 50 snubs list today, then not look at it again and compile another one a week from now, they would both probably be fairly different (I'm almost certain the Top 10 would remain consistent though). I guess what I'm saying is, don't take my comments too seriously, lol.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 03.31.11 @ 15:03pm


"list to see hoe much"

So close to having no typos, so close!!!

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Thursday, 03.31.11 @ 15:06pm


God... I didn't even realize I'd left the Gang off. As I said, after the next induction I'm going to update it, possibly with your suggestions in mind. Cheers.

Posted by Sam on Friday, 04.1.11 @ 13:50pm


Madonna shouldn't of gotten in before the people who made it possible for her.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 05.20.11 @ 18:11pm


Tahvo Parvianen, well written and yet basically like the voters of the HOF, your wealth od knowledge is falling on closed eyes and empty heads.

Reading The Beatles suck is a couple place in the beginning of the post, it might be the poster's opinion but time and relevancy speaks differently. Now back to Kraftwerk, asides for Can and arguably Faust, there wasn't another Continental Progressive Rock (Krautrock) band more influential than Kraftwerk.

Where would Alternative Rock be without Kraftwerk and Roxy Music. The All Music website has yet to truly dwelve into the bands that were influenced by this band.

Take one group in example, Joy Division which they stated were influenced by The Sex Pistols whom in turn were influenced by Roxy Music. Joy Division began incorporation keyboards into their music due to the Lead singer Ian Curtis constantly listening to Kraftwerk, which in turn influenced their later incarnation New Order.

The "Music" Hall of Fame must rethink their criteria and do what's correct rather than vote with their hearts as the many injustices in regards to some rather obscure bands are being left out of a place where music should be cherished.

Posted by Chuck AzEee! on Sunday, 06.19.11 @ 07:48am


Including a new criteria, critical respect.

Influence: PRetty much every electronic act since has in some way had Kraftwerk to thank.
Influence: The first notable artist to embrace electronics so much.
Critical Respect: They have found themselve's on many lists of grwatest albums and greatest artists, Trans Europe Express is widely regarded as a masterpiece.
Slaes: Apart from a few hits thye never found much commercial success.

Posted by GFW on Monday, 06.20.11 @ 16:27pm


I'd say yes. They helped influence a lot of bands, even the rap record Planet Rock. Kraftwerk was not the only electronic act out their. You had Suicide and the bands that influenced them and other krautrock acts. But I'd say they should be in eventually.

Posted by astrodog on Tuesday, 08.2.11 @ 23:37pm


Kraftwerk are pretty much the most sampled band in the world. Hardly anyone recognizes "Technopop", "The Model", "Die Mensch-Maschine", "Spacelab", "Trans-Europe Express", "Computer Love", or any of their dozens of commonly-sampled songs when they come up in another artist's work, but the influence is still there. Practically every artist in the last 30 years has either sampled, or were influenced by someone who sampled Kraftwerk.

"Tour de France" was featured in the cult classic film Breakin', and it really highlights the often-forgotten influence the band's repetitive but catchy rhythms had on the development of early hip-hop. These influences would later be transferred straight over to house and techno, although practically every genre imaginable has sampled or the hell out of or been influenced by these guys.

And these guys are not without talent. Many, if not most of their instruments were either made from scratch or significantly altered from what was available at the time. As anyone who's worked in the hip-hop industry during the 80s could attest to, all of their recording, playback, and self-sampling took significant time and talent.

Kraftwerk's influence is felt everywhere in music today, including rock (don't forget they were pioneers of Krautrock as well). Unfortunately, the band is highly overlooked and underrated, at least here in the States. Still tinkering away privately in their infamous Kling Klang studio, the group hasn't sought out recognition or fame despite their huge contribution to modern music. They deserve at least an induction to the HoF; of course, I doubt they themselves care either way.

Posted by John on Monday, 08.29.11 @ 16:57pm


On the theme that musical trends tend to involve numerous bands, you had the Silver Apples and Can and Tangerine Dream and NEU! among others. You can add Suicide and even a bit of Roxy Music. And of course you had Moroder whose commercial impact was significant. I still think they deserve induction, but it puts things in perspective.

Posted by astrodog on Tuesday, 10.18.11 @ 17:38pm


Adding ranks to the above ratings

Influence: 40
Innovation: 40
Critical: 30
Sales: 0

equals 110, divided by 1.3... 85. Induction first ballot was vital.

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 10.29.11 @ 14:03pm


On the theme that musical trends tend to involve numerous bands, you had the Silver Apples and Can and Tangerine Dream and NEU! among others. You can add Suicide and even a bit of Roxy Music. And of course you had Moroder whose commercial impact was significant. I still think they deserve induction, but it puts things in perspective.

Posted by astrodog on Tuesday, 10.18.11 @ 17:38pm

Kraftwerk
Can
Neu!
Silver Apples
Suicide
Throbbing Gristle
Tangerine Dream
Giorgio Moroder
Jean Michel Jarre
Bruce Haack
Klaus Schulze
Einstürzende Neubauten
Red Krayola
Isao Tomita
Osamu Kitajima
Faust
Amon Düül II

That's a fairly comprehensive list right there. I think I'm forgetting someone, obviously only a few of these deserve induction but all are worth checking out. Of course to start it all off don't forget to grab a copy of Karlheinz Stockhausen's Kontakte!

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Sunday, 11.6.11 @ 05:25am


You can add Ash Ra Tempel and of course Gary Numan to that list, can't believe I forgot the latter.

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Tuesday, 11.8.11 @ 15:07pm


The truth is alone the album "Trans Europe Express" or the beat of "Numbers" or the invention of the first electronic drumkit would totally justify their induction.

Kraftwerk`s music historical achievement is that they have transfered electronic music from sound labs, esoterical & avant-garde circles into popular culture!

They did not use electronic instruments to reproduce traditional songs or classical music (like Kingsley, Carlos) or to pimp up guitar-rock-songs (like ELO, Yes).

They wanted to create a new and distinctive form of popular electronic music - and this is exactly what they did.

Kraftwerk`s musical legacy is ubiquitous - we hear elements of Kraftwerk`s music in Computer-Games, Commercials, Mobile-Phones, Movie Soundtracks almost every day.

Kraftwerk`s influence on other artists can`t be overstated from Afrika Bambaataa, Grandmaster Flash to Depeche Mode, New Order, Daft Punk to rock acts such as David Bowie, U2, Rammstein, Coldplay and Iggy Pop (and a lot more)

Posted by Smash-Hit on Sunday, 12.4.11 @ 18:22pm


I hope they get in

Posted by Happy on Saturday, 02.18.12 @ 21:34pm


The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is a pathetic JOKE nobody should even take seriously. Good read:

The most frequent criticism of the Hall of Fame is that the nomination process is controlled by a few individuals who are not themselves musicians, such as founder Jann Wenner (who has filled the position of managing editor for Rolling Stone magazine), former foundation director Suzan Evans, and writer Dave Marsh, reflecting their personal tastes rather than the views of the rock world as a whole. A former member of the nominations board once commented that "At one point Suzan Evans lamented the choices being made because there weren't enough big names that would sell tickets to the dinner. That was quickly remedied by dropping one of the doo-wop groups being considered in favor of a 'name' artist...I saw how certain pioneering artists of the '50s and early '60s were shunned because there needed to be more name power on the list, resulting in '70s superstars getting in before the people who made it possible for them. Some of those pioneers still aren't in today."
There is also controversy in the lack of transparency in the selection process. Janet Morrissey of The New York Times wrote, "With fame and money at stake, it’s no surprise that a lot of backstage lobbying goes on. Why any particular act is chosen in any particular year is a mystery to performers as well as outsiders – and committee members say they want to keep it that way." Jon Landau, the chairman of the nominating committee, says they prefer it that way. "We’ve done a good job of keeping the proceedings nontransparent. It all dies in the room."
According to Fox News, petitions with tens of thousands of signatures were also being ignored, and some groups that were signed with certain labels or companies or were affiliated with various committee members have even been put up for nomination with no discussion at all.[20] The committee has also been accused of largely ignoring certain genres.[22] According to author Brett Milano, "entire genres get passed over, particularly progressive rock, '60s Top 40, New Orleans funk and a whole lot of black music."
Another criticism is that too many artists are inducted. In fifteen years, 97 different artists have been inducted.[24] A minimum of 50% of the vote is needed to be inducted; although, the final percentages are not announced and a certain number of inductees (five in 2011) is set before the ballots are shipped.[24] The committee usually nominates a small number of artists (12 in 2010) from an increasing number of different genres. Several voters, including Joel Selvin, himself a former member of the nominating committee, didn't submit their ballots in 2007 because they didn't feel that any of the candidates were truly worthy.
The surviving members of the British punk rock band Sex Pistols, inducted in 2006, refused to attend the ceremony, calling the museum "a piss stain".

Couldn't agree more....

Posted by Mackdown on Monday, 03.26.12 @ 01:48am


The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame inductees who would vote for Kraftwerk

Genesis, Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Alice Cooper, Beastie Boys, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Metallica, RUN-DMC, Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, R.E.M., U2, Blondie, ABBA

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.13.12 @ 09:01am


Skunked again.

Posted by Chalkie on Tuesday, 12.11.12 @ 19:30pm


Kraftwerk's muzak is mind-numbingly boring. Seriously, you can get the same effect by turning on a car engine and just letting it idle for an hour. Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. Sound familiar?

Posted by Bob Borzoi on Friday, 06.21.13 @ 16:50pm


Kraftwerk influenced not only other artists, but entire genres. Enough said.

Posted by James on Saturday, 08.17.13 @ 22:18pm


Since Kraftwerk's first album was out in 1970, Kraftwerk is eligible since 1995 (the 1996 ceremony).

Posted by Florian on Monday, 10.28.13 @ 08:31am


Florian -- thanks for the correction, it has been updated.

Posted by FRL on Monday, 10.28.13 @ 10:31am


Sure, Link Wray invented the power cord, but Kraftwerk invented the first steam powered amplifier and the treble clef.

Posted by Classic Rock on Sunday, 11.3.13 @ 16:57pm


Gosh "GFW", do you just post on this website for the purpose of defending rappers? Even sometimes against posters who weren't insulting any? Do you just look through EVERY random music page for someone who's saying something negative about rap??
Rap fans seriously are, and always will be some of the most annoying people on EARTH.

And "Dean" is also a flea-bitten imbecile.

Posted by jfon on Friday, 02.7.14 @ 09:33am


Oh, and the rap-defeder "Sam" is also a huge idiot. And in fairness to GFW, he did have no rap-related posts in this thread. But I know I've seen him defending random "rap-bashing" posts in other threads.

Posted by jfon on Friday, 02.7.14 @ 09:54am


"Gosh "GFW", do you just post on this website for the purpose of defending rappers? Even sometimes against posters who weren't insulting any? Do you just look through EVERY random music page for someone who's saying something negative about rap??"

it is my cross to bear. it is a heavy one, but like atlas keeping the world up, i shall uphold this burden.

Posted by GFW on Friday, 02.7.14 @ 12:14pm


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