Blood, Sweat & Tears

Not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame

Eligible since: 1993 (The 1994 Induction Ceremony)

Previously Considered? Yes  what's this?


Essential Albums (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3Amazon CD
Blood, Sweat & Tears (1968)
Child Is Father to the Man (1968)

Essential Songs (?)WikipediaAmazon MP3YouTube
Spinning Wheel (1968)
You've Made Me So Very Happy (1968)

Blood, Sweat & Tears @ Wikipedia

Blood, Sweat & Tears Videos

Will Blood, Sweat & Tears be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?
"Musical excellence is the essential qualification for induction."
   

Comments

92 comments so far (post your own)

This band porbably was the best jazz in the 60's Sadly they weren't so popular because bands like The Who, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, andm ore bands were popular.

Posted by Bobby on Wednesday, 06.27.07 @ 05:33am


Pop/Jazz-Rock !!!

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 06.27.07 @ 11:33am


Blood, Sweat & Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis.

-Rolling Stone


"Blood, Sweat and Tears is embarrassing to me. They try to be so hip, they're not ... I know what they try to do: they try to get Basie's sound with knowledge."

—Miles Davis

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.6.08 @ 21:07pm


Oh, excuse me! You people at the Rock Hall are so elite and of a higher pedigree.

This is an excerpt from Miles Davis' biography at the Rock Hall. Notice the indirect reference to Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago in the last sentenced:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period. But his forward-thinking sensibility, insatiably curious muse and eagerness to move music into uncharted realms made him a contemporary musician, irrespective of genre. The bond he established with rock’s more inquisitive listeners at that time carried through to his death in 1991. Moreover, his career-long example of pushing the boundaries has influenced many of rock’s leading lights, particularly those who eschewed the status quo for musical explorations on rock’s more experimental tip. He possessed one of the most gifted and curious minds in music history, and compromise was not in his blood.

COMPROMISE!!

This is why Blood, Sweat & Tears is not in the Rock Hall!

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 01.10.08 @ 07:53am


I am sort of shocked that they are not in as well as Chicago and others. I know they had a list of major hits but they were not around long enough they were more of a understated band. I will always think they are a hall of fame band regardless they make it or not.

Posted by Ronnie W. Davis on Tuesday, 01.29.08 @ 10:47am


B,S,and T's album "Blood Sweat and Tears" featuring such hit songs as "Spinning Wheel" and "You Make Me So Very Happy" won The Album Of The Year award at The Grammys in 1969.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 01.29.08 @ 11:01am


Child Is Father To The Man is considered to be one of the greatest-FLAWLESS albums ever produced!! ***** 5 STARS! Even Rolling Stone Magazine admits it!!

One of The Greatest Jazz-Rock Fusion albums of all time. Bitches' Brew by Miles Davis is # 1 and Chicago Transit Authority is # 3.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 01.29.08 @ 11:28am


This is why Blood, Sweat & Tears is not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame:

Group Members

Al Kooper
Joe Henderson
Steve Khan
Fred Lipsius
Tom "Bones" Malone
Ron McClure
Lew Soloff
Mike Stern
Larry Willis
Randy Bernsen
David Clayton-Thomas
Jerry Lacroix
Don Alias
Bobby Doyle
Dave Bargeron
Randy Brecker
Forrest Buchtel
Bruce Cassidy
Bobby Colomby
Vern Dorge
Bob Economou
Jim Fielder
Joe Giorgianni
Dick Halligan
Jerry Hyman
Steve Katz
Tony Klatka
Roy McCurdy
Lou Marini
David Piltch
Earl Seymour
Neil Stubenhaus
Bill Tillman
Danny Trifan
George Wadenius
Jerry Weiss
Chuck Winfield
Chris Albert
Jerry Fisher

Posted by Roy on Monday, 05.26.08 @ 17:43pm


Currently, there are only three references to Blood, Sweat & Tears at the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. The biographies of John Simon, Clive Davis and Miles Davis:

Clive Davis:

Clive Davis helped shape the modern music industry as president of CBs’ Records Division and as president and founder of Arista Records. A Brooklyn native, he joined CBS as a lawyer in 1960. He served as president from 1967 to 1973, turning Columbia and its affiliated labels into a major force in rock and roll with his prescient signings. He marks his attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967 as “the creative turning point in my life.” As a direct result of Monterey, Big Brother and the Holding Company (featuring Janis Joplin) and the Electric Flag were brought to Columbia, and Davis went after more of the new generation of rock acts in its wake. Other artists signed to Columbia under his watch included Blood, Sweat & Tears, Santana, Boz Scaggs, Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith and Billy Joel.

1967: Clive Davis’ attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival results in his first signings to Columbia Records: Janis Joplin, Laura Nyro and the Electric Flag. Blood, Sweat & Tears and the Chambers Brothers follow.

Miles Davis:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period. But his forward-thinking sensibility, insatiably curious muse and eagerness to move music into uncharted realms made him a contemporary musician, irrespective of genre. The bond he established with rock’s more inquisitive listeners at that time carried through to his death in 1991. Moreover, his career-long example of pushing the boundaries has influenced many of rock’s leading lights, particularly those who eschewed the status quo for musical explorations on rock’s more experimental tip. He possessed one of the most gifted and curious minds in music history, and compromise was not in his blood.

John Simon:

John Simon Comes to the Rock Hall for “From Songwriters to Soundmen: The People Behind the Hits”

John Simon produced the music of Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Band; Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen; Blood, Sweat and Tears and many more.

CLEVELAND (March 5, 2007) - On March 21, John Simon will visit Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum to give an intimate account of his career producing some of the greatest music of all time. Simon, always a musician’s producer, will also perform songs from his remarkable solo recordings.

Simon will be at the Rock Hall to participate in “From Songwriters to Soundmen: The People Behind the Hits” program. The program gives Rock Hall audiences an inside look at aspects of the music business that are often concealed from view. The series is held on the third Wednesday of every month.

An Evening with producer John Simon
Wednesday, March 21, 7 p.m., 4th Floor Theater
This event is free with a reservation. Please email edu@rockhall.org to RSVP. If you do not have access to email, please call 216.515.8426.

After attending Princeton, John Simon joined Columbia Records as a producer-in-training. His first pop record was Red Rubber Ball by the Cyrkle. He went on to produce some of the biggest records of the 1960s: Cheap Thrills by Big Brother and the Holding Company; most of Bookends by Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen’s first album; the first album by Blood, Sweat and Tears and the first two albums by the Band.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.15.08 @ 09:33am


Rolling Stone Magazine has two quotes on Blood, Sweat & Tears on their website:

Blood, Sweat & Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis.

—Rolling Stone


"Blood, Sweat and Tears is embarrassing to me. They try to be so hip, they're not ... I know what they try to do: they try to get Basie's sound with knowledge."

—Miles Davis


Currently, there are only three references to Blood, Sweat & Tears at the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. The biographies of Clive Davis, Miles Davis and John Simon:

Clive Davis:

Clive Davis helped shape the modern music industry as president of CBs’ Records Division and as president and founder of Arista Records. A Brooklyn native, he joined CBS as a lawyer in 1960. He served as president from 1967 to 1973, turning Columbia and its affiliated labels into a major force in rock and roll with his prescient signings. He marks his attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967 as “the creative turning point in my life.” As a direct result of Monterey, Big Brother and the Holding Company (featuring Janis Joplin) and the Electric Flag were brought to Columbia, and Davis went after more of the new generation of rock acts in its wake. Other artists signed to Columbia under his watch included Blood, Sweat & Tears, Santana, Boz Scaggs, Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith and Billy Joel.

1967: Clive Davis’ attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival results in his first signings to Columbia Records: Janis Joplin, Laura Nyro and the Electric Flag. Blood, Sweat & Tears and the Chambers Brothers follow.

Miles Davis:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period. But his forward-thinking sensibility, insatiably curious muse and eagerness to move music into uncharted realms made him a contemporary musician, irrespective of genre. The bond he established with rock’s more inquisitive listeners at that time carried through to his death in 1991. Moreover, his career-long example of pushing the boundaries has influenced many of rock’s leading lights, particularly those who eschewed the status quo for musical explorations on rock’s more experimental tip. He possessed one of the most gifted and curious minds in music history, and compromise was not in his blood.

John Simon:

John Simon produced the music of Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Band; Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen; Blood, Sweat and Tears and many more.

After attending Princeton, John Simon joined Columbia Records as a producer-in-training. His first pop record was Red Rubber Ball by the Cyrkle. He went on to produce some of the biggest records of the 1960s: Cheap Thrills by Big Brother and the Holding Company; most of Bookends by Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen’s first album; the first album by Blood, Sweat and Tears and the first two albums by the Band.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.15.08 @ 13:29pm


It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period.


Totally false and inane comment. If he really believes that, he's ignorant about Miles' music of that period.

I think the writer was trying to imply that BS&T and Chicago didn't get in because being a major proponent of a music style that was "briefly popular" doesn't qualify them for the RRHOF and rationalized Miles getting in by claiming that he didn't play this kind of music anyway.

It's a pretty ridiculous reach, IMO.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.15.08 @ 14:19pm


I really liked this band when they were making records (I was about 9 - 13) in their heyday. They did have many members, due to the nature of the group (session muscians making their own music), but they really had some great songs.

If Chicago should be in (and I'm on record as saying the 'Terry Kath years' Chicago should be inducted), then this band should also be in.

Posted by Paul in KY on Wednesday, 07.16.08 @ 13:47pm


I'm still trying to find the first and second editions of the Rolling Stone Album Guides at local libraries.

The RollingStone Album Guide, 3rd and 4th Editions, 1992 & 2004:

Frighteningly pretentious, BS&T were fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that compromised Miles Davis and nearly killed off Jeff Beck. Convinced that rock & roll just wasn’t bright enough, these high-culture bullyboys figured that what was missing was brass. Horns, of course, had been a brilliant mainstay for Little Richard and James Brown, but what BS&T had in mind was fat big band—Woody Herman, Glenn Miller, et al. Soon staging a saxophone shootout with contemporary rivals Chicago, BS&T delivered hits that indeed featured breathtaking arrangements and playing—but their virtuosity was wholly misbegotten.

Dylan sideman and ex-Blues Project member Al Kooper founded BS&T, but held on only long enough for their first, and best, record. Featuring such classy writers as Harry Nilsson and Randy Newman, Child Is Father to the Man showed a band not yet gripped by terminal condescension; it’s an elegant, ambitious record. Then came David Clayton-Thomas. Bearish, amiable, and deeply desirous of the chintz mantle earned by being “a great entertainer,” C-T was a scenery chewer of a singer, radiating bogus black soul and arrogant “chops.” Bellowing “And When I Die,” “Spinning Wheel,” and “You’ve Made Me So Very Happy,” he made their second album hit-heavy and hollow—and primed them for a career of unintended Vegas-aspiring. BS&T is best represented by an album of its live work—the band really gets to stretch out and, even if the material is still inflated, there are passages of crack playing as expert as, say, the Johnny Carson-era Tonight Show orchestra.


The RollingStone Jazz & Blues Album Guide, Edited by John Swenson, 1999

Blood, Sweat and Tears started out in 1967 as a fusion of jazz, blues and folk elements spearheaded by vocalist/arranger Al Kooper and guitarist Steve Katz from the groundbreaking 1960s group the Blues Project. Its stellar cast of young jazz-session players included drummer Bobby Colomby, saxophonist Fred Lipsius and trumpeters Randy Brecker and Lew Soloff.

Child Is Father to the Man is an ingenious blend of elements that merits praise if only for introducing the Beatles generation to the music of Charlie Parker. It is a canny melding of pop song structures with jazz arrangements that proved to be very influential.

By the time of Blood, Sweat and Tears the formula had evolved into a pop juggernaut behind the histrionic vocals of David Clayton-Thomas. The result was a string of hit singles—“Spinning Wheel,” “And When I Die” et cetera—spun through a gorgeous concept album. But the spontaneity had been hammered out of the music, and the group went on to more commercial success offset by increasingly self-parodistic music.

Rolling Stone Magazine has two quotes on Blood, Sweat & Tears on their website:

Blood, Sweat & Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis and nearly killed off Jeff Beck.

—Rolling Stone


"Blood, Sweat and Tears is embarrassing to me. They try to be so hip, they're not ... I know what they try to do: they try to get Basie's sound with knowledge."

—Miles Davis


Currently, there are only three references to Blood, Sweat & Tears at the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. The biographies of Clive Davis, Miles Davis and John Simon:

Clive Davis:

Clive Davis helped shape the modern music industry as president of CBS’ Records Division and as president and founder of Arista Records. A Brooklyn native, he joined CBS as a lawyer in 1960. He served as president from 1967 to 1973, turning Columbia and its affiliated labels into a major force in rock and roll with his prescient signings. He marks his attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967 as “the creative turning point in my life.” As a direct result of Monterey, Big Brother and the Holding Company (featuring Janis Joplin) and the Electric Flag were brought to Columbia, and Davis went after more of the new generation of rock acts in its wake. Other artists signed to Columbia under his watch included Blood, Sweat & Tears, Santana, Boz Scaggs, Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith and Billy Joel.

1967: Clive Davis’ attendance at the Monterey Pop Festival results in his first signings to Columbia Records: Janis Joplin, Laura Nyro and the Electric Flag. Blood, Sweat & Tears and the Chambers Brothers follow.

Miles Davis:

It is important to note that Miles Davis did not make jazz-rock - a briefly popular hybrid in the late Sixties and early Seventies, whose chief proponents were Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago. Davis played jazz, period. But his forward-thinking sensibility, insatiably curious muse and eagerness to move music into uncharted realms made him a contemporary musician, irrespective of genre. The bond he established with rock’s more inquisitive listeners at that time carried through to his death in 1991. Moreover, his career-long example of pushing the boundaries has influenced many of rock’s leading lights, particularly those who eschewed the status quo for musical explorations on rock’s more experimental tip. He possessed one of the most gifted and curious minds in music history, and compromise was not in his blood.

John Simon:

John Simon produced the music of Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Band; Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen; Blood, Sweat and Tears and many more.

After attending Princeton, John Simon joined Columbia Records as a producer-in-training. His first pop record was Red Rubber Ball by the Cyrkle. He went on to produce some of the biggest records of the 1960s: Cheap Thrills by Big Brother and the Holding Company; most of Bookends by Simon and Garfunkel; Leonard Cohen’s first album; the first album by Blood, Sweat and Tears and the first two albums by the Band.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 06:15am


Roy...so, what are you saying? Your rants are usually about Chicago (the band that will probably never get in as long as Jann Wenner has something to say about it). Was that meant to demean Blood, Sweat, And Tears and bolster Chicago's reputation in that particular style? I usually don't pay any mind to what music critics say, and even though they both used horn sections as embellishments to their sounds (the horns didn't come to the forefront with Chicago any more then BS&T), they were two distinctly different groups.

For my part, I would take older Kool & The Gang, Tower Of Power, or Earth, Wind, & Fire over those two groups anyway.

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 11:23am


The latter three are R&B/Funk groups.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 12:29pm


Joe-Skee...what's your point?

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 12:40pm


Gitarzan,

EWF and Chicago did a couple tours together, so how could you say EWF is better than Chicago. Bill Champlin co-wrote "After the Love Has Gone" with David Foster, so EWF and Chicago have a mutual appreciation for each other. BS&T didn't stay together long enough to tour with EWF.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 13:36pm


Aaron...I didn't say they were better, I just simply prefer them to Chicago. As far as mutual admiration goes, I'm sure they do. I like some Chicago stuff, I thought Terry Kath was one of the most underrated guitarists ever, and I was just never a big fan of BS&T.

Overall, I'd just rather liten to the three groups I mentioned previously...just a matter of personal taste.

Posted by Gitarzan on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 13:49pm


I'm just letting you all know what's out there!

I want BST inducted!

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.22.08 @ 18:45pm


My point is if you like 70's horn funk groups then you'll love The Crusaders featuring Joe Sample. They've got them all beat. Chicago, BS&T's,and early Kool and The Gang.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 07.23.08 @ 11:34am


Jazz/Funk!!! To be exact.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Wednesday, 07.23.08 @ 11:59am


Joe-Skee...I do like the Crusaders. I don't know if they have them all beat, but I definitely have enjoyed them. I think Ronnie Laws might have been with EWF before the Crusaders.

The point I was making was bands with a strong horn section as a common thread.

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 07.23.08 @ 13:08pm


Another group that I really enjoyed over the years along those lines was Average White Band. They did some real decent stuff, and "A Love Of Your Own" is one of the most haunting, emotional ballads I had ever heard.

Posted by Gitarzan on Wednesday, 07.23.08 @ 19:33pm


That was Ronnie's older brother . Hubert Laws. He was with the "Jazz" Crusaders. He plays the flute. He was with them back in the '60's. He also has some decent solo albums.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 07.24.08 @ 13:09pm


I like AWB too. My favorite cut is "Soul Searching". To me that song is so uplifting and inspirational. Too bad they don't make 'em like that anymore !!! Huh.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Thursday, 07.24.08 @ 14:53pm


Amen to that, brother!!!

Posted by Gitarzan on Thursday, 07.24.08 @ 15:36pm


As a matter of fact. The Crusaders trombonist, Wayne Henderson left the group in 1976, to produce Ronnie Laws "Friends and Strangers" album.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 12:54pm


I think the George Clinton led Parliament's "The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein" disc from '76 has some of the tastiest horn arrangements I've ever heard. Thanks to former JB's Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 13:00pm


Joe-Skee...we can't leave out Ohio Players, "Sweet Sticky Thing" is one of my all-time favorite songs. You're absolutely right about Parliament, and I also like a lot of Maceo Parker's solo efforts.

Didn't he do some work with Prince, too?

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 20:55pm


I remember having "Friends & Strangers" and "Pressure Sensitive" by Ronnie Laws back in the day on vinyl. I attempted to adapt "Always There" to guitar, wore that poor album out...don't know how good it sounded...lol!

It was a kick trying, though!

Posted by Gitarzan on Friday, 07.25.08 @ 21:01pm


I could be wrong but I believe Maceo was featured on some cuts from Prince's "Graffiti Bridge" album.

Posted by Joe-Skee on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 14:24pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis and nearly killed off Jeff Beck.

—Rolling Stone


"Blood, Sweat and Tears is embarrassing to me. They try to be so hip, they're not ... I know what they try to do: they try to get Basie's sound with knowledge."

—Miles Davis

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 07.26.08 @ 19:53pm


The history books will forever compare Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago, despite their numerous differences. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a band fronted first by organist and singer Al Kooper, then by singer David Clayton-Thomas. Chicago was fronted by three lead singers, all of whom played instruments and shared the spotlight. Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded numerous compositions by writers other than those in the band. For their first fourteen albums, Chicago wrote all their own material.

Chicago was a younger looking and sounding band, rock shaggy and folk rough despite classical training, embraced by the college crowds, as well as fans of music as diverse as Cream and Richie Havens. Blood, Sweat & Tears looked like jazz musicians; Chicago looked like a rock band. Walter Parazaider's rock 'n' roll band with horns was formed February 15, 1967 and spent almost two years rehearsing, playing, writing, and preparing for the release of its first album; Blood, Sweat & Tears was formed in mid-summer 1967 but reached the recording stage sooner because of bandleader Al Kooper's established record industry connections. Chicago was the first rock 'n' roll band with horns, but not the first to get out there on record.

Despite these differences in image and regardless of who came first, one might still be tempted to place the two bands in the same musical genre. They both had horn sections and they both played jazz-rock. Right? Wrong! Blood, Sweat & Tears was indeed a jazz band. But something happens when jazz players play rock and roll--it sounds like jazz! Chicago was a rock band with a guitar and with classical horns. Chicago was a rock band who could and did play jazz. Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock.

Posted by Roy on Thursday, 03.5.09 @ 19:26pm


Blood, Sweat and Tears was a band that formed in New York City in 1967. The band was made up of top-notch musicians who were trained in classical and jazz styles of the highest pedigree. They were a jazz-oriented combo that could play a lot of rock. Frighteningly pretentious, Blood, Sweat and Tears was fired by the same questionable impulse to fuse rock and jazz that comprised Miles Davis and nearly killed off Jeff Beck. The band consisted of eight members: Al Kooper on vocals and keyboard, Steve Katz on guitar, Jim Fielder on bass, Bobby Colomby on drums, Fred Lipsius on saxophone, Randy Brecker on trumpet, Jerry Weiss on flugelhorns, and Dick Halligan on trombone. Blood, Sweat and Tears' first album, Child Is Father To The Man from 1968 is considered to be a flawless album. Blood, Sweat and Tears was one of the greatest groups the late 1960s produced. Their sound, in contrast to rhythm and blues outfits that merely used horn sections for embelishment and accompaniment, was a true hybrid of rock and jazz, with a strong element of soul as the bonding agent that held it together. The horn section didn't just honk along on the choruses, but played complex, detailed arrangements. Steve Katz played guitar solos as well as rhythm accompaniment. Al Kooper's keyboards moved to the fore along with his singing. Blood, Sweat and Tears had elements of psychedelia in their work, but extended it into realms of jazz, rhythm and blues, and soul in ways that had scarcely been heard before in one band. The songs were attractive and challenging, the arrangements gave room for the horn section and others, to solo as well as play rippling ensemble passages.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.29.09 @ 19:43pm


Jazz-Rock Fusion was the first group of jazz styles to attain widespread popularity after the Swing era. Music experts prefer though to label jazz-rock as jazz-funk, which began in the early 1960s. Jazz can be distinguished from rock and funk because rock and funk typically have shorter phrase lengths, less frequent chord changes, less complexity of melody, less complexity of harmony, less improvisation, more repetition of melodic phrases, more repetition of brief chord progressions, more repetitive drumming patterns, and more pronounced repetition of bass figures. Jazz musicians usually place less emphasis on electronic instruments, and high amplification on accoustic instruments. Jazz, rock, and funk music share similar roots in work songs, the blues, and gospel music, but they represent the products of two divergent lines of musical evolution. Jazz employs aspects of formal European concert music and steers away from vocals; it is primarily instrumental music. Rock and funk music on the other hand, emphasize vocals and stick largely to elementary compositional forms. Jazz-rock fusion mixed jazz improvisation with the instrumentation and rhythmic conception of Rhythm and Blues. The horn parts were molded after the James Brown and Motown brass styles rather than jazz. Their singing style was patterned after soul singing. The harmonies they wrote for their horns were more advanced than Motown's and James Brown's. The high-hat in jazz-rock drumming was snapped shut sharply on every beat instead of every other beat.

The greatest popular acclaim went to Blood, Sweat and Tears, an eight-piece band featuring vocals and horn work in a James Brown and Ray Charles style. Next was Chicago, a seven-piece band featuring solo voice singing as well as four and five-part harmony. Its horn parts were often voiced for trumpet, trombone, and saxophone, in the style of late-1960s Motown. These two groups were identified by journalists as "jazz-rock" bands. Journalists gave much attention to the horns and improvisation in Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears. Journalists assumed that such elements lent jazz character to the music, that it was innovative, and that it justified the "jazz" part of the "jazz-rock" label. Rhythm and Blues bands had been using horns and improvisation since the 1950s. Some elements presumed to be significant contributions by Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears reflected existing traditions within popular music. The only element these bands had in common with jazz was the occasional presence of a brief, improvised solo. Yet this was something that R&B had long been known for. Another line of reasoning was used in applying the jazz label to "jazz-rock" groups. This was the knowledge that some members had played jazz or had jazz aspirations. This colored the thinking of journalists who overlooked the traditions with R&B and Motown and instead assumed a connection with jazz. Journalists overlooked the long history of jazz musicians touring and recording with popular non-jazz groups. Jazz musicians had not made those groups into jazz groups anymore than the presence of jazz horn men in Blood, Sweat and Tears made that group into a jazz band. Blood, Sweat and Tears was a highly professional and creative group who performed several different styles of popular music; but they did not really demonstrate a fusion of jazz with rock.

Fusion became the first jazz style since the swing era to gain popular acceptance anywhere near the level accorded swing, and it lasted at least as long as the swing era. By incorporating elements of R&B and rock into their music, several established jazz figures achieved popular success that rivaled all the peaks of recognition accorded to jazz players since the end of the swing era's wide appreciation of jazz-oriented band music. This new success for jazz musicians did not depend so much on jazz character as on jazz-rock character. As with swing era big band recordings, those pieces presenting the least improvisation tended to enjoy the most popular acclaim. As with the hits of the swing era, jazz-rock hits were identifiable by simple, repeating riffs syncopated in a catchy way. Much of what went by the jazz-rock label consisted of little more than funky rhythm vamps, elementary chord progressions, and an improvised solo riding on top. This music was so popular that, in addition to the "jazz-rock" and "jazz-fusion" labels, it also acquired the label of "crossover" music because sales of the records crossed over from the jazz market into the popular market. There are several possible explanations for the new popularity of jazz and jazz-rock in particular. Perhaps when jazz adopted the electric instruments and the accompaniment rhythms associated with rock, and rock was so familiar already, the instruments and rhythms provided a bridge of similarity for listeners that eased them into a music that had otherwise been strange and difficult to listen to. A second possibility is that the increased prominence of drums was more inviting to dancers. Third is the relative simplicity of chord progressions found in jazz-rock fusion. The new music was more involved than rock had been, but it was harmonically less complex than other jazz styles. A fourth explanation involves the extensive use of repetition for a single accompaniment pattern. Technically, it is known as ostinato, which means that a particular rhythm or brief melodic figure is repeated continuously. It was fundamental to most of the jazz-rock hits of the 1970s, and its use might explain the enormous popularity of the boogie-woogie style of jazz piano playing during the 1940s. Many of the largest-selling recordings in any category of music are distinguished by their simplicity, rhythmic vitality, and extensive use of repetition. This combination of features could also account for much of jazz-rock's commercial success.

Basically, Jazz and Rock represent seperate streams in African American music that have occasionally overlapped. Jazz differs from rock in its similar amount of repetition, larger amount of improvisation, greater complexity, and higher musicianship. Chicago and Blood, Sweat and Tears, ought not to be called jazz-rock because they used little improvisation and had more roots in soul music than in rock and roll. They represent amalgamations of existing trends, such as the band styles of James Brown and Ray Charles, rather than a fresh style. The most original fusions of funk and jazz occurred in the band of Miles Davis, and the bands launched by his sidemen. The post-1968 music of Miles Davis displayed a blend of the jazz tradition, funk music, and the music of India and South America. The most prominent jazz-rock guitarists had tone color and rhythmic conception that departed from jazz guitar tradition and drew more from urban blues and rock practices. They were known for playing with phenomenal speed and precision.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 15:25pm


Hey Roy, care to cite your source there? Plagiarism is still a crime.

Posted by Philip on Saturday, 08.1.09 @ 17:21pm


Drummer Bobby Colomby, the only drummer Blood, Sweat and Tears ever had. The one and only constant in the group (1967-1979). He was there and saw all the personel changes with the group. Amazing Jazz-Rock drummer! The best!

Posted by RAKER on Sunday, 03.7.10 @ 17:30pm


David Clayton-Thomas

1996 THE CANADIAN MUSIC HALL OF FAME
2004 THE ORDER OF CANADA
2010 THE CANADA HONOURS/CANADA'S WALK OF FAME

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 06.8.10 @ 11:09am


Blood Sweat Tears ? The best band in the world, innovative with beautiful and original songs. A legend in pop music for many and many years.

Posted by eric on Friday, 07.9.10 @ 07:21am


The Future Inductees

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Al Kooper (vocals; keyboard)
Steve Katz (guitar)
Jim Fielder (bass)
Bobby Colomby (drums)
Fred Lipsius (saxophone)
Randy Brecker (trumpet)
Jerry Weiss (flugelhorns)
Dick Halligan (trombone)
David Clayton-Thomas (vocals)

THIS IS WHY BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS HAVE NOT BEEN INDUCTED!

GROUP MEMBERS

Al Kooper : keyboards, vocals (1967–1968)
Randy Brecker : trumpet, flugelhorn (1967–1968)
Jerry Weiss : trumpet, flugelhorn, backing vocals (1967–1968)
Fred Lipsius : alto sax, keyboards (1967–1972)
Dick Halligan : keyboards, trombone, horns, flute, backing vocals (1967–1972)
Steve Katz : guitar, harmonica, lute, mandolin, vocals (1967–1973, 2008– )
Jim Fielder : bass, guitar, backing vocals (1967–1974)
Bobby Colomby : drums, percussion, backing vocals (1967–1977)
David Clayton-Thomas : vocals, guitar (1968–1972, 1974–1981, 1984–2004)
Lew Soloff : trumpet, flugelhorn (1968–1974)
Chuck Winfield : trumpet, flugelhorn, backing vocals (1968–1973)
Jerry Hyman : trombones, recorder (1968–1970)
Dave Bargeron : trombone, tuba, horns, bass, backing vocals (1970–1978)
Bobby Doyle : vocals, piano (1972)
Joe Henderson : tenor sax (1972)
Lou Marini Jr. : tenor & soprano sax, flute (1972–1974)
Larry Willis : keyboards (1972–1978)
Georg Wadenius : guitar, vocals (1972–1975)
Jerry Fisher : vocals (1972–1974)
Tom Malone : trombone, trumpet, flugelhorn, alto sax, bass (1973–1974)
Jerry LaCroix : vocals, alto sax, flute, harmonica (1974)
Ron McClure : bass (1974–1975, 1976)
Tony Klatka : trumpet, horns (1974–1978)
Bill Tillman : alto sax, flute, clarinet, backing vocals (1974–1977)
Luther Kent : vocals (1974–1976)
Joe Giorgianni : trumpet, flugelhorn (1974–1975)
Jaco Pastorius : bass (1975–1976)
Steve Khan : guitar (1975)
Mike Stern : guitar (1975–1977)
Keith Jones : bass (1976)
Danny Trifan : bass (1976–1977)
Forrest Buchtell : trumpet (1975–1977)
Don Alias : percussion (1975–1976)
Roy McCurdy : drums (1976–1977)
Jeff Richman : guitar (1976 fill in for Stern)
Randy Bernsen : guitar (1977)
Barry Finnerty : guitar (1977–1978)
Neil Stubenhaus : bass (1977–1978)
Gregory Herbert : saxophone (1977–1978)
Michael Lawrence ; trumpet (1977)
Chris Albert : trumpet (1977–1978)
Bobby Economou : drums (1977–1978, 1979–1981, 1994–1995)
Kenny Marco : guitar (1979)
David Piltch : bass (1979–1980)
Joe Sealy : keyboards (1979)
Bruce Cassidy : trumpet, flugelhorn (1979–1980)
Earl Seymour : sax, flute (1979–1981)
Steve Kennedy : sax, flute (1979)
Sally Chappis : drums (1979)
Harvey Kogan : sax, flute (1979)
Jack Scarangella : drums (1979)
Vernon Dorge : sax, flute, vuvuzela (1979–1981)
Robert Piltch : guitar (1979–1980)
Richard Martinez : keyboards (1979–1980)
Wayne Pedzwater : bass (1980–1981)
Peter Harris : guitar (1980–1981)
Lou Pomanti : keyboards (1980–1981)
Mic Gillette : trumpet (1980–1981)
James Kidwell : guitar (1984–1985)
Jeff Andrews : bass (1984–1985)
Taras Kovayl : keyboards (1984–1985)
Tim Ouimette : trumpet, horns (1984–1985)
Mario Cruz : sax, flute (1984–1985)
Ricky Sebastian : drums (1984–1985)
Steve Guttman : trumpet (1985–2004)
Dave Gellis : guitar (1985–1990, 1996, 1998 fill in, 2005– )
Ray Peterson : bass (1985–1986)
Scott Kreitzer : sax, flute (1985–1986)
Teddy Mulet : trombone (1985–1986), trumpet (2005– )
Barry Danielian : trumpet (1985–1986)
Richard Sussman : keyboards (1985–1987)
Randy Andos : trombone (1986)
Tom Timko : sax, flute (1986–1987, 1995, 1998–2001, 2005–2008)
Tom DeFaria : drums (1985–1986)
John Conte : bass (1986–1987)
Steve Conte : guitar (1986 fill in)
Jeff Gellis : bass (1987–1990)
Dave Panichi : trombone (1987–1988, 1997–1998)
Glenn McClelland : keyboards (1987–1993, 1998, 2005– )
David Riekenberg : sax, flute (1987–1990, 1995–1998)
Jerry Sokolov : trumpet (1987–1994)
Graham Hawthorne : drums (1987–1988, 1989–1991)
Van Romaine : drums (1988–1989)
Neil Capolongo : drums (1991–1993)
Peter Abbott : drums (fill in early 1990s)
Charley Gordon : trombone (1987–1994, 2001)
Wayne Schuster : sax, flute (1990–1991)
Larry DeBari : guitar, vocals (1990–1997)
Gary Foote : bass (1990–1994, 1996–2004, 2005– )
Chuck Fisher : sax, flute (1991)
Jack Bashcow : sax, flute (1992)
Tim Ries : sax, flute (1992–1993, 1993–1995)
Charlie Cole : sax, flute (1993)
Matt King keyboards (1994–1998)
Mike Mancini (musician)|Mike Mancini : keyboards (fill in '80s/'90s)
Franck Amsallem keyboards (fill in mid '90s)
Henry Hey : keyboards (fill in mid '90s)
Ted Kooshian keyboards (fill in mid '90s)
Cliff Korman keyboards (fill in mid '90s)
Mike DuClos bass : (1994–1996)
Jonathan Peretz : drums (1995–1997)
Craig Johnson : trumpet (1994–1998)
Matt Milmerstadt drums : (1995, 1998)
Tom Guarna : guitar (1997–1998)
Jon Owens : trumpet (1998–2000)
Chuck Pillow : sax, flute (fill in 1998)
Brian Delaney : drums (1998, 2001)
Dave Stahl : trumpet (fill in 1995–1998)
Winston Byrd : trumpet (fill in 1998)
Dave Pietro : sax, flute (fill in 1998)
Dale Kirkland : trombone (1995–1996, 1998, 1999–2001, 2002–2006)
Pat Hallaran : trombone (1998–1999)
James Fox : guitar (1998–2000)
Dan Zank : keyboards (1998–2000)
Zach Danziger : drums (1998–2001)
Joe Mosello : trumpet (2000–2002)
Phil Magallanes : keyboards (2000–2001)
Andrea Valentini : drums (2001– )
Darcy Hepner : sax, flute (1999 fill in, 2001–2004)
John Samorian : keyboards (2001–2003)
Nick Marchione : trumpet (2002–2004)
Eric Cortright : keyboards (2003–2004)
Leo Huppert: bass (2004)
Steve Jankowski: trumpet (2005– )
Rob Paparozzi: vocals, harmonica (2005– )
Scottie Wallace: vocals (alternating with Rob P. 2005–2006)
Thomas Conner : vocals (fill in 2006 & 2007)
Jens Wendelboe: trombone (2006– )
Chris Tedesco : trumpet (fill in for Mulet 2006–2007)
Brian Steel : trumpet (fill in for Mulet 2008)
Bill Churchville : sax (fill in for Timko 2008)
Ken Gioffre : sax (fill in for Timko 2010)

(Roster provided by Jim Mullen) Wikipedia

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 10:47am


well Roy, I see you are still making loooongass posts! but with respect, all those names is not why BS&T waz left out to dry. there are other reasons. (maybe I will tell later?) but for the record, I would vote Yes.

Posted by Telarock on Wednesday, 07.14.10 @ 10:53am


Happy 69th Birthday, David Clayton-Thomas. Ride a painted pony, iet the spinning wheel spin.

Posted by Aaron O'Donnell on Monday, 09.13.10 @ 14:08pm


Actually....

Blood, Sweat & Tears inductees:

Al Kooper : keyboards, vocals (1967–1968)
Randy Brecker : trumpet, flugelhorn (1967–1968)
Jerry Weiss : trumpet, flugelhorn, backing vocals (1967–1968)
Fred Lipsius : alto sax, keyboards (1967–1972)
Dick Halligan : keyboards, trombone, horns, flute, backing vocals (1967–1972)
Steve Katz : guitar, harmonica, lute, mandolin, vocals (1967–1973, 2008– )
Jim Fielder : bass, guitar, backing vocals (1967–1974)
Bobby Colomby : drums, percussion, backing vocals (1967–1977)
David Clayton-Thomas : vocals, guitar (1968–1972, 1974–1981, 1984–2004)
Lew Soloff : trumpet, flugelhorn (1968–1974)
Chuck Winfield : trumpet, flugelhorn, backing vocals (1968–1973)
Jerry Hyman : trombones, recorder (1968–1970)
Dave Bargeron : trombone, tuba, horns, bass, backing vocals (1970–1978)

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 11.2.10 @ 17:25pm


THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. 1968 - # 47 Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1969 - # 01 Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970 - # 01 Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1971 - # 10 Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
05. 1972 - # 19 Blood, Sweat & Tears' Greatest Hits
06. 1972 - # 32 New Blood
07. 1973 - # 72 No Sweat
08. 1974 - # 149 Mirror Image
09. 1975 - # 47 New City
10. 1976 - # 165 More Than Ever

THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1969 - # 02 And When I Die
02. 1969 - # 02 Spinning Wheel
03. 1969 - # 02 You've Made Me So Very Happy
04. 1970 - # 14 Hi-De-Ho (That Old Sweet Roll)
05. 1970 - # 29 Lucretia MacEvil
06. 1971 - # 32 Go Down Gamblin'
07. 1971 - # 73 Lisa, Listen to Me
08. 1972 - # 44 So Long Dixie
09. 1974 - # 83 Tell Me That I'm Wrong
10. 1975 - # 62 Life

Posted by Roy on Friday, 11.5.10 @ 02:44am


http://www.digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/best_halloffame_x1.html

FROM THE DIGITAL DREAM DOOR

Blood, Sweat & Tears

Jazz-rock is not highly regarded, nor was it too widely successful, so the group that kicked off that trend probably won't get much support from voters, especially since BS&T founder Al Kooper, who does get respect, left acrimoniously so soon after they began. If the Hall is looking to bestow honor on Al they have an outside shot, otherwise it's a pipe-dream, even with their brief run of big hits early on.

Qualifications: 5 - Worth Examining, But Will Often Fall Short

Same rating as Chicago.

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 11.6.10 @ 05:49am


The Rock Hall may feel the need to induct Blood, Sweat & Tears before inducting Chicago. They may have them on the same ballot the way they have done with Donna Summer and Chic twice already. They might even induct Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears in the same year, the same way they inducted The Eagles and Fleetwood Mac in the same year (1998).

Posted by Roy on Monday, 11.8.10 @ 00:42am



No American rock group ever started with as much daring or musical promise as Blood, Sweat & Tears, or realized their potential more fully -- and then blew it all as quickly. From their origins as a jazz-rock experiment that wowed critics and listeners, they went on -- in a somewhat more pop vein -- to sell almost six million records in three years, but ended up being dropped by their record label four years after that. Blood, Sweat & Tears started as an idea conceived by Al Kooper in July of 1967. An ex-member of the Blues Project, Kooper had been toying with the notion, growing out of his admiration for jazz bandleader Maynard Ferguson, of forming an electric rock band that would include horns and use jazz as the basis for their work. He planned to pursue this in London, but a series of New York shows involving some big-name friends didn't raise enough money to get him there. He did, however, find three players who wanted to work with him: bassist Jim Fielder, Blues Project guitarist Steve Katz, and drummer Bobby Colomby. Kooper agreed, as long as he was in charge musically. The horn section featured Fred Lipsius (saxophone), with Randy Brecker and Jerry Weiss on trumpets and flügelhorns, and Dick Halligan playing trombone. The new group was signed to Columbia Records, and the name "Blood, Sweat & Tears" came to Kooper after a jam at the Cafe au Go Go, where a cut on his hand left his organ keyboard covered in blood.

That first version of Blood, Sweat & Tears played music that roamed freely through realms of jazz, R&B, soul, and even psychedelia in ways that had scarcely been heard before in one band. The songs were bold and challenging, and the arrangements gave Lipsius, Brecker, et. al room to solo, while Kooper's organ and Katz's guitar swelled in pulsing, shimmering glory. Their debut, Child Is Father to the Man, was released in February 1968, and seemed to portend a great future. The only thing it didn't have was a hit single to get AM radio play and help drive sales.

Disagreements about repertory grew into doubts about Kooper's ability as a lead singer, and soon split this band. Kooper left in March of 1968, and Brecker followed him out. That might've been the end of the story, except that Colomby and Katz decided to salvage a band of their own band out of this debacle. The lineup was reshuffled and expanded, and for a lead singer they found a Canadian national named David Clayton-Thomas.

The new Blood, Sweat & Tears recorded their album in late 1968. Blood, Sweat & Tears, released in January 1969, was smoother and more traditionally melodic than its predecessor. Equally important, the singles from the album were edited, removing the featured spots for the jazz players. "You've Made Me So Very Happy" rose to number two and lofted the album to the top of the LP listings. "Spinning Wheel" b/w "More and More" and "And When I Die" followed, and when the smoke cleared, the album had yielded a career's worth of hits. The LP also won the Grammy as Album of the Year, selling three million copies in the bargain.

In the spring of 1970, however, the group lost a huge amount of momentum with its core audience, college students, when they undertook a tour of Eastern Europe on behalf of the U.S. State Department. The Vietnam War was still raging, and anything to do with the government was potentially poisonous on college campuses. It was on their return to America, amid this dubious career move -- which was done to overcome the problem of Clayton-Thomas' shaky immigration status -- that Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 was released. It briefly topped the LP charts, and the single "Hi-De-Ho" reached number 14, but both sold only a fraction of what their earlier releases had done. Additionally, the group was now criticized in the rock press, which felt that Blood, Sweat & Tears were either a pretentious pop group that dabbled in horn riffs, or a jazz outfit trying to pass as a rock band. The group's decision to perform at a Las Vegas casino -- which even upset the head of Columbia Records, Clive Davis -- did nothing to defuse these doubts.

Clayton-Thomas exited after the fourth album to pursue a solo career. Most of the group's original and second-generation players were gone by then as well, though the playing standard remained consistently high. The lineup became a revolving door -- even Jaco Pastorius passed through their ranks, briefly -- and the group's record sales imploded, squeezed as they were by Chicago on the pop side of jazz-rock, and outfits such as Weather Report and Return to Forever on the more musically ambitious side of the spectrum. Clayton-Thomas returned in 1974, to what was billed officially as "Blood, Sweat & Tears Featuring David Clayton-Thomas." They released New City (1975), which did well enough to justify an ambitious tour that yielded the double-LP Live and Improvised. Columbia Records dropped the group in 1976, and even Bobby Colomby, who had trademarked the group's name, gave up playing with them. Clayton-Thomas has kept the group name alive in the decades since, fronting various lineups.

-AMG

Posted by Roy on Monday, 12.13.10 @ 08:47am


http://tomlanesblog.blogspot.com/2011/02/chicago-and-ro-ck-hall.html

This also explains why Blood, Sweat & Tears are not in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, since James William Guercio was also their producer.


Chicago and The Rock Hall

A clue, perhaps, as to why Chicago is not in the Rock Hall. In the February 2011 issue of Britain's Record Collector, original drummer Danny Seraphine has this reply as to why Chicago is not in: "I think there was an ongoing feud with Rolling Stone magazine. It seemed everyone was getting on the cover and we were huge and they never put us on the cover. Jimmy Guercio, our producer got into a feud with Jann Wenner, which I think kept us out of the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. I don't think we've ever been on the ballot (note: they haven't). Chicago sold 130 million records, and maybe it's not all about sales, but our early records are beautifully crafted and great music. For me, it's a slap in the face to the fans and to the band too."

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 02.13.11 @ 19:45pm


Peter, Paul and Mary
Emerson, Lake and Palmer
Blood, Sweat and Tears
Earth, Wind and Fire

Posted by Roy on Friday, 06.3.11 @ 08:14am


Peter, Paul and Mary
Emerson, Lake and Palmer
Blood, Sweat and Tears
Earth, Wind and Fire
Crosby, Stills and Nash

Posted by Roy on Friday, 06.3.11 @ 08:23am


There are people that got in that should not be in either like Madonna. But Chicago and Blood Sweet and Tears, Jethro Tull, Bob Seager to name a few are not in is a joke. I understand some don't like it who votes but they should not blinded by their prejudices but do what is right for music how can Madonna and others make it and these groups not. That is a joke.

Posted by Ron Davis on Wednesday, 03.7.12 @ 13:09pm


becuase she's

1: massively succesful, always a help when you're trying to get in the hall.
2: probably the most well known female artist ever (don't even bring up mariah or whitney)
3: one of the most iconic popstars ever.
4: her musics not bad an' all.

Posted by GFW on Wednesday, 03.7.12 @ 15:48pm


Bob Seger is already in!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 03.7.12 @ 20:25pm


Earth Wind and Fire is #143 on this ranking, behind the Bee Gees, ABBA, Blondie, and others? Who makes up this list?

Posted by Tod A Kowallis on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 16:04pm


We did :D

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 16:29pm


Aww, come on why hate on ABBA?

Posted by Tahvo Parvianen on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 16:32pm


or blondie for that matter!

Posted by GFW on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 17:22pm


They are never getting in. Nor should they.

Posted by astrodog on Saturday, 04.14.12 @ 23:21pm


Okay, I understand that your rankings are personal opinion, but what is the criteria? From just the standpoint of musicianship and creativity, to say nothing of a history of success and longevity there is no way that EWF can be ranked outside of the top 100.

Posted by Tod A Kowallis on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 13:11pm


because the other bands in the top 100 are objectively better than them.

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 13:28pm


You mean, subjectively. By the way, VHF ranks them in their Top 100, partly based upon artists also ranked in the top 100. That's enough for me. Take care.

Posted by Tod A Kowallis on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 13:41pm


nah, objectively. doing it subjectively would be silly because no one on this site agrees on everything.

Posted by GFW on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 13:50pm


Okay, objectively speaking you offer no criteria. Also, in order to make an "objective" ranking you should probably know each group's entire discography.

Posted by Tod A Kowallis on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 18:12pm


I'll take the idea seriously. BSTs had a nice commercal run from 1968 to 1971. Their most successful album was their second, self-titled album, which went multi-platinum, the only album to reach platinum status. Of their main hits, three-You've Made Me So Very Happy (#2), And When I Die (#2) and Hi-De-Ho (#14) were written by outside songwriters. The one original song that casual music fans will be familiar with is Spinning Wheel (#2).
In fact, a closer look at their breakthrough second album shows that out of 10 tracks, only 2 were original songs. However, this is just a factor.
Regardless, you are talking about a relatively brief commercial run, one platinum status album, and a lack of original hits. Doubtlessly a successful band, but you are not talking about the type of overwhelming commercial success that overrides all other factors.
As to other factors, nor can you really call them innovative. They were doing a type of jazz-rock fusion that was common in that era. Compare them to Chicago, who also specialized in jazz/rock fusion music in that era, and it's simply no comparison.
So all in all I would say a case can be made for BSTs, just not a strong one. They were muically talented (the number of musicians associated with BSTs is dizzying), but there are a lot of talented artists that I do not believe make the cut. Still, it's a stronger case than could be made for Laura Nyro, so there is a chance. But there are bands like Chicago that are clearly in front of them on line.

Posted by astrodog on Sunday, 04.15.12 @ 23:50pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968; lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977; drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973; guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973; bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971; trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971; saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968; trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968; trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)

14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973; woodwinds)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
20. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
21. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
22. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
23. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)
24. Tom Malone (1973; trumpet)
25. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
26. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years and 11 Studio Albums

Blood, Sweat & Tears Albums

01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
05. 1972: New Blood
06. 1973: No Sweat
07. 1974: Mirror Image
08. 1975: New City
09. 1976: More Than Ever
10. 1977: Brand New Day
11. 1980: Nuclear Blues

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 05.1.13 @ 13:53pm


Al Kooper will be inducted with Blood, Sweat & Tears even though he left after the first album. Al Kooper founded Blood, Sweat & Tears and he is very well known and respected in the music industry as a musician and producer and former member of the Blues Project as well. Al Kooper wrote most of and sang all of the songs on the first Blood, Sweat & Tears album, Child Is Father To The Man, which is a classic album.

This is not a case like Gram Parsons of The Byrds or John Rutsy of Rush who left after the first albums. Child Is Father To The Man was a very important album. Al Kooper will be inducted with Blood, Sweat & Tears.

The new Rock Hall Museum President, Greg Harris recently name dropped Blood, Sweat & Tears as one of the bands he would like to see inducted. I'm sure he'll get Al Kooper to be included in the induction.

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 05.1.13 @ 14:11pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968; lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977; drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973; guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973; bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971; trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971; saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968; trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968; trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)

14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973; woodwinds)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
20. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
21. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
22. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
23. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)

24. Tom Malone (1973; trumpet)
25. David Hentschel (1973; synthesizer)
26. Jimmy Maelen (1973; percussion)
27. Frank Ricotti (1973; percussion)
28. Robert Mason (1974; synthesizer)
29. Ralph MacDonald (1974; percussion)
30. Dom Um Romão (1974; percussion)
31. Warren Smith (1974; percussion)
32. Jerry Lacroix (1974; saxophone, vocals)
33. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
34. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

35. Robert Piltch (1980-1981; guitar)
36. Dave Piltch (1980-1981; bass)
37. Bobby Economou (1980-1981; drums)
38. Richard Martinez (1980-1981; organ, piano, clavinet)
39. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981; trumpet, fluegelhorn)
40. Earl Seymour (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)
41. Vern Dorge (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years and 11 Studio Albums

01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
05. 1972: New Blood
06. 1973: No Sweat
07. 1974: Mirror Image
08. 1975: New City
09. 1976: More Than Ever
10. 1977: Brand New Day
11. 1980: Nuclear Blues

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.10.13 @ 10:26am


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)

14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973: woodwinds; The Blues Brothers)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
20. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
21. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
22. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
23. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)

24. Tom Malone (1973: trumpet; The Blues Brothers)
25. David Hentschel (1973; synthesizer)
26. Jimmy Maelen (1973; percussion)
27. Frank Ricotti (1973; percussion)
28. Robert Mason (1974; synthesizer)
29. Ralph MacDonald (1974; percussion)
30. Dom Um Romão (1974; percussion)
31. Warren Smith (1974; percussion)
32. Jerry Lacroix (1974; saxophone, vocals)
33. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
34. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

35. Robert Piltch (1980-1981; guitar)
36. Dave Piltch (1980-1981; bass)
37. Bobby Economou (1980-1981; drums)
38. Richard Martinez (1980-1981; organ, piano, clavinet)
39. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981; trumpet, fluegelhorn)
40. Earl Seymour (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)
41. Vern Dorge (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)

Posted by Roy on Friday, 05.24.13 @ 17:32pm


I think the Rock Hall will make an exception and induct Al Kooper with Blood, Sweat and Tears because Child Is Father To The Man was a very important album. Plus, he has lots of friends in the industry. This isn't like John Rutsy or Chad Channing.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.15.14 @ 10:03am


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)

14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973: woodwinds; The Blues Brothers)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
20. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
21. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
22. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
23. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)

24. Tom Malone (1973: trumpet; The Blues Brothers)
25. David Hentschel (1973; synthesizer)
26. Jimmy Maelen (1973; percussion)
27. Frank Ricotti (1973; percussion)
28. Robert Mason (1974; synthesizer)
29. Ralph MacDonald (1974; percussion)
30. Dom Um Romão (1974; percussion)
31. Warren Smith (1974; percussion)
32. Jerry Lacroix (1974; saxophone, vocals)
33. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
34. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

35. Robert Piltch (1980-1981; guitar)
36. Dave Piltch (1980-1981; bass)
37. Bobby Economou (1980-1981; drums)
38. Richard Martinez (1980-1981; organ, piano, clavinet)
39. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981; trumpet, fluegelhorn)
40. Earl Seymour (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)
41. Vern Dorge (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years and 11 Studio Albums


01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
05. 1972: New Blood
06. 1973: No Sweat
07. 1974: Mirror Image
08. 1975: New City
09. 1976: More Than Ever
10. 1977: Brand New Day
11. 1980: Nuclear Blues

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.15.14 @ 10:10am


Al Kooper founded the group, so he will be included in the induction.

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 04.22.14 @ 08:40am


ALBUMS ON iTunes

01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
05. 1972: New Blood
06. 1973: No Sweat
07. 1974: Mirror Image
08. 1975: New City
11. 1980: Nuclear Blues

ALBUMS NOT ON iTunes YET!

04. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
09. 1976: More Than Ever
10. 1977: Brand New Day

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 09:53am


Of the 41 members of Blood, Sweat & Tears who performed on the albums, 8 of the members were original members. 3 of the original members left the band after the first album (the most important album), so they should be included in the induction. 23 non-original members of BST were with the band for only one album or one year and two albums. 41 minus 23 leaves 18 members of BST who can be considered for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and they are as follows:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
18. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 10:32am


Black saxophonist Joe Henderson is on the cover of two Blood, Sweat & Tears albums: No Sweat and Mirror Image, but he is not mentioned anywhere on any of the credits on wikipedia. Plus, the wikipedia page for Joe Henderson makes no mention of him ever being a member of Blood, Sweat & Tears. This is really weird!

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 11:42am


Jerry Lacroix R.I.P

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 11:43am


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)

13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973: woodwinds; The Blues Brothers)
18. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
19. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
20. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
21. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
22. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
23. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
24. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)

25. Tom Malone (1973: trumpet; The Blues Brothers)
26. David Hentschel (1973; synthesizer)
27. Jimmy Maelen (1973; percussion)
28. Frank Ricotti (1973; percussion)
29. Robert Mason (1974; synthesizer)
30. Ralph MacDonald (1974; percussion)
31. Dom Um Romão (1974; percussion)
32. Warren Smith (1974; percussion)
33. Jerry Lacroix (1974; saxophone, vocals)
34. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
35. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

36. Robert Piltch (1980-1981; guitar)
37. Dave Piltch (1980-1981; bass)
38. Bobby Economou (1980-1981; drums)
39. Richard Martinez (1980-1981; organ, piano, clavinet)
40. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981; trumpet, fluegelhorn)
41. Earl Seymour (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)
42. Vern Dorge (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years and 11 Studio Albums


01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4
05. 1972: New Blood
06. 1973: No Sweat
07. 1974: Mirror Image
08. 1975: New City
09. 1976: More Than Ever
10. 1977: Brand New Day
11. 1980: Nuclear Blues

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 16:31pm


Of the 42 members of Blood, Sweat & Tears who performed on the albums, 8 of the members were original members. 3 of the original members left the band after the first album (the most important album), so they should be included in the induction. 24 non-original members of BST were with the band for only one album or one year and two albums. 42 minus 24 leaves 18 members of BST who can be considered for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and they are as follows:

Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
14. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
15. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
16. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
17. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
18. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)

Posted by Roy on Wednesday, 07.16.14 @ 16:38pm


Favorite Songs: So Long Dixie and Save Our Ship

Posted by Roy on Tuesday, 07.22.14 @ 12:06pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)

13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973: woodwinds; The Blues Brothers)
18. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
19. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
20. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)
21. Ron McClure (1974-1975; bass)
22. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977; trumpet, flugelhorn)
23. Mike Stern (1976-1977; guitar)
24. Danny Trifan (1976-1977; bass)

25. Tom Malone (1973: trumpet; The Blues Brothers)
26. David Hentschel (1973; synthesizer)
27. Jimmy Maelen (1973; percussion)
28. Frank Ricotti (1973; percussion)
29. Robert Mason (1974; synthesizer)
30. Ralph MacDonald (1974; percussion)
31. Dom Um Romão (1974; percussion)
32. Warren Smith (1974; percussion)
33. Jerry Lacroix (1974; saxophone, vocals)
34. Joe Giorgianni (1975; trumpet, flugelhorn)
35. Roy McCurdy (1977; drums)

36. Robert Piltch (1980-1981; guitar)
37. Dave Piltch (1980-1981; bass)
38. Bobby Economou (1980-1981; drums)
39. Richard Martinez (1980-1981; organ, piano, clavinet)
40. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981; trumpet, fluegelhorn)
41. Earl Seymour (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)
42. Vern Dorge (1980-1981; saxophone, flute)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years and 12 Studio Albums


01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man (Produced by John Simon)
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears (Produced by James William Guercio)
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 (Produced by Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee)
04. 1970: The Owl And The Pussy Cat (Produced by Thomas Z. Shepard)
05. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4 (Produced by Bobby Colomby, Roy Halee, and Don Heckman)
06. 1972: New Blood (Produced by Bobby Colomby)
07. 1973: No Sweat (Produced by Steve Tyrell)
08. 1974: Mirror Image (Produced by Henry Cosby)
09. 1975: New City (Produced by Jimmy Ienner)
10. 1976: More Than Ever (Produced by Bob James)
11. 1977: Brand New Day (Produced by Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee)
12. 1980: Nuclear Blues (Produced by Jerry Goldstein)

THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. 1968: # 47 - Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: # 1 - Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: # 1 - Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1970: # 186 - The Owl And The Pussy Cat
05. 1971: # 10 - B, S & T 4
06. 1972: # 19 - Greatest Hits
07. 1972: # 32 - New Blood
08. 1973: # 72 - No Sweat
09. 1974: # 149 - Mirror Image
10. 1975: # 47 - New City
11. 1976: # 165 - More Than Ever
12. 1977: # 205 - Brand New Day
13. 1980: # NA - Nuclear Blues

THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1969: # 2 - You've Made Me So Very Happy
02. 1969: # 2 - Spinning Wheel
03. 1969: # 2 - And When I Die
04. 1970: # 14 - Hi-De-Ho
05. 1970: # 29 - Lucretia Mac Evil
06. 1971: # 32 - Go Down Gamblin'
07. 1971: # 73 - Lisa, Listen To Me
08. 1972: # 44 - So Long Dixie
09. 1974: # 83 - Tell Me That I'm Wrong
10. 1975: # 62 - Got To Get You Into My Life

THE BILLBOARD BUBBLING UNDER 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1972: # 103 - I Can't Move No Mountains
02. 1976: # 106 - You're The One

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 01.9.16 @ 09:38am


Blood, Sweat & Tears

LINE-UP # 1:

Child Is Father To The Man: The First And The Best Album


01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

LINE-UP # 2

Blood, Sweat & Tears 2, 3 & 4
Blood, Sweat & Tears 2 & 3 Are # 1 Albums
Blood, Sweat & Tears 2 Wins The Grammy For Album Of The Year


01. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
02. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
03. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
04. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
05. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
06. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
07. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)

LINE-UP # 3

BST 4, New Blood, No Sweat, Mirror Image, New City, More Than Ever, Brand New Day


01. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
02. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
03. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
04. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
05. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
06. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
07. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
08. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
09. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
10. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
11. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
12. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
13. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)

THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Blood, Sweat & Tears


01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981; lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973; trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970; trombone)

MIGHT BE INDUCTED

13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977; trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977; keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975; guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974; lead vocals)
17. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977; trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977; saxophone)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.10.16 @ 09:23am


Al Kooper, Randy Brecker, and Jerry Weiss left Blood, Sweat & Tears after the first album, but they will still be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame because that first BST album was very important.

Blood, Sweat & Tears had three lead singers: Al Kooper, David Clayton-Thomas, and Jerry Fisher. Al Kooper and David Clayton-Thomas will definitely be inducted, but will Jerry Fisher be inducted for the New Blood, No Sweat, and Mirror Image albums.

So Long Dixie and Save Our Ship should get Jerry Fisher inducted!

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.10.16 @ 10:45am


Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard; The Blues Project)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar; The Blues Project, American Flyer)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981: lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970: trombone)

13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977: trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977: keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975: guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974: lead vocals)
17. Lou Marini (1972-1973: woodwinds; The Blues Brothers)
18. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
19. Tony Klatka (1974-1977: trumpet)
20. Bill Tillman (1974-1977: saxophone)
21. Ron McClure (1974-1975: bass)
22. Forest Buchtell (1976-1977: trumpet, flugelhorn)
23. Mike Stern (1976-1977: guitar)
24. Danny Trifan (1976-1977: bass)

25. Bobby Doyle (1972: piano)
26. Tom Malone (1973: trumpet; The Blues Brothers)
27. David Hentschel (1973: synthesizer)
28. Jimmy Maelen (1973: percussion)
29. Frank Ricotti (1973: percussion)
30. Robert Mason (1974: synthesizer)
31. Ralph MacDonald (1974: percussion)
32. Dom Um Romão (1974: percussion)
33. Warren Smith (1974: percussion)
34. Jerry Lacroix (1974: saxophone, vocals)
35. Joe Giorgianni (1975: trumpet, flugelhorn)
36. Mike Corbett (1975: background vocals)
37. Don Alias (1976: percussion)
38. Roy McCurdy (1977: drums)

39. Robert Piltch (1980-1981: guitar)
40. Dave Piltch (1980-1981: bass)
41. Bobby Economou (1980-1981: drums)
42. Richard Martinez (1980-1981: organ, piano, clavinet)
43. Bruce Cassidy (1980-1981: trumpet, fluegelhorn)
44. Earl Seymour (1980-1981: saxophone, flute)
45. Vern Dorge (1980-1981: saxophone, flute)

Blood, Sweat & Tears (1967-1981)
14 Years; 12 Studio Albums; 45 Band Members


01. 1968: Child Is Father To The Man (Produced by John Simon)
02. 1968: Blood, Sweat & Tears (Produced by James William Guercio)
03. 1970: Blood, Sweat & Tears 3 (Produced by Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee)
04. 1970: The Owl And The Pussycat (Produced by Thomas Z. Shepard)
05. 1971: Blood, Sweat & Tears 4 (Produced by Bobby Colomby, Roy Halee, and Don Heckman)
06. 1972: New Blood (Produced by Bobby Colomby)
07. 1973: No Sweat (Produced by Steve Tyrell)
08. 1974: Mirror Image (Produced by Henry Cosby)
09. 1975: New City (Produced by Jimmy Ienner)
10. 1976: More Than Ever (Produced by Bob James)
11. 1977: Brand New Day (Produced by Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee)
12. 1980: Nuclear Blues (Produced by Jerry Goldstein)

THE BILLBOARD 200 ALBUMS CHART

01. 1968: # 47 - Child Is Father To The Man
02. 1968: # 1 - Blood, Sweat & Tears
03. 1970: # 1 - Blood, Sweat & Tears 3
04. 1970: # 186 - The Owl And The Pussycat
05. 1971: # 10 - B, S & T 4
06. 1972: # 19 - Greatest Hits
07. 1972: # 32 - New Blood
08. 1973: # 72 - No Sweat
09. 1974: # 149 - Mirror Image
10. 1975: # 47 - New City
11. 1976: # 165 - More Than Ever
12. 1977: # 205 - Brand New Day
13. 1980: # NA - Nuclear Blues

THE BILLBOARD 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1969: # 2 - You've Made Me So Very Happy
02. 1969: # 2 - Spinning Wheel
03. 1969: # 2 - And When I Die
04. 1970: # 14 - Hi-De-Ho
05. 1970: # 29 - Lucretia Mac Evil
06. 1971: # 32 - Go Down Gamblin'
07. 1971: # 73 - Lisa, Listen To Me
08. 1972: # 44 - So Long Dixie
09. 1974: # 83 - Tell Me That I'm Wrong
10. 1975: # 62 - Got To Get You Into My Life

THE BILLBOARD BUBBLING UNDER 100 SINGLES CHART

01. 1972: # 103 - I Can't Move No Mountains
02. 1976: # 106 - You're The One

Blood, Sweat & Tears

LINE-UP # 1:

Child Is Father To The Man: The First And The Best Album

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)

LINE-UP # 2:

Blood, Sweat & Tears 2, 3 & 4
Blood, Sweat & Tears 2 & 3 Are # 1 Albums
Blood, Sweat & Tears 2 Wins The Grammy For Album Of The Year


01. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
02. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
03. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
04. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
05. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
06. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981: lead vocals)
07. Lew Soloff (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970: trombone)

LINE-UP # 3:

BST 4, New Blood, No Sweat, Mirror Image, New City, More Than Ever, Brand New Day


01. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
02. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
03. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
04. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981: lead vocals)
05. Lew Soloff (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
06. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
07. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977: trombone)
08. Larry Willis (1972-1977: keyboards)
09. George Wadenius (1972-1975: guitar)
10. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974: lead vocals)
11. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
12. Tony Klatka (1974-1977: trumpet)
13. Bill Tillman (1974-1977: saxophone)

THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Blood, Sweat & Tears : LINE-UP 1 & 2


01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981: lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970: trombone)

MIGHT BE INDUCTED : FROM LINE-UP 3

13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977: trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977: keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975: guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974: lead vocals)
17. Joe Henderson (1973-1974: saxophone)
18. Tony Klatka (1974-1977: trumpet)
19. Bill Tillman (1974-1977: saxophone)

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 01.10.16 @ 11:08am


Not only does BS & T meet the "musical excellence" criteria (whatever that means & highly subjective)--they were also innovators for the time. I do not know if they were first for jazz rock fusion, but they were very early to have huge success with that genre.
I recall when "You've Made Me So Very Happy" hit the charts! Album was played in our college dorm constantly!

Posted by SUSAN J SABO on Sunday, 02.14.16 @ 15:34pm


THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Blood, Sweat & Tears

01. Al Kooper (1967-1968: lead vocals, piano, organ, ondioline, keyboard)
02. Bobby Colomby (1967-1977: drums, percussions)
03. Steve Katz (1967-1973: guitar)
04. Jim Fielder (1967-1973: bass)
05. Dick Halligan (1967-1971: trombone)
06. Fred Lipsius (1967-1971: saxophone)
07. Randy Brecker (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
08. Jerry Weiss (1967-1968: trumpet, flugelhorn)
09. David Clayton-Thomas (1968-1971; 1975-1981: lead vocals)
10. Lew Soloff (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
11. Chuck Winfield (1968-1973: trumpet, flugelhorn)
12. Jerry Hyman (1968-1970: trombone)
13. Dave Bargeron (1971-1977: trombone)
14. Larry Willis (1972-1977: keyboards)
15. George Wadenius (1972-1975: guitar)
16. Jerry Fisher (1972-1974: lead vocals)
17. Tony Klatka (1974-1977: trumpet)
18. Bill Tillman (1974-1977: saxophone)

Posted by Roy on Monday, 10.24.16 @ 20:03pm


If indeed the Rock Hall will only induct 8 members of a band from now on, it doesn't look good for Blood, Sweat & Tears. They had 8 original members. 3 members left after the first album, the most important album. The most important replacement member David Clayton-Thomas makes it 9.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.4.17 @ 17:55pm


If indeed the Rock Hall will only induct 8 members of a band from now on, it doesn't look good for Blood, Sweat & Tears. They had 8 original members. 3 members left after the first album, the most important album. The most important replacement member David Clayton-Thomas makes it 9.

Posted by Roy on Sunday, 06.4.17 @ 17:55pm


ROY
I'm curious where you think Blood, Sweat & Tears compares to Chicago in musicianship and their influence. It seems Blood, Sweat & Tears would be a band the RRHOF would nominate and induct. Spinning Wheel is a King FAV. Enjoy your posts. They're very informative. KING

Posted by KING on Monday, 06.5.17 @ 18:09pm


To me, Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago never sounded the same. There is no comparison. It's apples and oranges. Robert Lamm once said that Blood, Sweat & Tears was a jazz band who could and did play rock, while Chicago was a rock band who could and did play jazz. After listening to all of Blood, Sweat & Tears' albums I understood what he meant.

I'll admit, I think Blood, Sweat & Tears was a better band. The production was better on all their albums. The horn parts were longer and louder. It always felt like BST were more knowledgeable than Chicago, more educated.

I can't talk about who I think is more influential because the music isn't the same to me. Chicago obviously lasted longer and sold more though. BST never really changed their sound. Chicago did.

I do prefer David Clayton-Thomas and Jerry Fisher over Terry Kath as singers though.

You can't compare Steve Katz's guitar playing to Terry Kath's guitar playing. They didn't play the same way.

Al Kooper and Larry Willis on piano vs. Robert Lamm.

Bobby Colomby was a better drummer than Danny Seraphine.

Katz and Kath…that's weird.

Posted by Roy on Monday, 06.5.17 @ 23:47pm


Blood, Sweat & Tears Songs Written By The Members Of Blood, Sweat & Tears

Al Kooper

01. I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know
02. My Days Are Numbered
03. I Can’t Quit Her
04. Somethin’ Goin’ On
05. House In The Country
06. The Modern Adventures Of Plato, Diogenes And Freud
07. Refugee From Yuhupitz
08. John The Baptist (Holy John)

Steve Katz

01. Meagan’s Gypsy Eyes
02. Sometimes In Winter
03. Blues - Part II
04. The Battle
05. Lucretia’s Reprise
06. High On A Mountain
07. Valentine’s Day
08. For My Lady
09. Mama Gets High
10. “M”

Dick Halligan

01. The Battle
02. Lucretia’s Reprise
03. Symphony For The Devil
04. The Confrontation
05. The Warmup
06. The Seduction
07. The Morning After
08. The Reunion
09. Just Want To Mention (You’ve Been Alone Too Long)
10. The Owl And The Pussycat
11. Cowboys And Indians
12. Redemption
13. Lisa, Listen To Me

Fred Lipsius

01. Blues - Part II
02. A Look To My Heart

Bobby Colomby

01. Blues - Part II
02. Takin’ It Home

David Clayton-Thomas

01. Spinning Wheel
02. Blues - Part II
03. Lucretia MacEvil
04. Lucretia’s Reprise
05. Go Down Gamblin’
06. Redemption
07. Lisa, Listen To Me
08. Yesterday’s Music
09. They
10. Hollywood
11. You’re The One
12. Nuclear Blues
13. Fantasy Stage

Dave Bargeron

01. Mama Gets High
02. Over The Hill
03. Hold On To Me
04. Are You Satisfied
05. Movement IV - Rock Reprise

Lou Marini

01. Alone
02. Song For John
03. Hip Pickles

Larry Willis

01. Inner Crisis
02. Movement I - Maglomania
03. Heavy Blue

George Wadenius

01. Save Our Ship
02. My Old Lady
03. Are You Satisfied
04. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
05. She’s Coming Home

Jerry Fisher

01. Are You Satisfied
02. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
03. She’s Coming Home

Tony Klatka

01. Look Up To The Sky
02. Thinking Of You
03. Movement III - South Mountain Shuffle

Jerry LaCroix

01. Look Up To The Sky
02. Thinking Of You
03. Are You Satisfied
04. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
05. Mean Ole World

Ron McClure

01. Movement II - Mirror Image
02. No Show

Robert Piltch

01. Fantasy Stage
02. Spanish Wine Suite: Introduction La Cantina

Bruce Cassidy

01. Agitato
02. Spanish Wine Suite: (Theme) Spanish Wine
03. Spanish Wine Suite: Latin Fire
04. Spanish Wine Suite: The Challenge
05. Spanish Wine Suite: The Duel
06. Spanish Wine Suite: Amor
07. Spanish Wine (Reprise)

Dave Piltch, Vern Dorge, Bobby Economou, Richard Martinez, Earl Seymour

01. Spanish Wine Suite: Latin Fire
02. Spanish Wine Suite: The Challenge
03. Spanish Wine Suite: The Duel
04. Spanish Wine Suite: Amor

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 06.10.17 @ 09:18am


Blood, Sweat & Tears Songs Written By The Members Of Blood, Sweat & Tears

Al Kooper

01. I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know
02. My Days Are Numbered
03. I Can’t Quit Her
04. Somethin’ Goin’ On
05. House In The Country
06. The Modern Adventures Of Plato, Diogenes And Freud
07. Refugee From Yuhupitz
08. John The Baptist (Holy John)

Steve Katz

01. Meagan’s Gypsy Eyes
02. Sometimes In Winter
03. Blues - Part II
04. The Battle
05. Lucretia’s Reprise
06. High On A Mountain
07. Valentine’s Day
08. For My Lady
09. Mama Gets High
10. “M”

Dick Halligan

01. The Battle
02. Lucretia’s Reprise
03. Symphony For The Devil
04. The Confrontation
05. The Warmup
06. The Seduction
07. The Morning After
08. The Reunion
09. Just Want To Mention (You’ve Been Alone Too Long)
10. The Owl And The Pussycat
11. Cowboys And Indians
12. Redemption
13. Lisa, Listen To Me

Fred Lipsius

01. Blues - Part II
02. A Look To My Heart
03. "M"

Bobby Colomby

01. Blues - Part II
02. Takin’ It Home
03. "M"

David Clayton-Thomas

01. Spinning Wheel
02. Blues - Part II
03. Lucretia MacEvil
04. Lucretia’s Reprise
05. Go Down Gamblin’
06. Redemption
07. Lisa, Listen To Me
08. Yesterday’s Music
09. "M"
10. They
11. Hollywood
12. You’re The One
13. Nuclear Blues
14. Fantasy Stage

Dave Bargeron

01. Mama Gets High
02. Over The Hill
03. Hold On To Me
04. Are You Satisfied
05. Movement IV - Rock Reprise

Lou Marini

01. Alone
02. Song For John
03. Hip Pickles

Larry Willis

01. Inner Crisis
02. Movement I - Maglomania
03. Heavy Blue

George Wadenius

01. Save Our Ship
02. My Old Lady
03. Are You Satisfied
04. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
05. She’s Coming Home
06. Krakbergravningen (The Crow's Funeral)

Jerry Fisher

01. Are You Satisfied
02. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
03. She’s Coming Home

Tony Klatka

01. Look Up To The Sky
02. Thinking Of You
03. Movement III - South Mountain Shuffle

Jerry LaCroix

01. Look Up To The Sky
02. Thinking Of You
03. Are You Satisfied
04. Movement IV - Rock Reprise
05. Mean Ole World

Ron McClure

01. Movement II - Mirror Image
02. No Show

Robert Piltch

01. Fantasy Stage
02. Spanish Wine Suite: Introduction La Cantina

Bruce Cassidy

01. Agitato
02. Spanish Wine Suite: (Theme) Spanish Wine
03. Spanish Wine Suite: Latin Fire
04. Spanish Wine Suite: The Challenge
05. Spanish Wine Suite: The Duel
06. Spanish Wine Suite: Amor
07. Spanish Wine (Reprise)

Dave Piltch, Vern Dorge, Bobby Economou, Richard Martinez, Earl Seymour

01. Spanish Wine Suite: Latin Fire
02. Spanish Wine Suite: The Challenge
03. Spanish Wine Suite: The Duel
04. Spanish Wine Suite: Amor

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 06.10.17 @ 12:47pm


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=os2xxK2xn_c

Steve Katz - Interview - 11/4/1984 - Rock Influence (Official)

Posted by Roy on Saturday, 06.10.17 @ 20:13pm


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